James B. Blakely1,2,3

M, #50, b. 15 June 1804, d. 19 June 1882
JAMES BLAKELY
JAMES BLAKELY
Advertisement for the Blakely Bankruptcy sale. He was a land speculator.
NOTICE OF SALE OF JAMES BLAKELY'S PROPERTY
Father*(?) Blakely b. c 1785, d. b 1830
Mother*Sarah or Alice (?) b. 1781, d. 8 Jul 1854
Relationships3rd great-grandfather of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
3rd great-grandfather of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
ReferenceA-26
Birth*15 June 1804  On 15 June 1804 Obituary gives birthdate as June 13, 1804; Family stories give Blackburn, England, but so far no definitive proof. All signs seem to point this way though as 1850 census gives his birthplace as England. Both of his obituaries state that he was born in Liverpool. since an exhaustive search was done of Lancashire with no result I (MVW) suspect Liverpool is the next place to search.

Laura Woodrough found the following record: "Sarah Blakely died age 79 August 1854." This is in the range for James mother who we are told by Walter Blakely was buried in East Liverpool in the old cemetery the Blakelys gave to the town. She was subsequently removed to the newer cemetery about 1902 as described in Walter's letter regarding the bridge company's plans.
Sebastian Wimmer's diary says James Blakely was born in Lacashire England and gives birthdate of June 15, 1804. Sebastian was James Blakely's son-in-law.4,5,3,2 
 James B. Blakely was the son of (?) Blakely and Sarah or Alice (?)
Baptism24 December 1826 He was baptized on 24 December 1826 at Roman Catholic; St. Patrick/St. Paul, Pittsburgh, PA, "Jacobus Blakely, a convert from Calvanism." 
MARRIAGE*4 November 1827 He married Susananna Smyth, daughter of John Edward Smyth and Anna Margaret Ruffner, on 4 November 1827 at Pittsburgh, PA, From SLB's "Reminiscenses" My grandfather James Blakely, married Susan Smythe. Her mother was Barbara Ruffner, whose father was Simon Ruffner. The Ruffners came to western Virginia in the 17th century from Mainz, Germany. I have hanging in my home a picture which tradition says they brought with them. It represents the sorrowful mother and is very delicately pieced together of colored paper and gold. (Note: in 1999 Laura Glass acquired this when John R. Blakely died she willed it to give it to Stephens B. Woodrough, Jr) I have heard that Simon Ruffner and his brothers, Christian and George in the year 1797, gave to Father Carroll, afterwards first Bishop in the United States, the first piece of property owned by the Church, west of the Allegheny Mountains. I have made no search for documentary evidence of this. (Note from MVW - in fact there is a huge amount of evidence for this fact.)
The Ruffner family is still numerous and prominent in West Virginia. Colonel Ernest Ruffner of the U. S. Engineers, was stationed in Cincinnati at the time of his death. His daughter. Violet, married Lewis DeBus, now dead. She lives in Cincinnati (1956). I see her occasionally and we recognize our relationship.6,2 
Death19 June 1882 He died on 19 June 1882 at St. Mary's, Elk County, PA, at age 78 This date given by Sebastian Wimmer, his son-in-law with whom James lived. Sebastian kept meticulous records encompassed in 65 annual diaries..3 
Obituary*19 June 1882 Obnituary of James B. Blakely was DEATH OF A DISTINGUISHED CATHOLIC
(From The Lake Shore Visitor – Erie Penna. 1882
Blakely—On Monday, June 19th 1882 at 11:15 A.M, at St. Mary’s Pa., James Blakely, age 78 years and four days
He whose name appears at the beginning of this notice deserves more than a mere mention. He had passed the years allotted to man by the Psalmist, and, with the exception of less than half a score, all his life had been spent in the strict and fervent observance of the true Faith. Before his 20th year the good seed had been sown in his mind, and the instrument by which the work of the Divine Husbandman was effected was by the reading of Catholic books. A native of Liverpool, England he came to Pittsburgh, PA., which city he made his home, and with whose leading interests, religious, social and political, he was for many years prominently identified. The great financial crash of 1857 stranded him, as it did thousands of others, and with his family he moved to St. Mary’s Elk county, Pa., where he resided until his death which was hastened by a fall received on the 11th of May. In St. Marys he filled various positions of trust, being Burgess, Postmaster, and county Superintendent of public Schools. The first and last offices he filled several terms. He leaves an aged widow and several children. His eldest son, Dr. James Blakely, who died some years ago, was well known in Erie, and two others entered the service of religion, Mother Beatrice, O.S.B, who died last March, and Father Aloysius, C.S.P., Vice-Rector of the Passionist Retreat, Hoboken, N.J.
To the last moments Mr. Blakely was attended with zealous and untiring care by Rev. Father Celestine, O.S.B, Prior at St. Mary’s, and surrounded by his devoted wife and children, he peacefully passed away. His funeral took place on Thursday from St. Mary’s Church. Solemn Requiem Mass was chanted by his son, Rev. Father Aloysius assisted by Rev. Father Selection, Prior, as Deacon, and Rev. Father Edmund as Subdeacon.
His sufferings during his last illness were so intense, and his resignation to the Divine will so perfect, that it may be hoped he thus satisfied for any transgressions of his past life, yet let not his friends forget that the infinite justice of God can not bear the slightest stain, therefore let them, and let all who read this tribute, pray for the repose of his soul, that his time of probation may be shortened, and that “Eternal Rest” may soon be his portion in the realms of ‘Perpetual Light”

OBITUARY
Elk Co. Gazette 6-22-1882
Mr. James Blakely
On Monday June 19th 1882 at 11 o’clock A.M. at his residence in St. Mary’s, Pa, Mr. James Blakely.
Mr. Blakely was born in Liverpool, England June 13th, 1804, consequently was four days over the age of 78 years when he died. He emigrated to this country with his parents in 1817. Landing in Baltimore, his father moved to Pittsburgh with his family. Deceased lived in Pittsburgh over forty years and during that time was prominently identified with the leading interests of that city both religious and political, having filled an unusually large number of offices in that time. He was originally a member of the Episcopalian denominations, but embraced the Catholic faith about the 24th year of his age, of which he has since been a zealous and consistent member. He married Miss Susan Smyth, a member of one of the oldest Catholic families in this country about the year 1828. His wife is an American lady, there being eight generations of her family lying in American ground before her. Mr. Blakely moved to St. Mary’s in 1862, he coming here some months before his family joined him. In St. Mary’s he was twice elected chief burgess, and served two terms as County Superintendent, and was for several years Postmaster of this borough. He was an active business man, his store for years being the headquarters for books, stationery and religious articles. He enjoyed excellent health until about three years ago, since when he had been gradually failing. He had the misfortune to fall and fracture the thigh bone of his right leg several weeks ago, which served to hasten his death. Mr. Blakely was a remarkable man, and is the father of a remarkable family, Probably the most noted for refinement and intelligence of any in this section of the country.
He was a man of excellent social qualities, and had hosts of friends who will read this notice of his death with sorrow. The funeral will take place from the St. Mary’s Catholic church this Thursday morning at 9 o’clock. Deceased leaves an aged widow and several sons and daughters, with a large number of grandchildren to mourn for him. Peace to his soul. MVW note - I suspect this was written by Sebastian Wimmer his son in law. on 19 June 1882 at St. Mary's, PA.5 
Burial*22 June 1882 He was buried on 22 June 1882 at St. Mary's; Wimmer Plot, St. Mary's, Elk County, PA, Wimmer Lot has three names, but the space between Susan X. Blakely and Lavinia and Earnest Wimmer is presumed to be Sebastian Wimmer grave.
James and Susanna Blakely were buried in the Blakely lot along with Josephine Luhr.
Here is Laura Steneck's guess on the history of the cemetery lot.
The lot was sold to Luhr Family. James, Susan and Josephine are lost to the ages.
And since I have nothing better to do today...at least for the moment....
I have solved PART of the mystery of who's buried on the "Blakely" plot.....
The Joseph listed on the 1998 letter was Joseph J. Luhr, SON OF CHARLES & ELIZABETH LUHR......
The Frank listed is really FRANCES LUHR, wife of Joseph J. Probably called Frank during her lifetime...as was Frances Mary Blakely...called Aunt Frank.
The Augustine listed is the son of Joseph J. & Frances Luhr
The Jorden and Pierre listed are children of Augustine and Frances.
There are just 9 graves on the Blakely plot, as it was acknowledged IN 1938 that "his aunt, Josephine Luhr, was buried on the lot" when the deed "was given to Joseph Luhr on May 11th".....Now.....given by whom????
Still haven't identified Edmund, Aurelia and Donald Luhr.....


Here is Laura's description of where the lots are located:
The Wimmer plot was exactly where Mary Miller said it was and was the first plot we found. There is a obolisk on the plot, so wasn't hard to find. The problem was finding the LUHR lot that contained the remains of our Blakely ancestors, James & Susanna. I found 1 plot, situated near a large oak tree and Ron found a plot situated at the top of the hill near the fence line both with Luhr graves. So which one was the Blakely plot originally? The one at the top of the hill!!! I determined this by the dates of the LUHR burials - as they had to be after 1925 when the plot was sold to the Luhrs.
WIMMER PLOT
Blakely Luhr Lot. This is the lot where Susan and James Blakely were buried, but there are no markers.
Biography  The land struggle
James B. and Susanna [Smyth] Blakely were a remarkable couple with an equally remarkable family of eight accomplished children. But the story of James and his family would not be complete if we did not touch on what is called the "land struggle," that persisted for three generations!

James Blakely filed bankruptcy in 1857, a result of the great panic of that year. He voluntarily assigned all of his holdings to John J. Mitchell (eldest son of his brother in law), who acted as trustee. But, for some unknown reason J. J. Mitchell resigned and the District Court appointed William Campbell to take over as trustee, and therein-lay part of the problem. James was a resident of Pittsburgh at the time and the papers of assignment were filed in the court there, but most of his lands and city lots were in several different states and territories; therein lays the rest of the problem!

The land dispute seems to have begun in 1885, three years after James Blakely died and 28 years after his bankruptcy, when Mr. William Stahl purchased 160 acres of land in Minnesota that had belonged originally to James Blakely, sold in 1861 by William Campbell, trustee, to a man named William Badger who held the land until his death in the late 1880's when it was sold to William G. Stahl. While Stahl's attorney was examining the title, he questioned the validity of Campbell's appointment by the court, therefore filed a suit against the original trustee, J. J. Mitchell, and all of the Blakely heirs, seeking to get a "quiet title" to the property. It's likely he wanted a quitclaim deed from the Blakelys in order to perfect the chain of ownership. Essentially, the suit questioned the jurisdiction of Pennsylvania courts over lands in other states.

The case went to trial and ended with a verdict in favor of the plaintiff, Stahl, but the Blakely defendants appealed for a new trial. At the second trial, the Blakely defendants won. The family had visions of recovering some of the large tracts of land their father had once owned, now worth considerably more than when it was sold to pay his creditors years before. Laurie Blakely, son of James and a practicing attorney at the time, traveled to Minnesota and located all of the property. In a summary letter to the other family members he announced that they would recover "millions"! Stahl, in the meantime, appealed the decision to the Supreme Court of Minnesota where, in 1889, Stahl was again victorious. So the vision of millions evaporated into thin air and the story ended? No.

In January 1894, five years after the Stahl decision by the Supreme Court of Minnesota, the Blakely heirs, with Lavinia [Blakely] Wimmer as their "leader" (likely because her son was the District Attorney), again tried their hand at recovering some compensation for the valuable lands given up by their father, James Blakely. This time the Blakely heirs hired an attorney in East Liverpool, Ohio, and had him send notices to every individual owning city lots and lands once owned by James Blakely, questioning the validity of Campbell's (the second trustee) appointment. The lots in question covered a large area of the business center, and the inference of a lawsuit so long after the fact caused quite a stir in the town of East Liverpool. Huge articles appeared on the front pages of their local newspapers and the town talked of nothing else for several months. Finally, towards the fall of that year, 1894, this, too, came to an end - NOT favorable to the Blakely heirs. Sebastian Wimmer sent a copy of a letter received by his son Ernest, attorney at law, to his sister-in-law, Mary Louise Ryan. The letter was from the attorney they had hired in East Liverpool and it said in part - "the case is at an end."

And, so ends another vision of recovering millions. Well, if not millions, at least a nice piece of change! End of story? Well......... no, not quite.

The Blakely heirs give up on the vast lands and city lots once owned by James, but in 1902 or so, a bridge company came to East Liverpool and wanted to construct another bridge across the Ohio river between East Liverpool and Newall, West Virginia. In order to do this, it would be necessary to use part of the old town cemetery and some graves would have to be moved. Wait a minute! The cemetery land was given by the Blakelys to the town of East Liverpool and was to be a cemetery forever. The bridge company wished to pay the Blakely heirs a small amount for the land they needed; (the cemetery was no longer accepting new burials). Once again the Blakely heirs saw an opportunity for compensation for their father’s loss. They noted that when the land was given it had a stipulation (no documentation of this has been found) that it would revert to the heirs if "ever used for anything other than a cemetery." The cemetery was already closed and most of the graves moved, but only when the bridge company became interested did the Blakely heirs see their chance. They decided that the town would have to return this valuable tract to the Blakely heirs. (In fact the land was on the outskirts of town, was a steep and eroding hill with little value to anyone except the bridge company that needed a place to anchor.) The Blakelys refused the offer from the bridge company, which eventually negotiated with the town for the parcel they wanted and once again the Blakely heirs were disappointed. The bridge was constructed, and now even a highway has eaten away most of the two acres of ground that once held the mortal remains of the long-dead ancestors of many. What little is left today is not much more than a green area, which the locals call Skeleton Park, because of the few graves still there. The Blakely heirs never received a dime.

Out of curiosity, Stephens Blakely Woodrough, a fourth generation Blakely heir, and his wife, Margot, traveled to East Liverpool, Ohio in 1998. Together with their daughter Page and son-in-law Mark McDermott, they walked the bridge and visited Skeleton Park, the cemetery land donated so long ago to the early town of East Liverpool. They walked around downtown, taking pictures and asking questions. Perhaps it was best that the activities of the prior generations of Blakely heirs were forgotten. Otherwise, it is questionable if this generation of Blakelys would have been so graciously received when they breezed into town that cool, fall day.

Yes, they lost everything in the crash of 1857, as did many people. And yes, the Blakely heirs did stir things up a bit forty years later. But for all the good that was done by James and John Simpson Blakely they should always be remembered. Moreover, the bankruptcy and all the attempts at land reclamation attempted over the years produced records that caused the life of James and Susan Blakely to become accessible to the present family. Recently, their bankruptcy papers along with a full inventory of their immense land holdings; home and office were found stashed in the attic at Beechwood. The family papers and memorabilia now rest in quiet peace in the Ohio Historical Association in Columbus, Ohio. The curator, Bill Gates, was absolutely thrilled to receive this tiny fragment of early history. As family, we are delighted that more than a hundred years later this Blakely family is finding a proper place in the early fabric of East Liverpool, Ohio as well as Pittsburgh and St. Marys, Pennsylvania.







This picture was taken in 1998. The Blakely land is on a bluff overlooking the Ohio River. The Newall Bridge connects Ohio and West Virginia. The construction of the bridge in the early 20th century raised the Blakely family hopes of recovering either money or property.

     
 
Note1800  In 1800 BLACKBURN, (N. lat. 53º.43" W. lon. 2º.24".) a flourishing market town and extensive parish, (one of the two which comprize nearly the whole hundred) in the deanry of Blackburn. It is situated 8 miles N.W. of Haslingden, 11 miles E. of Preston, 25 miles N.N.W. of Manchester, and 210 miles from London. The living is a Vicarage; Patron the Archbishop of Canterbury. Beside the old, or parish church, the town contains two others, viz. St. Paul's, and St. John's, as well as Chapels belonging to Dissenters of various denominations. Amongst the charitable institutions is a Free-school, founded by Queen Elizabeth. The Leeds and Liverpool Canal passes near the town. Blackburn has been long famous for its Cotton goods, formerly known by the name of Blackburn Greys, which have been superceded by Calicoes, of which a great number of pieces are annually manufactured here. In the southern parts of the parish, coal is got in abundance; and in one of the hills, is also a mine of allum, which has not been worked for some time, on account of the expence of removing the superincumbent strata. Market day, Wednesday. Fairs, Easter Monday - and May 11, for cattle, horses, toys, &c. September 29 for toys and smallwares. In 1801, Blackburn contained 2352 houses, and 11,980 inhabitants.

A book found at the LDS library, "Bits of Old Blackburn" gives the following information about the name of Blakely: "Blakey Moor is the modern name of a plot of land in the Centre of Blackburn. The old and correct name was "Blakeley Moor," the proper derivation of which is probably "Blake" and "ley" with "ley" meaning a pasture land for cattle, and "Blake" (as in the name Blakewater and Blackburn), meaning yellow - the yellow lea, or Blakeley. Moor is a common term for waste land. The property in Barton Street, Bond Street and part of Nab lane is built upon what was Blakey Moor. Fish Lane (now Cardwell Place) at one time led directly onto the Moor. As the old historic fair ground of Blackburn, and as the cattle market for 55 years, the Moor has a history of great interest to the people of the town. The moor is mentioned in a royal decree dated the 11th of July, 1618, and made by King James I on the petition of the property owners of Blackburn. (for full text see MVW file). 
Emigration*September 1819 He emigrated in September 1819 from Liverpool, England, Baltimore, MD.7 
Immigration*September 1819  In September 1819 at Baltimore, MD, Entry states that on May 8, 1829 James Blakely who had lived in or near Pittsburgh since 1819 filed intention of naturalization. Record states that he arrived in U.S Sept 1819 at Baltimore having emmigrated from Liverpool. His age in 1829 was given as 24. His sponsor was Copernicus Walters of Pittsburgh. ( Copernicus married 1818 on July 14th — Copernicus Walters to Miss Margaretta McRoberts. Perhaps there is a clue here.) The same record shows William Blakely and states that James Blakely of Pittsburgh was sponsor in 1830.

(Family stories give original place of Immigration as Washington Co., PA. Need to research this more.)
Note that another source (his son-in-law Sebastian Wimmer in his diary) says he came in 1817.

Blackburn England is an ancient place. Its name derives from the stream known as "Blakewater" Its old main road from south to north was the Roman road that linked Manchester with Ribchester. Its position on this road in Saxon and Viking times made it the chief town of North East Lancashire, which was known then as the Blackburn Hundred. The town saw momentous changes as a result of the Industrial Revolution.

The 1826 Pittsburgh City Directory lists Copernicus Walters as being a sadler and living on the east side of Wood Street between 4th and Diamond. No Blakely is listed in this directory.4,7,8,3 
Biography*1821  A Pittsburg history states: "James Blakely came from England in 1821, settling near Pittsburgh. He came from Anglo-Danish stock. They were land owners in Lancashire, and while not Catholics, were still loyal to the Stuarts; they lost much property and life in the wars of those times. James became a Catholic through much reading and conviction at the age of seventeen years, and brought his children up in that faith and to be loyal to their own country. He was a devoted friend of Bishop O'Connor, of sainted memory. Together they started the "Brotherhood of St. Joseph," of which Mr. Blakely was the first president and continued until his removal to St. Mary's, where he died."

Stories of the family (as well as newly acquired documents - 1998) say that he was bankrupted by the panic of 1857 and left Pittsburgh for St. Mary's, Pa. in Benzinger Township of Elk Co. The census records for 1860 and 1870 support this story.

In 1931 his grandson, Paul Lendrum Blakely wrote the following:
"He settled in Pittsburgh in the later thirties or early forties. He engaged in real estate and private banking, and soon acquired what for those days was a large fortune. It is interesting to know that although "a typical Englishman" he differed from the class in one important particular -- that was his devotion to England all but turned to hatred as often as he thought of the wrongs of Ireland! And it is consoling, for his grandhildren he was noted for, his interest in every phase of Catholic activity in the then little town of Pittsburgh."

His grandaughter, Susan H. Blakely, commented in 1978 that she recalled seeing newspaper headlines saying, "Blakely Loses Millions". This headline must have been in a family album as it would have happened at least thirty years before Susan was born. She also told stories of land that was given for a park that would revert to the family if it was not used for such. She said that her father, Laurie Blakely, was absent from home a great deal of time trying to reclaim the property. It is likely that there is truth to this story as there is a deed in East Liverpool from James and wife Susannah of Pittsburgh giving land for a cemetery in 1850. The deed is recorded in Columbiana Co., Ohio Deed Book #45 on P.97. It states that James and wife Susannah of City of Pittsburgh gave land to the town of Liverpool providing that proceeds of all lots sold to be expended on management and improving same and that the land was to be used as a cemetery for all religious beliefs and that the poor should be buried free. Possibly this is the land that was not used as it should have been, became valuable and is the source of the story.

In 1998 SBW, MVW and Page and Mark Mc Dermott visited East Liverpool. The old cemetery (now known as "Skeleton Park" is there as is the bridge that caused all the uproar from the descendants. Sifting through the myth and family tales it appears that the headline "Blakely Loses Millions" was associated with the bankruptcy James Blakely faced in the financial panic of the late 1850's. No doubt his child Laurie Blakely grew up hearing this story and when he was older went back to East Liverpool when the bridge was being built to see what money could be recovered. Laurie's son, Stephens L. Blakely, was a new attorney at the time and together father and son tried to get payment for the taking of the cemetary land. Nothing came of it. Essentially two family stories merged into one. in 1821 at Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA.
Religioncirca 1830 He was He was said to have been a member of the Oxford or Tractarian Movement. Here is a description:
The Oxford Movement may be looked upon in two distinct lights. "The conception which lay at its base," according to the Royal Commission on Ecclesiastical Discipline, 1906, "was that of the Holy Catholic Church as a visible body upon earth, bound together by a spiritual but absolute unity,though divided into national and other sections. This conception drew with it the sense of ecclesiastical continuity, of the intimate and unbroken connection between the primitive Church and the Church of England, and of the importance of the Fathers as guides and teachers. It also tended to emphasize points of communion between those different branches of the Church, which recognize the doctrine or fact of Apostolic Succession"
(Report, p. 54). That is the point of view maintained in the "Tracts for the Times" from 1833 to 1841, which gave its familiar name to the
"Tractarian" Movement. They originated and ended with John Henry Newman. 
Residence1837 He lived in 1837 at Pittsburgh, PA; In 1837 James Blakely is living in the "Northern Liberties" section......according to the Harris Business Directory.(now the 5th Ward the directory goes on....) 
Anecdote1837  In 1837 at Description of East Liverpool The town where James and John Blakely set up their pottery business,East Liverpool Ohio, is a flourishing town exactly half way between Pittsburg and Wheeling. In 1837 it has a steamboat yard, steam grist and saw mill and several other works either in building or contemplation. Merchants, manufacturers, and mechanics, have now, and always will meet with, liberal encouragement. The situation is remarkably healthy, always having the advantages of pure air and good water. It is the terminating point of the Ashtabula, Warren and Liverpool Rail Road, part of which is under contract, and the work progressing. From present appearances, this place bids fair to become one of the principal ports on the Ohio River. 
LANDCONTRA1838 He purchased land in 1838 Volumn 26 page 439 is the deed from James Blakely to the Catholic Congregation of East Liverpool. This is the land in the "land struggle". 
Employment*1838  In 1838 at Realtor/Banker/Pottery Broker; Woodward, Blakely & Co., Pittsburgh, PA, Woodward and Blakely pottery started in late 1840's and lasted until failure in 1857.
"Pittsburg as it Was" by George Thurston 1857 states: There are in the city three firms who transact a real estate business. Among them are Blakely and Richey at the corner of Smithfield and 7th streets.
Another source gives Blakely office as being on Pennsylvania between Walnut and Factory.

http://digital.library.pitt.edu/cache//3/1/7/31735038289074/0134.jp2.s.jpg.7
JAMES BLAKELY ADVERTISEMENT
JAMES BLAKELY ADVERTISEMENT
BLAKELY POTTERY
CENSUS1840*1840 He appeared on the census in 1840 at Pittsburgh, PA; James Blakely, living in 5th Ward, Allegheny Co., Pa. has 1 female, age given as 70-80! Actually, mama was ONLY 61 - but maybe they thought she was a bit older.....OR could be a scribbinger error and they put the one in the wrong column......either way.....THAT'S OUR SARAH!!!!!9 
LANDCONTRA*1841  In 1841 at Section 24 of E. Liverpool, East Liverpool, Columbiana County, OH, In spite of the fact that James and Susan owned and transferred a great deal of land, I do not believe they lived in East Liverpool. I think rather that James was an agent for his brother operating from Pittsburg.
A number of land transactions involved the following people in addition to Susannah and James Blakely: Laurence and Mary Mitchell (Susannah's sister) William G and Susan Smith (possibley Susannah's brother) and Rick and Mary Ann Marsley. 
DEED*1850  In 1850 at Conveyance, East Liverpool, Columbiana County, OH, Deed Book 45 p. 97 describes the gift of land for $2.00 from James and wife Susannah of Pittsburg to the town. It is two acres near the intersection of the east side of West St. and the north side of 4th street. The land is conveyed "provided that the proceeds of all lots sold to be expended in management and improving same as the said council and their successors may deem to be the most expedient and the said lot shall only to be used as a cemetery and to be kept sacred for that purpose forever and provided that no corpse shall be refused interrment on account of their religious belief and the poor shall be interred free." (Note that the deed gives a full meets and bounds description of the land.)
Witnesses for the conveyance were two daughters - Mary Louisa and Susanna M. Blakely.
NEWALL BRIDGE
EAST LIVERPOOL OHIO
Anecdote*29 February 1852  On 29 February 1852 at President of St. Vincent DePaul, Pittsburgh, PA, The History of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul in the Diocese of Pittsburg began with the first regular meeting, held Feb. 29, 1852, in the Literary Hall, old St. Paul's Cathedral, then located at Fifth Ave. and Grant St. in Pittsburg. This was seven years after the Society began in the United States at St. Louis, MO in 1845; or nearly nineteen years following its original formation in Paris, France in 1833. James Blakely was the first president of the society. Vice president was Dr. W. Draine and Jacob Porter, Secretary was John Mitchell (James Blakely's nephew and also trustee in Bankruptcy) and Treasurer was F. A. Frethy.

The following are the minutes of the first meeting:
"The Society of St. Vincent De Paul"
An adjourned meeting of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul was held in the Hall of the "Catholic Literary and Defense Association" on Sunday, February 29 1852 at 2 PM James Blakely, Esq in the chair and John J. Mitchel, Secretary. The Right Rev. Bishop Michael O'Connor was present and delivered a brief, but forcible (sic) address in which he clearly explained and approved of the objects of the Society. Rules and Regulations were adopted and officers elected. 
Residence*1853 He lived in 1853 at Lawrenceville, Pittsburgh, PA; 1860 census says he lived in 6th ward. Lawrenceville's boundaries given as from "forks of the road to Pennsylvania Ave and from the Allegheny to 50th St.10 
Note*1857 He James and wife Susanna owned and sold much land in Columbiana Co, East Liverpool. The level of activity supports what might be expected of a real estate investor.
They were bankrupted in the late 1850's from a financial panic and speculation. Their bankruptcy papers give a detailed account of their holdings both personal and business. in 1857 at Pittsburgh, PA
Residence1857 He lived in 1857 at Pittsburgh, PA; The Blakelys lived at a place called "Hillside House." Sebastian Wimmer mentions going there many times in his 1857 diary. Evidently it was in the location of Lawrenceville which is a suburb of Pittsburgh. The home must have been within walking distance of the train station as that is how he commuted from downtown almost daily.

In January 2000 MVW wrote to the Lawrenceville Historical Society in an effort to pinpoint the location. They said that the location that comes closest to the former intersection of Mulberry and O'Hara Street and that O'Hara is now known as 12th Street. Houses with even numbered addresses were likely on the left side of the street as you face the Allegheny. The librarian suspects that the area might be known as "The Strip" district. An entry for 1856 says home was on the Collins Turnpike, but this was likely a second home.
BANKRUPTCY*1857 He declared bankruptcy in 1857 at Pittsburgh, PA, In 1998 the Bankruptcy papers including an extensive inventory were found in the attic of Beechwood. Apparently Laurie J. Blakely ordered copies after his father's death in connection with an attempt to collect money for land given to Town of East Liverpool for use as a Cemetery which was subsequently used for bridge right of way and a hospital parking lot. In 1998 Margot and Steve Woodrough visited East Liverpool, located the land and determined that the whole project to recapture some of the family fortune had been an exercise in futility from the start but the whole process resulted in the preservation of very interesting records.2,4 
Residence1859 He lived in 1859 at 103 Elm, Pittsburgh, PA; This information according to the Pittsburgh City Directory.

http://www2.county.allegheny.pa.us/RealEstate/Search_Results.asp?CheckDa
ta=true.
This is a generic view of "Hillside Home". I suspect this is what the Blakely place resembled.
CENSUS1860*1 June 1860 He appeared on the census on 1 June 1860 at Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA; James is shown with personal property of $600. His daughter Susanna listed as a music teacher and his son Laurie as a clerk at age 17. The city directory gives the street address of 103 Elm. Elm Street is called Edmond in 2003. Evidently the family moved shortly after the census as a book about early St. Marys says that she moved there in 1860.11 
ELECTION*1862 He was elected in 1862 at Burgess; St. Marys, St. Mary's, Elk County, PA
CENSUS1870*1 June 1870 He appeared on the census on 1 June 1870 at St. Mary's, Elk County, PA; There are two grown children i.e. Laurie listed as a lawyer with personal property of $400. and Susana with personal property of $4,000 living at home. They are probably there to look after aging parents.12 
Residence1880 He lived in 1880 at St. Mary's, PA; I found James living next door to Dr. Eban J. Russ at #5 Center St. in 1880 census! Must be close to where the Towne House Inn stands today! The Luhr family lived two doors away.13 
CENSUS1880*1 June 1880 He appeared on the Census on 1 June 1880 at St. Mary's, Elk County, PA; Occupation shown as merchant.14 
Name Variation1885  Found this initial in Wimmer Diary dated September 15, 1885.3 
NEWSPAPER*9 January 1897 He was mentioned in a newspaper (Newspaper Article from The East Liverpool Tribune, January 9, 1897)
     The Blakely Suit--A great many persons owning property between Fourth street and Starkey's Lane were startled to receive the following notice through the mail the fore part of this week:
     Dear Sir:--We have been instructed by the heirs of James Blakely, deceased, to notify you that said heirs claim the title of your property to be in them, that is that portion in Blakely's additon to this city.
     The history of the same is entirely too long to give in the notification, but in brief, owing to the assignee's illegal acts, by virtue of whose deed you claim title, you have never been the legal possessor of the same.
     I want to give you ample time to have your attorney look into this matter befoe taking further steps to litigate the same.
     A great part of this section of East Liverpool was sold by the assignee of James Blakely, who became financially involved during the great panic of 1857.
     This is part of the estate of Claiborne Simms, who in 1824 bought the farm of Fawcett and Pemberton, and all the unsold lots of their additon to East Liverpool. The terriroty bought by Claiborne Simms extended from West Side Market street to Jethro, North to the Croft farm, and the south line of the Geddes farm, reaching east to a line parallel with the east side of Lincoln avenue and back to west side of Market street. When Claiborne Simms died, about 1833, the late Alex. Young was appointed administrator of his estate, and he sold all the potion north of Fourth street to James Blakely. Previous, and during his lifetime, Claiborne Simms made an addition to "Liverpool," commencing at the alley west of Jackson, and extending west to Mill street, and north to west side of Fourth street. James Blakely laid out an addition from the north side of Fourth street to Sixth street, and Seventh street. Some of the lots in his first addition he sold, and to all such lots there is no dispute as to title.
     When Blakely became financially embarrassed he made an assignment of all these lots to one Mitchell. Later a second assignee was appointed, who was James Campbell. Now comes the heirs of James Blakely, over forty years after, and claim fraud and irregularities on the part of one or both of these assignees, and seek to wrest from innocent persons property they have bought and paid for, and built homes thereon, which in many instances have been liebel without dispute for nearly half a century. A great sensation was the result of this threatened suit, but no person need feel alarmed. Of course they may have to spend a few dollars to defend the title to their home; but if there was fraud, the assignees and their bondsmen can and should be held accountable. The whole thing has a suspicious aspect of attempted "hold-up," or wild west robbery methods. We are told that "compromise" has already been made on similar suits over western lands. We are told this is not a game of "bluff," and on the same day notices are mailed to persons, who are politely invited to come to the Blakely attorneys and talk compromise. If the assigness of James Blakely defrauded his heirs, why are they so many years finding it out? Why did not James Blakely himslef know something about the fraud? He died satisfied, so far as any one knows, that his assignees were faithful and true to the interests of his creditors and himself as well. If not, why did not the creditors, who were as much interested as Mr. Blakely, at once pursue and arrest these "bad assignees," who were guilty of such gross fraud and irregularities as are charged? Our advice to the people whose property is affected, is to entertain no offers of compromise. Pay nothing until you have to. Combine together and makea test case and fight for your rights as property owners who have paid for your homes and defrauded no one. The courts ought to and will protect you.

Newspaper article from the Daily Times) AFTER OHIO PROPERTY     A Pittsburg Woman Claims Fraud in Distributing Valuable Property.
     Pittsburg, January 7 - Through the alleged dishonesty of the assignee of James Blakely, in Pittsburg, in 1857, the title of property in East Liverpool, valued at several million dollars, is questioned. The heirs have put their claims in the hands of attorneys, and notices have been served on the owners of over 150 lots in the business center of that city that their titles will be questioned in court.
     Blakely was a wealthy Pittsburger, and owned extensive property interest in East Liverpool. He assigned, and it is now alleged that the title of the property was never transferred, and that the disposition of the property was a direct steal. The property in dispute includes some of the largest business properties in East Liverpool, including five churches.
     There are six direct heirs of James Blakely living. They are Laura J. Blakely, Mary L. Ryan, Susan X Blakely, Rev Aloysius Blakely, the widow of Dr. James Blakely, and her four children, and Lavina Harvey Wimmer. The one who is pushing the present case is Mrs. Wimmer, who lives near Pittsburg. She has employed counsel, and started an investigation. East Liverpool is all excited over the matter.
     (Mr. James A. Blakely, of this city, is one of the heirs directly interested in the case - Ed. Times)


(Newspaper article)          PROPERTY WORTH MILLIONS.
Heirs File Claims for 150 Lots in the Business Center of East Liverpool.
     EAST LIVERPOOL, Ohio January 4 - Through the alleged dishonesty of the assignee of James Blakely, in Pittsburg, in 1857, the title of property in East Liverpool, valued at several millions, is questioned. The heirs have put their claims in the hands of attorneys, and notices have been served on the owners of over 150 lots in the business center of the city that their titles will be questioned in court. Blakely was a wealthy Pittsburger, and owned extensive property interests here. He assigned, and it is now alleged that the title of the property was never transferred.
MVW note: Laurie and I examined all of the correspondence associated with this case and decided that Laurie Blakely and Effie Ryan were the original people interested in recovering some of James' lost fortune. They didn't succeed, but when Stephens L. Blakely , as a young lawyer, was looking for a case he reopened the issue. Nothing came of it. All of the paperwork associated with the case was found in Beechwood's attic about 1999. Many of the papers were deposited with the Ohio Historical association. Other personal papers remain in MVW file. The Laura J. Blakely mentioned above is Laurie James Blakely, son of James Blakely. on 9 January 1897. 
RECORDS*2003  In 2003 at Columbus, Ohio, All original records from James Blakely and John Simpson Blakely including pictures were donated to the Ohio Hisotrical Society where they will be preserved. Copies of most papers are still in MVW file.

Blakely Family Collection, MSS
1345 AV and The Ohio Historical Society


James Blakely GOODS CLAIMED UNDER $300.00 Ex law     
AMOUNT     ITEM     VALUE
1     Book case and Secretary     15
1     Pair Card tables     5
1     Arm Chair on Castors     15
6     Parlor Cushion Chairs     12
2     Pictures offering Frankencense & Descent from the Cross     6
1     Oil Lamp     2
1     Mirror     10
20     Yards carpet small parlor     6
1     Hearth rug on same     2.5
1     Fender Spittoon Spit box poker & tongs     4
1     Hall painting Father McQuire     10
1     Carpet large front parlor     22
1     Bed and bedding and bedstead (spare room)     35
1     Bedstead and bedding (boys room)     18
1     Bedstead N.E. corner     15
1     Poplar Wardrobe     6
1     Bureau     5
1     Carpet on same room     4
1     Bed and Bedding S.E. room 2nd story     18
1     Old sofa     12
1     Extension table in dining room     7
12     Common Chairs     3
1     Lot of Queensware including all articles in diring room cupboard     10
All the tinware and Kitchen furniture     5
1     Milking Cow     30
1     Lot of potatoes in the ground     2.5
1     Lot of Cabbage and other vegitables (sic)     2
1     Dog lot of rye and chickins (sic) and hay     18
TOTAL     300


AMOUNT
ITEM
VALUE

1
Iron Safe
75

1
Walnut Office desk
6

1
Office table
1

1
Paper cupboard
2

1
Settee
1.5

5
Arm chairs
4

1
Wash Stand basin
1

1
Lounger ?
3

2
Pitchers
0.25

2
Counters
10

1
Cherry desk (front)
3

1
Common desk
1

2
Water Urns
1

1
Stove and pipe
5

1
County map
2

1
Frame and picture (Levenworth)
0.5

1
brush broom and looking glass
0.5

1
Map of City of Pittsburgh
2

2
Spittons
0.2

lot of pocket maps
0.5

lot of wood and fuel at House in Collins Township
1

TOTAL
120.45.
 
Note10 June 2008 He In a determined effort to find James' family in England I hired a researcher. A rather diligent seearch turned up nothing. The Blakelys had a oral tradition of having come from Blackburn Lancashire England. Apparently this was a myth. See below.
Hello Margaret
I am pleased to inform you that I have received the following report from ourLancashire researcher.
Research request:
To establish the names of John Blakely’s parents.

Lancashire Record Office-15th May 2008

I began the search for John Simpson Blakely’s baptism in the Non-Conformist registers of Blackburn and Darwen. The following N/C registers were searched:
Blackburn Islington Particular Baptists (Ref:Mf1/65 RG4/1200) 1800-1819
Darwen New Dissenters (Ref: Mf1/65 RG4/1017) 1805-1819
Old House Chapel, Darwen (Ref: Mf1/65 RG4/1201) 1795-1820
Blackburn Chapel St. Independent (Ref: Mf1/66 RG4/1018) 1809-1821
Over Darwen, Lower Chapel Congregationalists (Ref: Mf1/66 Rg4/882) 1800-1815
Blackburn Clayton St. Wesleyan (Ref: Mf1/66 RG4/2002)
Over Darwen Wesleyan Methodists (Ref:Mf1/82 Rg4/1057)
Methodist Register Book for Over Darwen 1802-1820
Over Darwen New Dissenters (Ref: RG4/107)1800-1820

There were no Blakely entries in any of the above registers.

The following RC registers were searched:
St. Alban’s, Blackburn (Ref: Mf1/66a) 1806-1815

This register listed several Ashton and Simpson entries and several children of Michael and Margaret Houghton, but there were no Blakely entries.

I also searched the RC registers of Samlesbury (CRS 23) and Fernyhalgh (CRS 130). Again, no Blakely entries.

The following Blackburn C of E registers were searched:
St. Paul’s (Ref: PR3340) 1806-1815
This register contained entries relating to Joseph and Catherine Blakey and Richard and Jane Houghton, but no John or James Blakely.

St. John the Evangelist (Ref: PR 3001/1/4) 1808-1817
St. James’, Darwen 1810-1815 (Ref: PR 2878/1/1-6)
No relevant entries.

St. Mary the Virgin, Blackburn (Ref:DRB2/9)
The original register for St. Mary’s is extremely difficult to read, with minute writing and soiled pages, so I abandoned this and had a look at the BTs , which were much more legible.

There were one or two entries which I thought worth noting, but they weren’t a direct match. It’s possible the surname spelling may have been miss-transcribed.

Pge 26 No2
John Brakely son of Henry and Mary Brakely of Rishton,Blackburn born 30th May 1793 bapt. 28th May 1793
Pge 138 No 27
Mary Ann Blakely dau. of Henry and Mary Blakely of Rishton bapt. 17th Aug 1800
James son of Henry and Alice Brakely of Blackburn bapt. 6th Sept. 1812
Mary dau. of Henry and Alice Brakely? of Blackburn Weaver Bapt. 24th April 1814

I searched the marriage register of St. Mary’s for a marriage of Henry Blakely/Brakely and Mary or Alice but it was not listed.

The Baptism register for St. Peter’s Chapel Salesbury and Tockholes Chapel were also searched for the year 1812, but there were no Blakely entries.

I searched the Boyd’s Marriage Index of Lancashire for any marriage involving the names Blakely/Haughton between 1790-1813. There were no matches.

It would appear from the parish registers that Blakely was not a common name in the Blackburn area. There was quite a concentration of Blakely names in Liverpool, Manchester and Bolton in the early 1800s. It was disappointing not to find anything helpful, but all the available Blackburn and Darwen registers were searched in the required time.

This was the message researcher sent to me:
I have attached report and invoice for Job NO WW690. This was disappointing. Is client definite that John Blakely was born in Blackburn? Do they have any immigration or naturalisation documents, which should state their place of birth? I thought it surprising that out of the 17 Blackburn and Darwen registers searched, there was only one actual Blakely entry.
An e-mail invoice will be issued to you by our accounts department.
Regards,
Wendy on 10 June 2008. 
Note2011 He East Liverpool Historical Society
Irishtown
Sources for this article are Tim Brookes, Joan Witt, Frank Dawson and Frank's newest book Picking Elderberries A Small Town Story. Many thanks to all three.

This began as a result of a email sent to the East Liverpool Historical Society on December 28, 2010.

Request Information

The newspaper today had Joe McNicol's Obituary. In his obituary he was born February 17, 1934 in East Liverpool. It stated that he livid in the "Irishtown" area of East Liverpool.

I am not aware of the area in East Liverpool was wondering if in your records you knew of this area.

Thank You for your consideration in this matter.

William Cunningham

The email was forwarded to East Liverpool Historical Society President Tim Brookes and Vice President Joan Witt.

Tim Brookes and Joan Witt replied back to us that Irishtown was the area around City Hospital and probably extended eastward to Jackson Street. Joan suggested we ask Frank "Digger" Dawson as well.

Frank's reply was as follows:

See page one of "Elderberries." Joan Witt is correct, it unofficially runs from the area of the Newell Bridge (Golding Street) to Jackson Street and should at the very minimum include portions of West Fourth, West Fifth and West Sixth.

From Page 1 of Elderberries:

One of the first subdivisions of the town to be laid out was the James Blakely addition . . . Surely the ambitious Blakely had visions of grandeur as he painstakingly put together his plan to make the community a mega-city.

Unfortunately, Blakely must not have recognized that the natural geographic boundaries created by the river, the hills and the sometimes laid-back attitude of the citizens would impede progress. He persisted, and in early November 1850, traveled by boat from Pittsburgh for the purpose of selling some 30 lots in the addition for a total of $4,550. Indeed, a hefty sum for him and his wife, Suzanne, to take home after having endured what was reported to be two days of bad weather.

It was at this sale that Patrick M. McNicol, Sr., an immigrant from County Donegal, Ireland, bought lot No. 383 for $98.10. He was one of many Irish Catholics who became part of the neighborhood.

After a fashion, a section of Blakely's plat, located between Jackson and Golding Streets, a short stretch running from the present Newell Bridge to City Hospital became known as "Irishtown."

The name of the neighborhood was derived from the heritage of its residents and the Catholic Church that was built on the corner of West Fifth and Jefferson Streets.

The church's name, St. Aloysius, was taken from the Patron Saint of Children, Aloysius Gonzaga, an Italian Jesuit, who lived between 1568 and 1591.

AT EAST LIVERPOOL, interest grew in obtaining a paper, and Jesse W. Harris, a printer with Clarke on The Wellsville Patriot," was persuaded by local developer John Blakely (brother of James) to launch a weekly.

John and James Blakely, well-to-do Pittsburghers, wanted to promote the city for investment, and had begun to purchase property here during a movement in the 1830s to build a railroad from Ashtabula to East Liverpool.

The proposed railroad did not materialize, but the Blakelys continued in real estate development, later entering the pottery industry and helping construction of the Cleveland to Pittsburgh railroad link from Wellsville to the city.

Financial aid for the new weekly was provided by John Goodwin Sr., a skilled pottery craftsman from Burslem, England, who had worked at Harker's pottery. Bennett's brothers also put up some money.

The following is from another mention of James Blakely in the East Liverpool Historical Society newspaper:

A negative answer was still given, for the reason he did not want to sell as it had been the homestead of his parents for many years and his mother was still living. The feelings of the family were duly appreciated, but the case was a desperate one. Both parties knew the offer was much more than the intrinsic value of the farm, but the one had a strong (family) reason for wishing to retain it, and the other with views entertained, considered the acquisition of the place essential to the salvation of the town, in whose interest I had labored for many years, and hence, with the infatuation of youthful lover, determined to leave no stone unturned to accomplish the assumed task, which I knew I could not do unless I obtained control of said farm. Having been a close observer of human nature, I knew I must make it to the interest of Mr. Hill to part with the farm, and make it so apparent that no one inheriting ordinary judgment could gainsay it. Rightly conjecturing Mr. Hill's unexpressed reasons for refusing so liberal on offer in money, I determined to procure a farm that Mr. Hill himself, or anyone else, would prefer as a farm to the one adjoining town. So I purchased the farm on which Mr. Hill now resides, and traded it for the one on which his infantile years were spent. The native grove of sugar maple trees were still standing, in which the syrup and sugar were made

36

that he remembers as among his chief joys when yet a lisping urchin. And now having, through a singular process and with unflagging effort gained the control of said farm, I anticipate its subdivision becoming happy homes of hundreds of the present generation and more to come. I was now proprietor of that portion of the ampitheatre where water was easily obtained, (which was the great want west of Market street.) I had but little doubt that from among my acquaintances in Pittsburgh, I could induce some to take hold of the land where there was a prospect of it becoming a railroad terminus. After the railroad company was incorporated, a meeting was held in Warren to elect president and directors. Gen. Perkins of Warren was elected president, Todd and Crowell, Colonel Hubbard of Ashtabula, and some others north of Warren, whose names I had forgotten, John Dixon of Columbiana, Aaron Brawdy, S. C. Hill, John Patrick and myself of East Liverpool, elected directors, with authority to open books at different points.

I was appointed to open books at Pittsburgh to receive subscriptions to the capital stock of the Ashtabula, Warnen and East Liverpool R.R. Co., and it happened just as I anticipated; it was only through making them interested in property at a low figure, that any could be induced to take stock in the road. I agreed to let Gen. William Robinson, a wealthy proprietor of Allegheny, have an undivided sixth, Geo. A Cook, a banker of Pittsburgh, one sixth, Laurence Mitchel (James Blakely's brother in law), one sixth, James Blakely, one twelfth, and R. Mansley, one twelfth of the farm spoken of above. I also sold to James Blakely and Co. fourteen acres of land north of Fifth, and west of Market Sts., and west and north of this fourteen acres they purchased a large tract of Claiborne Simms, Sr.'s, farm. All of these persons took

37

stock in the road, thus swelling East Liverpool's subscription. This being included, $200,000 were taken along the line of the road, and John Patrick went to New York and obtained subscriptions to the amount of $500,000 and more. The road was located and work was commenced on each end. The new town company having had the sugar tree grove cut into cordwood and removed from the river front of their farm proceeded to lay it off into lots from Union to College streets inclusive, and from front or water to Robinson Street inclusive. Cook and Robinson being able to do the most for the railroad, I having the management of laying off the addition, concluded to honor the individuals by name, naming a street for each of them, and yet neither of them proved to be of any service to the company, for about that time, Mr. Robinson, sniffing the coming monetary crash, transferred his claim, which he only held by article of agreement, not having yet paid for it, to Geo. A. Cook. So Cook became responsible for Robinson's railroad stock, and also responsible for one third the price of farm.

After he paid the first installment I made him a deed and took his note for future payments, but before the notes matured, the great monetary crash and panic of 1837 took place and Cook went by the board. He made an assignment classifying his creditors, and I being in the fourth class never received anything. Within two years, Cook died insolvent, and thus adding another evidence among thousands daily occurring of the uncertainty of riches. At the time Cook's notes were taken he owned a private bank, and was a stockholder in Merchants and Manufacturers Bank of Pittsburgh, and was considered worth not less than $200,000. So many banks and businessmen failing destroyed competence and caused an abrupt stagnation of business generally and

38

depreciated values from 50 to 75% generally, according to location and circumstances. Some of the rail road stockholders in the East failed, the company disbanded, the projected road was abandoned, and the town and its fourth prorietors went under a cloud, their Sun eclipsed for a season.

Although the purchase of the Wm. Hill alias Smith Farm did not cause the railroad to be built, yet it proved to be the medicament that saved the life of the town, as the sequel will show. Notwithstanding the temporary convalescence procured through efforts, and appliances made during the first half of the decade, the incidents which were related in previous lines, yet without the aids secured through the instrumentality of the aforementioned farm purchase, the shock of 1837 must have paralyzed the town almost if not quite beyond recovery as it were it took a decade of time to recover convalescence.

The mainspring of a watch operates all the inside machinery, but it needs some person to wind it up every 24 hours. In the case under consideration the farm proved to be the mainspring in a crude condition; it needed manipulating, formed into proper shape, placed in position and set to work, which was done. It was attached to the other machinery as previously stated, by distributing two thirds of it among Pittsburghers, which cause them in the first place to purchase all the available land adjoining town, in order that they let their friends have a portion, and thus increase the property influence among nonresidents, and thereby enhance the value of their own. And in the second place it caused them to influence an addition to the population, some of whom is true did not stay long, but others tarried for years and were useful citizens.

James Blakeley Esq., in order to have his brother, John S. Blakeley, take an interest in the place, bought four acres of land from S. C. Hill, eight acres from Philip Cooper, and a large tract from Claiborne Simms, Sr., in all of which his brother took an interest and become a prominent citizen, engaged both in merchandising and in manufacturing. The companys sale of lots in 1837 brought a number of a families from Pittsburgh and other places, some of whom improved their lots, and all helped to make a live town during the railroad excitement. When that went down, the "watch ceased to run for a time;" it had run down and needed winding up. But the hand that held the key was partially paralyzed by the financial shock of 1837. A new key was therefore needed and was at hand in a crude state, but required time to use it. The purchase and distribution of the land and lots, brought to the place among others, a certain Mr. Anthony Kearns, who is a very useful citizen, he bought and ran for a time the steam sawmill spoken of previously; he also bought and improved the place where the Hon. Josish Thompson resides. It also brought the honorable George Smith (now of Missouri). He built three brick houses and was otherwise the most consistent backer I had and gave efficient aid when most needed. (That was while the new key was being prepared.) It also brought Daniel and Jon Shook who put up two new buildings; Thomas Pratt, machinist, and James Bennett, Potter were drawn indirectly through the attractive influence it had disseminated. In fact with the exception of the population attracted by the improvements made in 1830 to 1835, the present population is there through the aforesaid influence.

Thos. Pratt was an ingenious mechanic, but lacked capital and encouragement in East Liverpool. After a few years residency moved to St. Louis, where he superintended the gasworks for many years, and then he and his son erected a gas works of their

39

own in Kansas City, Missouri.

James Bennett, the pioneer potter commenced working on the key perhaps as early as 1837, and for a time made such poor progress that he became discouraged. He said to Mr. George Smith, (who had bought my store and stand, corner of Second and Union Streets, where he and Matthew Thompson were then merchandising.

"I have experimented until I have neither money nor credit to buy a five cent loaf of bread or a pound of butter, and must quit." Mr. Smith said to him: "Bennett you must not give up; when you need anything to eat, send up your order; you can have credit with us until things go better for you."

Not many months elapsed until his brothers came and things did go better. Other workmen soon culminated at this point, key was ascertained to be of the proper material, and the skilled labor soon brought it into the required shape for a utility. (The metaphorical key is the potting business). The use of it set all the wheels of improvement in motion, and if skillfully manipulated, will keep them going for generations to come.

But I have anticipated too much and must go back and record events previous to the sale of lots by Smith, Blakely & Co., who at their own expense, constructed the Broadway wharf. In 1837 Mr. George Smith and myself purchased the farm of two hundred acres, at present owned by H. Crofts and Michael Fisher, (now Pleasant Heights). In 1838 they traded, Mr. George Smith, taking the store at the corner of Second and Union Streets, and I taking the entire farm lived on it one year, and then sold it to the Messers. Booth and Woodward. I then returned to town and built a warehouse

41

in front of where the First National Bank now stands, and a brick dwelling between it and the railroad depot. In 1842 Mr. George Smith went west, and settled there with his family the following year, and in about two years thereafter Mr. Kearns (his father-in-law) also moved to Missouri, Liverpool thus losing two enterprising citizens, and they losing largely on their properties by selling during a standstill while the new key was being molded and polished. However they mated up in the West, and what they called lost, was a gain to those who took their places, and as "God made of one blood all the nations of the earth," and hence it was all in the family, and really no loss at all. Mr. William Thompson Sr. purchased the store and dwelling of Mr. Smith and his son (Hon. Josiah Thompson) purchased Mr. Kearns' residence and now occupies the same, having made many improvements.

I have in previous lines recorded the "ups and downs" and hard struggles the town had for place among young cities of Ohio, from its earliest inception up to1837, including a few instances occurring at later periods. I being among the first crop produced within the 19th century, in retrospecting, I am astonished to find that my compeers of the first three decades have nearly all passed away. Within Liverpool Township, Joseph McKinnon is perhaps the only living witness to the earliest incidents recorded in the first part of my story. A few contemporaneous persons still survive at this date (1876), who were cognizant of the incidents related as having transpired from 1826 upward, among whom are William Davidson, Sr., and wife, widow Forbes, Bazil Simms Sr., C.R. Simms, Jonathon Purinton, Dr. Ogden, Enoch Bradshaw and wife, Thomas and Andrew Blythe, Isaac W. Knowles, M. Laughlin, John Smith, Sr., Joseph Carey, John Bagley and Hon. J. Thompson. In the country

42

are Geo. Anderson, Wm. Hill, widow Fisher, Samuel Fisher, James McCoy, John Montgomery; there may be a few others not remembered, or considered of later date, or less acquainted with the facts related. But the great mass born in the first decade of the present century have passed away and there are "more to follow."

It has been noticed that the main effort producing improvements of 1830-35 was the state road excitment, steam mills, boat yard, etc. The second impulse given to improvements was in 1836-37, vis: the railroad excitment and the formation of the new town company. The third and last with which I was connected resulted from the first and second, and from the progress of the potteries and from carrying out the new town plan as hereinafter related. The opening for navigation of the Sandy and Beaver canal cut Liverpool off from the forwarding and commission business that have been appertained to her, and otherwise interfered with her mercantile interests, hence I concluded to remove to Pittsburgh and try my luck in business there for few years, until it would be made manifest what the potting industry would do for Liverpool.

So in 1848, I rented my storeroom and dwelling to Jon S. Blakely & Co. and went to Pittsburgh where I formed a partnership with James Cummins, Esq., and carried on a wholesale produce and commission business for four years. My real estate interests in East Liverpool were still held however. Previous to my removal to Pittsburgh, the town company dissolved, each one taking his portion of the unsold lots, and likewise in the land, 45 acres remaining unsold. Fifteen acres would have been my remaining interest, but I accepted in lieu thereof, ten acres of the most desirable part through which Broadway now runs. But lots not being in demand during the fourth decade, and money being needed, I sold the land to Enoch Bradshaw, Esq., for $50 an acre, and when I returned in 1852, I repurchased it

43

excepting the block on which Bradshaws residence now stands, at I think, about $250 an acre; not that the land intrinsically worth that price but gave it for reasons somewhat similar to those influencing my first purchase from Mr. Hill. It will be remembered that the company had only laid out the lots and streets from the river to Robinson Street, and I foresaw necessity of that plan being carried out to the tanyard run, but the plat would cover lands owned by the following individuals; four acres owned by Thomas Blythe, four acres by Jon F. Smith, ten acres by Enoch Bradshaw, and six acres owned by Lawrence Mitchell. While residing in Pittsburgh I wrote to Mr. Bradshaw giving him my views on the propriety of carrying out the aforesaid plan, and requesting him to consult the other owners, and try to come to an agreement to have their lands valued, and then consolidate them into one tract, and lay it out as it is at present, but where there are "many men there are many minds." Nothing was accomplished till after my return from Pittsburgh in 1852, when I concluded that those lands must be brought under the control of one mind, or they would retard the progress of improvements for an indefinite period. I therefore approached Mr. Bradshaw on the subject of a re-conveyance of the ten acres of land. Mr. Bradshaw said he had bought it and built on it intending to make a permanent home; but Enoch you know is a clever fellow, and would not demur if asked to ride in a "flying chariot." He knows which side of his bread is buttered especially if it is spread pretty thick -- so after some pleasant talk unmixed with "hard cider," a bargain was concluded, and about the same time a bargain was made with Mr. Blythe for his four acres. Satisfactory arrangements were made with John F. Smith and Mr. Mitchell to have their land, platted on the same plan. S. C. Hill was engaged to survey and plat the new edition to correspond

44

with the company's first edition, so the plan originated by the fourth proprietor in 1837 was, after many struggles and anxieties, ultimately carried out in 1853 -- not to the profit of the proprietors but of utilitarian importance to the entire community, and now the little village flourishes and branches out like a "green bay tree;" no invidious comparison is intended, and yet the truth is sometimes spoken in jest. But from the reputed new churches already built, and those in prospect for the near future, I should judge the inhabitants to be religiously inclined, keeping their mental vision upon the maxim "to be truly great is to be truly good."

During my residence in Pittsburgh, I built up a snug trade and would have remained some years longer, but for three reasons. First, a cherished scheme for carrying out the town plan needed my presence. Second, Fred and Charles Hambright who were then and has been in business for year or two, occupying my store and residence, went into bankruptcy; third, Salt and Mear, among the largest potting firms in the place, were about leaving it, which would throw many operatives idle and otherwise have a discouraging influence. Although to drop my business and business connections in Pittsburgh would be a great sacrifice, yet I concluded to make it, hoping to save as much by attending to my interest in East Liverpool, personally, and at the same time aid in preserving in a healthy condition the pet of my infatuatas youthful love. With this in view, in connection with Benj. Harker, I took hold of the vacated Mansion Pottery, (an imprudent step for one having no practical knowledge of the business.) This diverted my capital attention to some extent from my legitimate mercantile business. On the eve of my leaving Pittsburgh, I told on[e] of my mercantile friends, Mr. Jon I. House, that I was about to return to East Liverpool, Mr. House replied, "don't you do it; re

45

consider your resolution, for last night I dreamed I saw you drowned right in front of East Liverpool, and though I put but little faith in most dreams yet I feel that it impressed upon my mind that you ought not to go." But I had made every preparation and taking the risk did go, and the result was after succeeding in extending the town plat as heretofor described and in potting and merchandising unto 1857, I became swamped and drowned in business point of view. Different causes produced the result; diversion of means, giving injudicious credits, the panic of 1857, etc.. My property sold in 1857-- 59 at a great sacrifice, and within three years thereafter was worth more than double the amount realized, and is now estimated at many times the price then realized, but as heretofor remarked the loss was a gain to others; and it being all in the family (human) of course it is all safe, only changed hands, and will soon do so again.

If my 40 years of active business life added anything to the happiness of the aggregate family, "then I have fulfilled my mission at least in a secular point of view, and have no regrets on that score, but continue to feel toward the place something like the Jews felt toward Jerusalem. When they were in Babylon-- they loved the place, whether in prosperity or adversity, and although the fourth proprietor now owns no real estate in the place, (except) a feather edge of river bank and beach between Broadway and College Street, which the council thinks I deeded to Corporation; (so the records will show;) yet it gives me pleasures to hear of the prosperity of the town. And now having, as I think, fulfilled my promises at the outset, permit a few suggestions.

A political axiom is that 'eternal vigilance is the price of liberty." I think it equally true, the cooperative efforts are essential to the prosperity of any community-- I allude

46

of course to public enterprises. With capital now accumulated in Liverpool Township, and with united effort, you should, to use the phraseology of Caleb and Joshua, "be fully able to go up and possess the land"-- that is, you are fully able to continue the prosperity and [growth and prosperity] of the place, an active and intelligent cooperation in procuring or wooing other industries or manufacturing enterprises to those already in operation. I have learned through the press that opportunities have been let pass by, for the want of diligence engineering and unity of action. With the proper effort, you should have had a railroad crossing at Babb's Island for a railroad to Pittsburgh, and a like connection with New Lisbon; also glassworks, ironworks, etc.

You need a pleasant drive on which to air your friends and talk business to them, when they come to see your beehive city. The township of St. Clair and Liverpool would scarcely feel the amount of tax necessary to make such a road between Liverpool and Calcutta. It should be macadamized with limestone; in fact all the avenues leading into the town should be improved -- township trustees and City Council should work harmoniously together in such improvements, being mutually interested. in 2011. 

Family

Susananna Smyth b. 15 September 1804, d. 12 November 1885
MARRIAGE*4 November 1827 He married Susananna Smyth, daughter of John Edward Smyth and Anna Margaret Ruffner, on 4 November 1827 at Pittsburgh, PA, From SLB's "Reminiscenses" My grandfather James Blakely, married Susan Smythe. Her mother was Barbara Ruffner, whose father was Simon Ruffner. The Ruffners came to western Virginia in the 17th century from Mainz, Germany. I have hanging in my home a picture which tradition says they brought with them. It represents the sorrowful mother and is very delicately pieced together of colored paper and gold. (Note: in 1999 Laura Glass acquired this when John R. Blakely died she willed it to give it to Stephens B. Woodrough, Jr) I have heard that Simon Ruffner and his brothers, Christian and George in the year 1797, gave to Father Carroll, afterwards first Bishop in the United States, the first piece of property owned by the Church, west of the Allegheny Mountains. I have made no search for documentary evidence of this. (Note from MVW - in fact there is a huge amount of evidence for this fact.)
The Ruffner family is still numerous and prominent in West Virginia. Colonel Ernest Ruffner of the U. S. Engineers, was stationed in Cincinnati at the time of his death. His daughter. Violet, married Lewis DeBus, now dead. She lives in Cincinnati (1956). I see her occasionally and we recognize our relationship.6,2 
Children
Last Edited23 Jun 2015

Citations

  1. He is called James "B" Blakely in his son-in-law's (Sebastian Wimmer) diary entry of November 6, 1876.
  2. [S34] John W. Jordan Pittsburg and Her People.
  3. [S463] "Sebastian Wimmer Diary,."
  4. [S8] Family information.
  5. [S32] "SLB Remembrances,."
  6. [S52] 1850 Census;.
  7. [S13] Allegheny County Immigrants.
  8. [S457] Charles J. Schaut, Early St. Marys.
  9. [S51] 1840 Census;.
  10. [S54] 1860 Census;, At the time his worth was only $600. but there were still two servants living with the family.
  11. [S54] 1860 Census;, LDS # 805,059 6th Ward Allegheny Co., Pittsburgh.
  12. [S55] 1870 Census;, Occupation for James shown as "Fire Insurance Agent."
  13. [S56] 1880 Census;.
  14. [S56] 1880 Census;, T9-1125 p. 429A.

Jane Ashton Blakely

F, #6, b. 20 December 1909, d. 29 September 2004
JANE ASHTON BLAKELY AT AGE 90
Jane's Art
Father*Stephens Laurie Blakely b. 23 Apr 1878, d. 24 Feb 1959
Mother*Jane DeValcourt Stamps Piatt b. 12 Mar 1882, d. 6 Oct 1928
RelationshipsGrandmother of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
Grandmother of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Landrum
De Calmes
PETER LANDRUM
SIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
JOSEPH WOODROUGH
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*20 December 1909 Jane Ashton Blakely was born on 20 December 1909 at 8:02 pm; Beechwood, Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY.1,2 
 She was the daughter of Stephens Laurie Blakely and Jane DeValcourt Stamps Piatt
Baptism6 February 1910 She was baptized on 6 February 1910 at Roman Catholic; St. Mary's Cathedral, Covington, Kenton County, KY, Sponsors were Frank and Margaret Tracy. (Her baptism certificate says sponsor is John Tracy.)1 
MARRIAGE*23 November 1935 She married John Randolph Woodrough, son of James (Jay) Richards Woodrough and Laura Alma Hollmeyer, on 23 November 1935 at Rectory Blessed Sacrament Church, Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY; Here is the description of her wedding:"The bride, who inherited the beauty for which the women of her mother's family - the Richardsons were noted, was never lovlier than in her wedding gown, which was worn by the groom's aunt, Mrs. W.F. Cochran, on her wedding day in 1898. It was deep ivory satin brocade fashioned with lace on tiny ruffles that outlined the bottom of the skirt and train. A tight separate bodice with long shirred sleeves and draped about the neck and shoulders with an exquisite Brussels lace bertha. She carried a bouquet of cream gardenias and valley lillies. It took place at Blessed Sacrament Rectory.3 
Divorce*May 1966 She and John Randolph Woodrough were divorced in May 1966 at Cincinnati, Hamilton County, OH; Copy of divorce filed in Kenton Circuit Court as well. At the time John lived at 1724 Madison Road in Cincinati. 
Death*29 September 2004 She died on 29 September 2004 at Pinellas County, FL, at age 94. 
ObituaryOctober 2004 Obnituary of Jane Ashton Blakely was Jane Blakely Woodrough, 94, of Largo, Fla., formerly of Fort Mitchell, died Wednesday at Sabal Palms Health Care Center in Largo.
She was a retired office manager with Chase Metals, and a member of Blessed Sacrament Church, Fort Mitchell, and St. Cecelia and St. Catherine churches in Largo.
Survivors include a son, Stephens B. Woodrough of St. Petersburg, Fla; daughters, Laura W. Steneck of Belleair, Fla., and Susan W. Purdy of Oakland Township, Mich; nine grandchildren and 20 great-grandchildren.
Services will be at the convenience of the family.
Hubbell Funeral Home, Belleair Bluffs, Fla., is handling arrangements. in October 2004. 
Burial*28 March 2005 She was buried on 28 March 2005 at St. Mary Cemetery, Ft. Mitchell, Kenton County, KY, Her family decided to wait until Spring to return her ashes to Kentucky. At that time they assembled the entire family for a wonderful weekend reunion. Jane would have been very pleased. 
Biography*  Stories from Mother
by
Laura Woodrough Glass

The Zoo Opera

     When mother was dating, she had a beaux that liked to take her to the Zoo Opera, over the river in Cincinnati. She recalls there was a balcony, where they served dinner, overlooking the stage and grandstands. A full opera, conducted orchestra and all, would be performed in the open “shell”. She referred to it as probably the first ‘dinner-theater’.
     During the performance, you could hear the roar of the big cats and the calls of the birds, especially the peacocks, and other inhabitants of the zoo.
My Sister, Susie

     Back in the days of which I speak, the theaters had ushers who would show the late comers to a seat in the darkened theater, using a low-light flashlight to indicate a particular row of seats for them to use. These same ushers would escort out anyone who made a disturbance, too.     

     On the occasion of one of Susie’s first dates, she was escorted to the movie. With the usher leading the way, then indicating two seats to them, Susie preceded her date, genuflected, made the sign of the cross, and entered the row of plush seats and sat down.

For Entertainment
     There was a small creek that ran through the property, known as “Beechwood”, where mother grew up.
     In the warm summer months the woods behind the house, and the creek, known as Pleasant Run, were their playground. She and her brothers would spend hours damming up the creek to make a swimming hole, but they never succeeded in building a dam high enough to make the water much more than a foot deep.

***

     “We would climb up on the shed roof, with our heads just at the peak, and lying down on our stomachs, we would spit on the tin roof. Whosoever spit would run off the end of the roof first was the winner. Makes my mouth dry just to think about it!”
Family Cars

     “Father had a 1920 Ford Runabout. Father would drive; mother sat in the middle, with John on her lap; I sat next to the door. We would leave the door open, and Steve would sit on the floor, with his feet on the running board. And that’s how we drove to church!”

***

     “When father got rich, he bought a Haines Touring car. It had a front seat, a back seat and two fold-out seats, that would fold down from the back of the front seat.
     It was an orphan immediately. (which means you couldn’t get replacement parts, so very few were made.) The transmission went out. Just made it to the Dixie Highway in low, shifted into second to the top of the hill, then coasted all the way downtown, getting as far as Pike Street. Then he shifted into low again to get to Pike and Main Streets, where the children would get out and walk the rest of the way to school, at 7th and Greenup, because they could walk, or run, faster than the car could get there.”

***

     “We all carried notes from our father which read ‘Please excuse John’s (Jane’s, Steve’s) tardiness.’ Nothing more, no reason given! We should have had them mimeographed because we carried them almost daily!”

***

     “Father was not reliable when it came to getting someplace on time. He would get up, bathe, shave and dress; come downstairs, eat a leisurely breakfast and read the morning paper while we were all ‘champing at the bit’ to leave.”

***

     “Father fancied himself a gentleman farmer. He built a three room house on the back of the farm (“Beechwood”) and a man, wife and 4 children moved into it. He was supposed to put in the garden. He was paid $50. a month, besides.
     I remember the crop of potatoes, stored in the basement - was a dirt floor then - and each night before dinner one of us would be sent downstairs to select potatoes for the evening meal. By the end of the winter it was hard to find potatoes that hadn’t grown leaves or rotted.”

***

     “We all had chores to do. We had a cow that we had to milk twice a day; morning and night, and it was always dark. It was my job to hold her tail, John held the lantern and Steve milked the cow.
     The boys had to mow the grass and I had inside chores; dusting down the front and back stairs and under all the beds. We didn’t have carpeting upstairs then, just wood floors.”

***

     “Father was a great story teller. He had a big, wing chair that was on rockers; and instead of a dog at his feet, he had children. He would sit in his chair, after dinner, and he would make up stories to tell us........like the one about the “little people” that lived under the house who would come up through a trap door in the dining room at night.”

***
My First Dog

     “I was downtown, on Scott Street, one day when I met a schoolmate who had a puppy she wanted to get rid of. The puppy was about 5 months old, had a collar and leash. So I dragged that puppy all the way to the car stop, carried it onto the street car, and dragged it all the way down the street, home - and told father it followed me home. Father said ‘We’ll have no female dogs.’ and I said ‘It’s not female. It’s name is Jack.’ Sure enough Jack was female. She had 6 puppies the first litter and 11 the second. At one time we had 18 dogs running around that place. But an outbreak of distemper hit the area and they all died.”

* * *

My Uncle Laurie

     “Uncle Laurie was an inventor, you know. He had stuff all over the house that he had invented. One of his inventions was a gadget hooked up to the alarm clock in his bedroom. At the preset hour, the alarm bell, which sounded like a fire alarm, would go off, the covers would be pulled down and the window would shut. That way, he’d be sure to get up!
     One night his sister has some friends over to spend the night, and they slept in that room. In the morning, at the preset hour, the alarm goes off, the covers go flying, the window shut, and the girls scattered in all directions, screaming and hollering.
     He never had his invention patented.

* * *

     “After Laurie and Frances had moved into Lexington, I used to go down and stay with them.
     One time I got up early in the morning and discovered one of his ‘inventions’. He had rigged up a mat under the rug that set off bells as loud as fire alarms, and flashing lights and I had unknowingly set off his own private burglar alarm!”

* * *

     “When the old farm house caught on fire, people came from all over the town; from as far away as Ft. Mitchell. They’d get in their cars, and drive over, just to see if they could help. There were no fire departments in those days, so the house couldn’t be saved; but they saved what furniture and belongings they could. John was just 5 days old. Mother put him in a laundry basket and set him in the middle of Beechwood road.”


“Beechwood”

     The original house burned down, when John was just 5 days old, and we lived in a tar-paper shack until the new house was built. “Beechwood” was rebuilt in about 1912, an imposing Colonial structure of orange-red brick, with four huge, round, wooden white columns, and green painted shutters. Originally, the front porch was wooden and later replaced by the concrete porch that’s there today. Across the front porch there were large, wooden rockers, with woven backs and seats, and painted white. The house sits back from the road, up on a small hill. A winding driveway from the street ending in a circle by the side of the porch. Along the front of the property is a white board fence, extending from the driveway, along the road, to the creek.

     There are three floors in the house. The third “floor”, as it was always called, consists of two rooms. The larger one overlooked the woods through two small, quarter-circle windows, and the smaller one, with a window overlooking the driveway. There were two little closets, just at the top of the stairs, that were used for storage, as well as cubby-holes under the eves, in the larger room. But there was no plumbing. This is where the boys slept; Steve and Courtney in the larger room, John in the small one. If they got up during the night, they had to go all the way down to the bathroom on the first floor, under the front stairs. They weren’t allowed to use the bathroom next to the master bedroom, which was just at the foot of the “third floor” stairs!
     
     On the second floor are four rooms. The master bedroom, with a coal burning fireplace, a large walk-in closet and two huge windows, one looking out over the front porch and lawn, the other on the side, looking out over the woods and creek. The one bathroom, at that time, adjoined the master bedroom with entrance doors from both the hall and the bedroom. It wasn’t until much later that the second shower room was added. The small room next the master bedroom was originally a bedroom. ‘When I was recovering from influenza, I slept in there; and mother could hear me coughing all night,’ mother recalls. This room was later converted into a “book room” and study, and through small French doors was a balcony, with a black iron railing and gray wooden floor. In the middle of the hall, at the top of the stairs, is a large linen closet, with double wooden doors. The other two bedrooms, one larger than the other, take up the other side of the second floor. The front room, with two more large windows, over looking the front porch and lawn and the driveway on the side, was used as a guest bedroom or an infirmary, if one of the children were sick. ‘I slept in the back bedroom; in a big double bed with Gran. When I got sick, I moved into the front bedroom and a nurse stayed with me. After I got well again, I got to stay in the front bedroom, and Gran stayed in the smaller room. When mother died, Gran moved to Nicholasville to live with her brother. And when father married again, I had to give up my room to Page and Margaret, and I took the back bedroom. Wyk went upstairs with the boys.’

     The first floor of “Beechwood” has a formal entry hall; a lavatory located under the “front” stairs, and the back stairs off to the right. A formal dining room, with silver chandelier; and two light, airy windows. A swinging door leads back to the kitchen, and a gray wooden porch is just outside the kitchen door. The ceilings are high, at least 15 feet, in every room. The formal front parlor, with three tall, double sash windows; an enormous wood burning fireplace, with a broad white mantelpiece the focal point of the room. A cut crystal chandelier hangs from the ceiling, with tiny silk shades on the electric candlesticks. The French doors lead out onto a porch on the back of the house. ‘In the 50’s, I think it was, the back porch was torn off, as was the wooden porch outside the kitchen door, and the ‘back parlor’, a small study, and the sun porch were added to the back of the house.’ So now the French doors lead into the back parlor; the end of the front hall goes into the study; and a door on the right goes out onto the sun porch. There is another fireplace, with white marble mantle; and three tall windows looking out on the back lawn and down into the woods.

     The coal burning furnace has long since been replaced, but the coal room and coal chute are still there. And the “stone room” is now the storage area for garden and power tools.
 
Residence1935 She lived in 1935 at 239 Stewart Ave, Waukegan, Lake, IL
Married NameMay 1966  As of May 1966,her married name was Woodrough. 
Employment*1970 She was employed by Chase Brass and CopperInventory control Manager - Chase Metals - division of BP America in 1970 at Chase Brass and Copper, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, OH.4 
Retirement*1971 She was retired in 1971.4 
Residence1995 She lived in 1995 at 116 Beechwood Rd., Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY; "Beechwood" was the only place she called home until she moved to Florida in 1997. 
Residence*1998 She lived in 1998 at Belleair, Pinellas County, FL; She lived there with her daughter Laura W. Glass.4
JANE BLAKELY WOODROUGH
FAMILY
JANE BLAKELY WOODROUGH
JANE ASHTON BLAKELY
WEDDING

Family

John Randolph Woodrough b. 26 July 1909, d. 8 August 1970
MARRIAGE*23 November 1935 She married John Randolph Woodrough, son of James (Jay) Richards Woodrough and Laura Alma Hollmeyer, on 23 November 1935 at Fort Mitchell, KY; Here is the description of her wedding:"The bride, who inherited the beauty for which the women of her mother's family - the Richardsons were noted, was never lovlier than in her wedding gown, which was worn by the groom's aunt, Mrs. W.F. Cochran, on her wedding day in 1898. It was deep ivory satin brocade fashioned with lace on tiny ruffles that outlined the bottom of the skirt and train. A tight separate bodice with long shirred sleeves and draped about the neck and shoulders with an exquisite Brussels lace bertha. She carried a bouquet of cream gardenias and valley lillies. It took place at Blessed Sacrament Rectory.3 
Divorce*May 1966 She and John Randolph Woodrough were divorced in May 1966 at Cincinnati, OH; Copy of divorce filed in Kenton Circuit Court as well. At the time John lived at 1724 Madison Road in Cincinati. 
Child
Last Edited25 Apr 2016

Citations

  1. [S17] SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.
  2. [S35] Lendrum Blakely.
  3. [S77] Unknown subject unknown repository.
  4. [S8] Family information.

John Ruffner Blakely

M, #40, b. 4 November 1911, d. 2 April 1999
Father*Stephens Laurie Blakely b. 23 Apr 1878, d. 24 Feb 1959
Mother*Jane DeValcourt Stamps Piatt b. 12 Mar 1882, d. 6 Oct 1928
RelationshipsGranduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
Granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Landrum
De Calmes
PETER LANDRUM
SIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*4 November 1911 John Ruffner Blakely was born on 4 November 1911 at Beechwood, Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY, When John was eleven days old the house burned according to SLB diary.1,2 
 He was the son of Stephens Laurie Blakely and Jane DeValcourt Stamps Piatt
Baptism3 December 1911 He was baptized on 3 December 1911 at Roman Catholic; St. Marys Cathedral, Covington, Kenton County, KY, SLB Date diary gives baptisim date as Dec. 3, 1911 with sponsors as Lilly Hudson Lendrum and Laurie J. Blakely. 
MARRIAGE*14 August 1966 He married Jane Grant on 14 August 1966 at Ft. Mitchell, Kenton County, KY
Obituary1999 Obnituary of John Ruffner Blakely was (Newspaper obituary from the Cincinnati Enquirer, dated April 10, 1999, pg B8)
BLAKELY          John R., beloved husband of the late Jane Grant Blakely, father of Marc J. Reardon, Marde R. O'Meara, Mary R. Langenbrunner and Patricia J. Reardon, grandfather of Marc Reardon, Mathew Reardon, Brooke L. Reardon, Amy O'Meara, Cary O'Meara, Adam Langenbrunner and Baird Langenbrunner, brother of Jane B. Woodrough. Resident of Ft. Mitchell, KY April 2, 1999, age 87 years. Mass of Christian Burial, Tuesday, April 13th, Blessed Sacrament Church 2415 Dixie Hwy., Ft. Mitchell, KY at 1P.M. Interment St. Mary Cemetery, Ft. Mitchell, KY Friends may call from 11 A.M. until 12:45P.M. Tuesday at the church. Memorial may be made to the Christopher Gist Historical Society, Attn: Mrs. Alice Kennelly Roberts, 443 Farrell Dr., Ft. Wright, KY 41011. Allison & Rose Funeral Home, Inc., Robbins St. and Madison Ave., Covington serving the family. in 1999. 
Death*2 April 1999 He died on 2 April 1999 at Emphysima, Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY, at age 87 John died on "Good Friday" if one didn't know better it would be realistic to think he chose this particular day. How like him. 
Burial*13 April 1999 He was buried on 13 April 1999 at St. Marys Cemetery, Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY, John R. Blakely - As We Remember Him
     "To Live in the Hearts of Those We Have Loved and Leave Behind is Not to Die"
And so it is with John Blakely - a man I always knew and loved simply as: Unca John.
     On behalf of John's sister (my mother), Jane Woodrough, and her other children (my sisters), Laura Glass and Susan Powner, and an behalf of my own children and those of my sisters, I would like to spend a few moments to share our feelings of both sadness and joy to all those who mourn his loss with us today, and to briefly search back into our memories for a few more glimpses into some of the times and places where our lives were touched (and maybe even changed) by John.
     Love is a timeless subject pondered by great authors and poets. It's a feeling which is not easy to put into mere words. The same is true for the related emotions of loyalty, trust, compassion, courage, resolve, and joy itself - to name only a few of the human passions which mirrored both the spiritual and personal character of John Blakely. Unca John was all of these to me, and I'm sure - to all of us at one time or another. John loved life, and he lived it as completely and as fully as his being permitted. As many of here today have seen and experienced first-hand, John was never satisfied with mediocrity or doing anything in a half-hearted manner. If anything was worth doing, he did it to the hilt, and he did it with an unfailing passion.
     He was intensely loyal to his friends and to anyone who put their name on the line for him; he was kind-hearted and compassionate; and he was profoundly committed to the principles of absolute integrity and trustworthiness. The same is true regarding his strength of character and personal bravado. Indeed, there were frequent occasions when John would truly "push the envelope" to demonstrate the intensity of his personal grit and resolve.
     Sometimes his determination and commitment was so pronounced (but either unfocused or focused on the wrong objective) that it bordered on the comical. And yet, you dared not snicker or even crack a smile lest he think you thought he was being a silly - which, of course, was the case, but you still couldn't say anything because, as he was always so careful to make very clear: he was dead serious about it! I have a vivid recollection of one such occasion.
     John loved the outdoors and camping. One of his favorite expressions was to ask everyone as a group - frequently at a precise moment in time when events were not going exactly as planned - "Mr. Scoutmaster, are we all having fun yet?" My guess is that it probably reminded him of his boyhood camping escapades. In any event, I was lucky enough to go on one of his great outdoor adventures with a couple of his friends. I was about 15 at the time, and as I recall we had been camped overnight in sleeping bags somewhere on the banks of the Kentucky River on a fishing trip. It was very early in the morning - before sunrise. John had gotten up first and was in the process of making a fire when I first woke up. I remember that everything was very wet and muddy, and there was even a light mist in the air. But John was not deterred. He got the fire going - barely - and proudly announced that he was going to cook breakfast for all of his fellow camp-mates, of which there were 4 of us, including John.
     The next hour or so was classic John Blakely. First there was the smoldering fire, which never did give off much heat, but produced enough smoke to choke everyone within 50 yards. There was smoke everywhere, and every time John moved out of the way, it followed him. He began by first making intermittent strange noises under his breath, then he started muttering various unrepeatable words and phrases, and finally he shook his stick at the fire - warning it that he would "kill it" if it didn't cooperate. Somewhat petrified, I asked if there was anything I could do. Get more wood - preferably dry wood was his reply. When I returned to the scene, I found that John had put a whole package of bacon strips into a large black iron skillet on the fire. It was mesmerizing theater. The smoke continued to roar in his face while he continued his circular dance around the fire, and the big skillet slowly filled up with grease.
     Then the "grand idea" struck John like a truck: "Why don't we use some of this excess grease to get the fire going?" Hearing no objection from anyone who valued their well-being, John proceeded to pour some of the grease into the fire. It worked all- right! The flames leapt up around the skillet and John's arm and most of his right side, producing a great flash of light and a whooshing sound, and throwing a light sprinkling of ash all over John and the bacon in the skillet. After making sure his hair wasn't on fire, John calmly reassured everyone that wood ash is "nature's pepper" and would make everything taste better.
     The bacon finally got to the point where it was declared safe to eat. It was somewhere between almost deep-fried and burned. Some pieces were crispy brown on one end and kind of slimy grey on the other. Never mind. It was time to fry the eggs. John boldly took orders. "How do you want them cooked, sunny side up, over easy or hard, or just plain scrambled?" Just at about the time the first order went into the pan, a light rain began to fall. I won't belabor the story much further, except to say that it was at that point that John made a command decision: "Men," he said, "I hope everyone likes scrambled eggs, because we just ran out of all the others."
     In less than a minute, John added another half dozen eggs to those already in the skillet, and began to stir the contents as though he were mixing cement. By this time, it is raining in earnest. But John was not to be denied. He stayed out there fixing those eggs while the rest of us retreated to whatever shelter we could find. For the next 10 minutes - it seemed like hours at the time - John stayed with his mission doing his determined best holding a raincoat over his head while trying to cook eggs over a dying fire in a rainstorm! As I said, it was classic John Blakely when he finally (an proudly) served soggy breakfast with his familiar refrain: "Mr. Scoutmaster, are we all having fun yet?"
     John was many different things to all of us. He was my mother's big brother and a surrogate father to my sisters and me after our father left and pursued a different role in life. That was in 1952, and I will be indebted to John forever for his caring, for his generosity, for his willingness to listen to my problems, for his wisdom, and for his inspiration to name only a few of the gifts he bestowed upon me. This is not to say that John was easy-going or any type of pushover. Anyone who knew John also knew he was a tough disciplinarian. John had (and followed) certain rules. Some of them reflected 19th century social standards, but that didn't make them wrong. For the most part, John had it right, and I'm very grateful for the positive influence he had on my life.
     As I prepared for this occasion today, I tried to think of what I would call the most defining and memorable moment in my relationship with John. It was not an easy task, but it really didn't take long for me to recall that moment. It happened when I was finishing my first year of law school at UK in Lexington. My performance in the classroom was satisfactory, but (as usual) I wasn't setting any records. Actually, of course, I was doing more playing than studying. I even tried working part-time at Keeneland. I thought everything was OK. While I was home for Easter and the spring- break, John was visiting and asked me to go with him on an errand for my mother. When we got to the store, he parked and I started to get out. "Stay in here for a second, I want to talk to you." I could tell instantly from the tone of his voice that he was deadly serious. I was absolutely stunned and totally blind-sided. For the next 5 minutes, John proceeded to tell me how important my schooling was; how poorly I was applying myself; how disappointed he and my mother were that I took a job at Keeneland (I never learned how he found out); et cetera, et cetera. He said and did all the right things. His voice was calm but firm; he reinforced my confidence by praising my abilities, and he focused on the long term goals of self-fulfillment and my desire to pursue a career as a trial lawyer. And then he ended the monologue as abruptly as it started by looking me squarely in the eye and promising that he would personally beat me to a pulp if I didn't get my act together. It made an indelible impression and taught me the most important lesson of my life.
     Some of the coincidences in John's life made some of us think he might have a special connection with his Maker. For example, John waited for almost 55 years before marrying his first true love, Janie - God rest her soul. I don't know how many times I heard various members of his family chide him over the years for getting such a late start on raising his own family. It almost became a family tradition at each wedding: "Well, John, when are you going to have a party." Finally, that day arrived in August of 1966. Everyone was so excited. John Blakely was really going to do it; he was going to get married. Everything was proceeding smoothly as planned until disaster struck toward the end of an otherwise beautiful and unmarred ceremony. Just as the priest opened the tabernacle to distribute Holy Communion, the church's theft alarm went off. It was the loudest, longest, and most persistent ringing alarm I had ever heard. It must have taken 10 full minutes for the nuns to scurry from their convent quarters down the long aisle of St. Agnes church to turn it off! We can only guess what must have been running through John's and Janie's minds as they stood there patiently at the altar as the alarm continued to sound its incessant ringing. But some of us even thought (privately, of course) that John might have arranged it to mark the occasion with another memorable moment.
     My bet is that John probably also had something to do with the last memorable coincidence of his life. I'm not being disrespectful here, because John took his relationship with God very seriously. He loved God with his whole heart, mind and soul, and he lived his full life accordingly. But I still think it was a little presumptuous of John to ask Him to take him on the same day His Son died on the cross. Good Friday, therefore, will always be an extra special day for me.

     I know as certain as I'm standing here today that as John looks into the eyes of his Scoutmaster, he doesn't have to ask if he having a good time. He is finally there, and he is very alive for the rest of time. 
FUNERAL13 April 1999 He was buried from. 
Confirmation*9 May 1926 He was confirmed on 9 May 1926; Sponsor at Confirmation listed as "Laurie". Presumably this is Laurie Blakely. 
Employment9 March 1937 He was employed on 9 March 1937 at Attorney; Admitted to Kentucky Bar.1 
Employment*1985 He was employed in 1985 at Attorney, Covington, Kenton County, KY.3 
Residence*24 April 1990 He lived on 24 April 1990 at 116 Beechwood Rd., Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY
Note*1 September 1998 He September 1, 1998 We may have seen John Ruffner Blakely for the last time and what an experience! I am writing this as we fly east to Pittsburgh Pennsylvania – a trip of forty minutes. My intention is to visit East Liverpool Ohio tomorrow to seek the truth to all those stories of Blakely millions lost when the cemetery land was abandoned by the city, but that is another story. What a beginning it is to the Pittsburgh odessy to stop off in Covington, KY to visit John Ruffner Blakely at his retirement home.
It’s hard to believe that the Blakely life that has been spread on the floor in front of me in St Petersburg Florida for the past six years has distilled down to this present scene. Beechwood’s attic was “cleaned” out when John entered the nursing home early this year and pictures from almost one hundred years of living found their way to my home in Florida. The pictures tell a story of a young man’s (Stephens L. Blakely) rise from serious student through the years of establishing his profession, family and particularly his home at Beechwood. John Ruffner Blakely is the only surviving son and years ago he came into possession of Beechwood after a trying “fuss” with the other heirs.
John has left Beechwood forever and moved into a retirement home. The family worked so hard in support of the home and now what remains barely fills the two tiny rooms that are John’s life in the nursing home.
As the plane crosses the Ohio River at dusk I reflect on the old family pictures and the story they tell. John was a distinctive looking child – his face was always easy to pick out in any picture. One picture in particular shows him as a dapper young soldier standing next to papa on the porch of Beechwood.
His life at the nursing home is like the skinny dehydrated geranium I notice on the window of his apartment. The poor plant sits by the window desperately clinging to life with two blossoms pitifully adjoining one another; one dead and the other clinging to the least remnant of a blossom. The plant gazes longingly out the window toward the small spot of summer color in the bed of droopy-necked sunflowers and sunny yellow marigolds. This potted plant is a last garden patch for a gardener who won’t give up - yet.
For years John slept in his father’s bed with the high headboard. Among the few items that followed him to the nursing home were the bed and a chest of drawers. The bed once looked so grand at Beechwood. Yet, in its present home it reminds me of the graves at Stoke Poges in England with their markers shaped like the head and footboards of beds.
(We are coming close to Pittsburgh now. Below me I see the Monagahelia with a large island) this is where the Blakely family got its start when they arrived from England in the early part of the 19th century.
The wall of John’s apartment holds remembrances - a distillation of the family. There is the Ruffner relic, a picture said to have been brought from Germany by the first Ruffner settler. Another wall holds the DeValcourt coat of arms; a proclamation from the town of Covington naming a day in June 1997 as “John Blakely Day” for his work with the Christopher Gist Society. The room is full of other objects. In the corner stand two very large oxygen tanks; there is a sofa from Beechwood with a cover that is full of soil from the multitude of coal fires burned in the fireplace.
SBW and I had only an hour to visit with John from 4:30 to 5:30. We had Page’s wedding album and showed it to John. (John touched each picture). John shared his scrapbooks with us then suddenly announced he needed to go eat. How like John! We drop in out of the sky for a one hour visit and John who doesn’t eat much anyway and could eat anytime decides to interrupt the visit to go eat!
John’s sister Jane Ashton B. Woodrough is on her way later this week to visit him. For some reason she feels the need to come in spite of the way he enticed her to give up her home without reimbursement and move in with him and then “evicted” her when it suited him. He has always been self-centered and egotistical without much thought to the feelings of others.
Beechwood is going to his adopted son Mark who is the beneficiary of Jane’s abandonment of her life estate in her home on the Beechwood property. She won’t be around to interfere with his life and yet no one seems to realize that there should be some sort of monetary consideration given to her. This is so typical of the family.

John smoked all his life and now pays the price by being burdened by emphysema. Most of the time he is connected to the huge oxygen tank in the corner by a very long plastic tube that lies snarled on the floor. In a manner so typical of John, he tried to give SBW directions to go see someone down the hall. He got up from the very soiled red sofa and walked across the curled up pile of oxygen hose without taking time to untangle it. Mercifully he didn’t trip, but instead walked out the door dragging the snarl, lets the door slam, gets yanked back sharply and curses as he yanks the tube from his nose and throws it on the hall floor. Such typical John behavior. During our conversation he tells us the place costs 5cents a minute –again only John would have this figured out.
As we leave John remarks that we look as good as we did the day we married. He is right – we do. We escaped by the skin of out teeth and made a life away from Beechwood, Covington and the old family ways. Steve mutters “Don’t ever let me get like that”

Now as we land in Pittsburgh I reflect that it all started here (or at least the part we know). As I gaze at the plane cabin with interior lights and gently floating cabin attendants I think of the scene in 2001 space odessy. Our life which seems so common to us would look just as surreal as the Kubrick movie to James Blakely and Susan Smythe those Pittsburgh pioneers who were so prominent here, lost everything and returned to the country life of Elk Co., Pennsylvania in the town of St. Marys. (Special note - during our trip to Pittsburgh we were able to visit East Liverpool and see the actual places so important in James Blakely's life. We finally unravelled the Great Land story "Blakely Loses Millions" and it is recounted in full under James Blakely's story.
Note: while John was at dinner I took two pieces of paper and quickly wrote notes to aid me in the narrative. Here are the notes:Dirty red sofa; Note from his wife Jane on dresser; 1998 Blakely calendar (business);
Notes on door “Bath Wed. and Sat.”; Pappy’s bed (after John's death it would be given to Stephens B. Woodroug, Jr.);Stonewall Jackson picture;Ruffner picture (it went to Laura Steneck and will eventually go to Stephens B. Woodrough, Jr.);Beechwood picture with Strom Thurmon; And the piece de resistance on the counter in the kitchen a gallon of Kentucky Bourbon (John doesn’t drink any more.)

September 2, 1999
As I print this it seems a good time for a footnote. John did die on Good Friday of 1999. Steve, Laurie, Jane Ashton and Susie attended the funeral. Several weeks following his death Stephens B. Woodrough Jr., and Elena made the trip to Beechwood to bring Pappy’s bed (SLB) which had actually originally belonged to Laurie J. Blakely to their new home in Atlanta. It is magnificent and was well worth the trip for them. In the same room they have the portrait of Laurie J. Blakely hanging and call it the “Laurie Room”. How fun! Laura Glass brought the Ruffner picture to Florida and had it reframed. And we did indeed visit East Liverpool and make many discoveries. In addition I had a Eureeka moment at the Pittsburg Library when I found “Historic Pittsburgh and Her People” with new information about the Blakely family. on 1 September 1998. 

Family

Jane Grant d. 14 July 1980
MARRIAGE*14 August 1966 He married Jane Grant on 14 August 1966 at Ft. Mitchell, KY
Last Edited7 Sep 2009

Citations

  1. [S17] SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.
  2. [S35] Lendrum Blakely.
  3. [S8] Family information.

John Simpson Blakely1

M, #185, b. circa 1812, d. 12 February 1877
JOHN SIMPSON BLAKELY
JOHN SIMPSON BLAKELY AND HIS SON.
Father*(?) Blakely b. c 1785, d. b 1830
Mother*Sarah or Alice (?) b. 1781, d. 8 Jul 1854
Relationships3rd great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
3rd great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsBLAKELY
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*circa 1812 John Simpson Blakely was born circa 1812 at England Family stories say that the Blakelys came from Blackburn, Lancashire, England. There is evidence in a list of immigrants applying for naturalization showing that William and James Blakely arrived in 1819/1820. Same record does not show John Simpson or the three boy's parents. However, we know from family stories that John Simpson was their brother.

Date of birth could be 1809 according to notes of SLB who says that John S. Blakely died in 1877 at age 68. 
 He was the son of (?) Blakely and Sarah or Alice (?)
Baptism20 July 1828 He was baptized on 20 July 1828 at Roman Catholic; St. Patrick/St. Paul, Pittsburgh, PA, "Johannes Blakely 18 years old, Anabaptist convert" - note age not consistant with birthdate. Should look at original record. Note that "Latinized" names were used in the church records.2 
MARRIAGE*22 August 1833 He married Jemima Cecelia Fortune, daughter of Walter Fortune and Ann Craft, on 22 August 1833 at St. Patrick, Pittsburgh, PA, Witness were Luca and Francisca Fortune (likely her brother and sister); SLB's date diary gave date at Aug 25 1833.3
JOHN SIMPSON BLAKELY
Death*12 February 1877 He died on 12 February 1877 at St. Louis, MO, Newspaper notice reads: Tuesday evening Feb. 12 of Congestive apoplexy in his sixty-sixth year.
The little tag under his pencil portrait gives year of death as 1871. I suspect this is a typo. Its likely that SLB had the plates installed on the picture frames when he acquired them.3,4 
FUNERAL*February 1877 He was buried in February 1877 at St. Malachi, St. Louis, MO; Funeral services at St. Malachi's church corner of Summit and Clark at 9:30. Mentions son Walter. Presume this is in St. Louis. Died Tuesday eveing Feb. 12 (no year given).5 
Burial2 March 1878 He was buried on 2 March 1878 at Calvery Cemetery, St. Louis, MO, 150498 CALVARY JOHN S BLAKELEY M Mar 02 1878 66 Something is wrong here. His age at death is given as 66 when he was actually 74. Also note day of death and day of burial. Something not right.6 
Residence1834 He lived in 1834 at Pittsburgh, PA; John S. is mentioned several times in the Historic Pittsburgh website in connection with banking in Pittsburgh, 1834 (he was married in 1833); the Pittsburgh Institute of Arts & Sciences (was an officer - Vice Pres.); was a member of the common Council, West Ward in 1838......(1837 City Dir. of Pitts.) 
Anecdote1834  ST. ALOYSIUS PARISH
235 West Fifth Street
East Liverpool, OH 43920
(330) 385-7131
(330) 385-3025
BRIEF HISTORY of St. Aloysius
In the home of John Blakely, Rev. James Conlan of Steubenville first offered Mass in 1834.
The first church was dedicated in 1845 but within the year was destroyed by fire.
Once again John Blakely offered his house for worship. During the pastorate of Rev. James Monahan a second church was constructed, all timber being framed in Pittsburgh and floated down the Ohio River.
Rev. James Cullen was appointed first pastor in 1874.
The first school was established in the rectory in 1885; the second floor serving as convent. The present school was built by Rev. Thomas Smythe in 1901. The present church of Roman esque design was completed in 1889. 
Anecdote1834  In 1834 at East Liverpool, Columbiana County, OH, The following describes the Blakely interest in the establishment of the Catholic Church in western Pennsylvania
St. Aloysius Church
     "Through the kindness and generosity of John Blakely a loyal Catholic an prominent local citizen in the village of East Liverpool, a large and spacious room in his home was made available for church services. It was in this room in 1834 that the Reverend James Conlan of Steubenville first administered spiritual guidance to the ten Catholic families of the village. With few exceptions, services continued to be held for the next sixteen years at this location. As early as 1837, Father Conlan had encouraged his parishioners to plan for the erection of a church. However, the panic of 1837 delayed its construction until aid was obtained from local and outside sources. The plans were realized in 1845, when the structure was completed. The joy of the parishioners was changed to sadness when, on Passion Sunday of the same year, a fire completely destroyed the structure. John Blakely helped to soften this demoralizing blow by again offering his home as a place of worship. In the meantime, Father Conlan, who had been transferred in 1842 to St. Paul Church near Dungannon, continued to serve St. Aloysius. During the pastorate of the Reverend James Monahan, a second church was erected on the site of the present building. All the timber for the building was framed in Pittsburgh, then floated on a raft down the Ohio River to East Liverpool, where it was assembled. In November, 1874, a Reverend James Cullen was appoint d as the first resident pastor. Father Patrick McGuire, his successor, built the first rectory. ln November 1879, Fath er John Carroll was appointed pastor. About 1885, Father Carroll established the first school by converting the rectory into a school building. Class rooms were on the ground floor; the second floor served as a convent. The present school, one of the finest in these parts, was built in 1901 by the Reverend Thomas Smythe. In 1887, Father Carroll moved the old church to the rear of the present church site. Then was begun the construction of the beautiful St. Aloysius edifice as we have it today. The church, completed in 1889, was dedicated on October 5, 1890, by the Right Reverend Monsignor Felix Boff, V. G. The brick structure is of Romanesque design. In 1914, the building was stuccoed. There are two corner-stones, one of which came from the second church structure. It reads: "A.D. 1851." The other has the inscription: "Ecclesia Sancti Aloysii."

ST. ALOYSIUS PARISH
235 West Fifth Street
East Liverpool, OH 43920
(330) 385-7131
(330) 385-3025
BRIEF HISTORY of St. Aloysius
In the home of John Blakely, Rev. James Conlan of Steubenville first offered Mass in 1834.
The first church was dedicated in 1845 but within the year was destroyed by fire. Once again John Blakely offered his house for worship. During the pastorate of Rev. James Monahan a second church was constructed, all timber being framed in Pittsburgh and floated down the Ohio River.
Rev. James Cullen was appointed first pastor in 1874.
The first school was established in the rectory in 1885; the second floor serving as convent. The present school was built by Rev. Thomas Smythe in 1901. The present church of Roman esque design was completed in 1889.
 
Residence*1839 He lived in 1839 at East Liverpool, OH
Employment*1839  In 1839 at Pottery Manufacturer; Woodward, Blakely and Company, East Liverpool, Columbiana County, OH, "Woodward and Blakely" that was called an "ambitious firm" among the early potters of East Liverpool. They came with other potters from Staffordshire, England. Woodward, Blakely and Company were called the wealthiest pottery concern of the day. One of the firm's members was Jabez Vodrey who was called the father of potting west of the Alleghanies having come from Staffordshire in 1827. Jabez settled in East Liverpool in 1847. Note that in 1998 SBW and MVW met and discussed the pottery business with a descendant of Jabez Vodrey who is a practicing attorney in East Liverpool.


Both Blakely and Woodward were large property owners in the town and the people looked on Blakely as a wealthy man. He and his brother had come from Pittsburg some years before and had interested themselves in developing real estate.

The firm built three kilns, making the new works the most pretentions in the town. The people believed now that a new era had dawned for the industry; and had it not been for the series of "10 years" disasters that followed, beginning with the panic of the early '50's and ending with the Civil War, it is safe to say ther would have been a story of substantial progress to tell.

The winter of 1854-55 was particularly severe and since there were many crop failures the company was unable to pay workers who took some of their wages in goods from the company store.

Business revived slowly with the firm taking a contract to furnish the terra-cotta decorations for the new St. Paul's Cathedral in Pittsburgh. The contract cost the firm money and its burden hastened their decline. in 1857 Woodward, Blakely and Co, assigned. John S. Blakely, who had only a few years before been the wealthiest man in the town, lost all he had. He was at that time serving as postmaster under President Buchanan, and shortly after his term expired removed to St. Louis. The plant was offered at a sheriff sale in 1859.7 
NEWSPAPER*25 June 1840 He was mentioned in a newspaper Here is an extract from Bishop Purcell, publisher of Catholic Telegraph:
The town of East Liverpool, Columbiana County which was laid out nearly 30 years ago, but which begun to be improved only a few years past, is one of the healthiest and most agreeably situated on the Ohio River. Mr. James Blakely (of East Liverpool and a convert) with a liberality which we have pleasure in recording, and which, we trust, will find many imitators gave four hundred dollars for the church just built. He in connection with four other gentlemen viz.: Messrs. Mitchell, Mausley (Mc Caully ?) Cooke and Smith, presented three town lots for the sacred building. The first two of these gentlemen have also paid $100 each towards the erection of the church. Mr. John Blakely, a convert like his brother mentioned above, has offered one hundred dollars. Mr. Kerrins, architect of St. Paul's church, Pittsburgh, who resides here, has also given a hundred dollars for a new altar, and his wife who is a convert, has done and contributed much in company with the family of another estimable convert, Mr. Bayley, together with Mrs. Blakely, and others to decorate the sanctuary, if not to build up the very walls of our little Sion.... The pious pastor, Rev. Mr. James Conlan, lodges at the hospitable residence of Mr. Fortune. Note that a note in the scrapbook containing this clipping made by James Blakely's son LJB states, " Father was not a resident of East Liverpool as his brother was, but had very large interest there." on 25 June 1840 at East Liverpool, OH
CENSUS1850*1850 He appeared on the CENSUS in 1850 at East Liverpool, OH; I found John and Jemima Bleakley in the 1850 census in Liverpool Twp, but not in any of my other resources. John and Jemima were living next to Walter Fortune 78 m Pa.(Jemima's father)
Census enumerated July 4, 1850
John Bleakley, 39, Potter, value of real estate: $3000, born England
> Jemima, 39, born Penn.
> Emma, 15, born Penn., deaf & dumb
> Adelaide, 11, born OH
> James, 7, born OH, attends school
> Frances, 8/12ths, born Ireland
> Walter Fertune?, 78, born Penn.
> Ann, 74, born Ireland
> Ann, 45, born Penn., born Penn
> James McMay, 12, born Virginia, attends school.8 
Residence1851 He lived in 1851 at East Liverpool, OH; "History of Columbiana Co. Ohio" p. 176 (LDS library 977.163) states that John S. Blakely was a Township Trustee.
NEWALL BRIDGE IN BACKGROUND
ELECTION*1851 He was elected in 1851 at Township Trustee, Columbiana County, OH; History of Columbiana Co, Ohio p. 176. 
CENSUS1860*1860 He appeared on the census in 1860 at East Liverpool, OH; Census enumerated June 10, 1860
John Blakely, 48, Potter, value of real estate: $5500, value of personal estate: $800, born England
Jemima C., 47, born Pennsylvania
Mary J., 24, born Penn., dumb
James W., 17, born Ohio, attended school
Ida E., 14, born Ohio
Frances N., 10, born Ohio.9
 
Occupation*1860 He was He served as Postmaster of the Borough of E. Liverpool in 1860, appointed by Pres.Buchanan. in 1860 at East Liverpool, OH
ResidenceJanuary 1861 He lived in January 1861 at Grant Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA.10 
CENSUS1870*1870 He appeared on the census in 1870 at St. Louis, MO; 1870 MO, St. Louis Co., Ward 5, 73rd Subdivision Page 6
BLAKELY, John S., 56, retired merchant/$5000, ENG
Jemima, 56, keeps house, ENG
Mary, 32, ENG
Frances, 19, teacher, OH
James, 25, bookkeeper, OH
FORTUNE, Mary, 54, PA.11
 
Anecdote*1896  In 1896 at East Liverpool, OH, The following is taken from his son Walter J. Blakely's obituary:
"John S. Blakely of the old renowned manufacturing pottery firm of Woodward and Blakely whose plant occupied the cite where the Hall China company now stands and which has been recently sold to the Board of Education for the new High School building.
The elder Blakelys were English people and came to this country in the early 40’s and settled in Pittsburgh afterwards removing to this city.
Mr. Blakely’s father, John S. Blakely, was appointed postmaster of this city for a series of years under the presidency of Buchanan. Mr. Blakely gave the piece of property where the engine room of the Vodrey pottery now stands to the Catholic people of this city for the site upon which they might build their church.
The Blakelys retired from the potting business about 1861 and removed to St. Louis where they have made their home since." 
RECORDS*2003  In 2003 at Columbus, Ohio, The charming pencil sketches of Jemima and John Simpson Blakely were donated to the Ohio Historical Society for preservation. They were originally saved by Aunt Frank, spent fifty years in Beechwood 's attic and now seem to have found an appropriate home. 

Family

Jemima Cecelia Fortune b. 1809, d. 24 August 1898
MARRIAGE*22 August 1833 He married Jemima Cecelia Fortune, daughter of Walter Fortune and Ann Craft, on 22 August 1833 at Pittsburgh, PA, Witness were Luca and Francisca Fortune (likely her brother and sister); SLB's date diary gave date at Aug 25 1833.3
JOHN SIMPSON BLAKELY
Children
Last Edited6 Jul 2011

Citations

  1. John Simpson Blakely's business is discussed at length in Mc Cord's History of Columbiana Co., OH which is located at the Largo, FL library Call number 929.377163.
  2. [S38] Baptismal Entry St. Paul, Diocese of Pittsburgh
    Synod Hall
    125 N. Craig Street
    Pittsburgh, PA 15213
    412-621-6217 Fax 412-621-6237.
  3. [S17] SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.
  4. [S8] Family information.
  5. [S36] Clippings, various dates.
  6. [S511] St. Louis Cem., #150498 CALVARY.
  7. [S22] McCord, Columbiana County Ohio, 151-164.
  8. [S52] 1850 Census;.
  9. [S54] 1860 Census;.
  10. [S463] "Sebastian Wimmer Diary,."
  11. [S55] 1870 Census;.

Joseph Mariam Blakely

M, #57, b. 19 May 1847, d. 31 October 1912
FR. ALOYSIUS
Father*James B. Blakely b. 15 Jun 1804, d. 19 Jun 1882
Mother*Susananna Smyth b. 15 Sep 1804, d. 12 Nov 1885
Relationships2nd great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
2nd great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*19 May 1847 Joseph Mariam Blakely was born on 19 May 1847 at Pittsburgh, PA.1,2 
 He was the son of James B. Blakely and Susananna Smyth
Baptism23 May 1847 He was baptized on 23 May 1847 at Roman Catholic; St. Patrick/St. Paul, Pittsburgh, PA, Sponsors Johanne Mitchell and Elizabeth Jennings.2 
Death*31 October 1912 He died on 31 October 1912 at St. Mary's Monastery, Dunkirk NY, NY, at age 65 Obituary reads: The Rev. Aloysius Blaekly of the Congregation of Passionists died yesterday at St. Mary's monastery in Dunkirk, NY. Fr. Blakely was at one time rector of the Passionist Monastery at Rome Italy and also served several terms as Vicar General of Bulgaria. He was born in Pittsburgh, PA 75 years ago.3,1 
Biography*  The ninth and second youngest child of James and Susanna [Smyth] Blakely was Joseph Miriam Blakely. Joseph was born the 19th of May 1847 and baptized on the 23rd of May at St. Paul's Church in Pittsburgh. Joseph studied for the priesthood and was ordained on April 18, 1870 in Hichester, Maryland. At his ordination he took the name "Father Aloysius". I will let the article, published in the Catholic Telegraph in 1912 speak to the life of this holy man.

               DEATH OF REV. A. BLAKELY, C. P.

     The Distinguished Passionist Was Well Known in America and Europe Rev. Aloysius Blakely, one of the best known members of the Passionist Order, and former Vicar-General of Bulgaria, died at the Passionist Monastery in Dunkirk, N. Y., October 31. Father Blakely     was a member of a family distinguished for its service to Church and Country. His great grandfather, Simon Ruffner, with his two brothers Christian and George Ruffner, gave in 1787 to Father Carroll, afterward first Bishop of the United States, the first piece of           property owned by the church west of the Allegheny Mountains. The family originally settled in Brooke Co., Va.
11 The information that Joseph was "born in Brooke Co., Va." is wrong. He, as the others, was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.. where Father Blakely was born May 17, 1848. He was one of a family of thirteen children, of whom but one survives, Mr. Laurie J. Blakely, well-known journalist and for many years editor of the Commercial Tribune of this city.
     The future priest was baptized Joseph Mary and at the early age of fifteen, he entered the Passionist Order at Pittsburgh, and on his reception was given the name of Aloysius. After his profession, he was sent to the House of Studies of the order at Hichester, Md. and was ordained April 18, 1870 by Bishop Becker of Wilmington. For a time           he was Master of Novices at the motherhouse, then he was made Rector of the Sacred Heart Retreat at Louisville, later serving in the           same capacity at Hoboken. In 1895 the condition of the church in Bulgaria, because of the persecution of the Turks, needed a man able to cope with the situation, and the Passionist Superior General selected Father Aloysius for the work. He was appointed Vicar-General to the Bishop and for 10 years labored in that country, which is now attracting so much attention in its war with its hated and ancient foe. With Bishop Wigger of Newark, he later made a tour of the Holy Land and was one of a committee commissioned to bring about more humane treatment for the Christians from the Turk. His mission bore fruit. His tact was almost equal to his kindness; he won his enemies for friends. He was then appointed by his Superior to collect for the church in Bulgaria, and in this capacity he visited Mexico and the principal cities of the United States.
     But the work had been too severe, and his health gave way. Three years ago he went to the Baltimore Monastery to recuperate, and last March he entered St. Agnes Hospital, where an operation was performed on him. About six weeks ago he went to Dunkirk, somewhat improved, as it was thought, but it was only the shifting of the clouds before the sunset.
     His passing is widely mourned, for in his day he was one of the most prominent of the missionaries of his Order, and going from one end of the country to the other in performance of his duty, he made friends everywhere. His family connections were also large and, in the various branches, distinguished for their devotion to religion. Counting only from his own generation, twenty-two of his relatives have entered the service of God in the religious life. A sister became a Benedictine nun, and died Prioress of the convent in Nebraska City, Nebraska; one of his nieces is Madame Ryan, a Religious of the Sacred Heart; another niece, Sister Jane Frances Blakely, is a member of the Visitation Order at Cardome, Georgetown, Ky. and last summer his nephew, Paul L. Blakely, S. J., was ordained at St. Louis. A cousin is the well-known temperance worker, Very Rev. Dr. Lambing, of Pennsylvania.
     Father Blakely was noted for his eloquence, and his missionary work was highly successful. He served his Order and the Church well and faithfully during the fifty years of his religious life, and without doubt is now enjoying the blessedness prepared by the Lord for those who are faithful in the place assigned to them. To his brother, Mr.                Blakely, the CATHOLIC TELEGRAPH extends its sympathy in this test of the many bereavements he has so lately been called upon to bear."

 
Religion* He was Catholic. 
Name Variation  Joseph Mariam Blakely was also known as Fr. Aloysius Vicar General of Bulgaria. 
Name Variation  Joseph Mariam Blakely was also known as Rev. Aloysius. 
Employment*1867  He was at a monastery in Pittsburg, Pa and also at a monastery at Mt. Adams in Cinn, Ohio

The following is from SLB "Reminiscenses"
"Of his large family of children, Joseph was among the first American to enter the novitate. He labored for many years in this country and in the missions in Bulgaria. I remember seeing him at the monastery in Pittsburgh or maybe it was Allegheny, adjacent to a part of the city and at the monastery in Mt. Adams in Cincinnati, He became Vicar General of Bulgaria, then a principality recently liberated from the Turks. He told me many stories, one of which has stuck in my mind. Visiting a Turkish gentleman, he saw and spoke to a Turkish lady who immediately left the room. It turned out that this was the wife of one of the friends of his host, who had her head cut off because she had permitted a man to see her unveiled." 
Employment1901 He was employed by According to his sister's obituary in 1901 he was the Vicar General of Nicopolis, Bulgaria. in 1901. 
Last Edited11 May 2008

Citations

  1. [S36] Clippings, various dates.
  2. [S38] Baptismal Entry St. Paul, Diocese of Pittsburgh
    Synod Hall
    125 N. Craig Street
    Pittsburgh, PA 15213
    412-621-6217 Fax 412-621-6237.
  3. [S17] SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.

Josephine Blakely

F, #230, b. 1871, d. 15 July 1942
Father*William James Blakely b. 26 Apr 1839, d. 7 Jan 1877
Mother*Mary Gensheimer b. 1850, d. c 1930
Relationships1st cousin 3 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
1st cousin 3 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
Birth*1871 Josephine Blakely was born in 1871 at Erie, PA.1 
 She was the daughter of William James Blakely and Mary Gensheimer
Death*15 July 1942 She died on 15 July 1942. 
Name Variation  Josephine Blakely was also known as Sister Rose Aloysia. 
Biography*  Head of Latin Department at Seaton Hill College in Greensburg, Pa. 
Name Variation  Josephine Blakely was also known as She was called "Cousin Josie" by Sister Jane Francis (Aunt Sue). 
CENSUS1880*1880 She appeared on the Census in 1880 at Erie, PA.2 
Employment*18 July 1888 3 
CONVENT*2 October 1888 She was She was a nun living in Johnstown Pennsylvania during the great flood of 1889. she wrote a moving account of her experience in a letter home to her mother. A copy of the letter is in MVW file. on 2 October 1888 at Greensburg, Westmoreland County, PA
Last Edited12 Sep 2005

Citations

  1. [S56] 1880 Census;.
  2. [S56] 1880 Census;, She lived with mother and grandfather.
  3. [S32] "SLB Remembrances,."

Laurie Aloysius Ruffner Blakely

M, #49, b. 26 April 1894, d. 29 December 1971
Father*Laurie John Blakely b. 4 Mar 1843, d. 21 Jan 1917
Mother*Lily Hudson Lendrum b. 13 Sep 1852, d. 2 Apr 1922
RelationshipsGreat-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
Great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Landrum
PETER LANDRUM
SIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*26 April 1894 Laurie Aloysius Ruffner Blakely was born on 26 April 1894 at Harris (Third St.) Newport Ky., Newport, Cambell County, KY, Name shown on bible is Laurie Aloysius Ruffner Blakely. Sponsors were Victor M. O'Shaughnessy and Effie V. Ryan.1 
 He was the son of Laurie John Blakely and Lily Hudson Lendrum
Baptism10 May 1894 He was baptized on 10 May 1894 b-April 26, 1894; bp-May 10, 1894; s/o Laurie J. Blakely & Lilly H. Lendaum. 
MARRIAGE*17 November 1920 He married Frances Shouse on 17 November 1920 at Lexington, Fayette County, KY
Death*29 December 1971 He died on 29 December 1971 at Lexington, KY, at age 77. 
Employment* He was employed at Ins.Broker. 
Name Variation1894  As of 1894, Laurie Aloysius Ruffner Blakely was also known as Laurie Aloysius Ruffner Blakely This is the name shown in Bible record. 

Family

Frances Shouse b. 25 July 1899, d. 6 December 1983
MARRIAGE*17 November 1920 He married Frances Shouse on 17 November 1920 at Lexington, KY
Last Edited25 May 2007

Citations

  1. [S35] Lendrum Blakely.

Laurie John Blakely1

M, #43, b. 4 March 1843, d. 21 January 1917
LAURIE JOHN BLAKELY
LAURIE JOHN BLAKELY
Father*James B. Blakely b. 15 Jun 1804, d. 19 Jun 1882
Mother*Susananna Smyth b. 15 Sep 1804, d. 12 Nov 1885
Relationships2nd great-grandfather of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
2nd great-grandfather of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Landrum
PETER LANDRUM
SIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
ReferenceA-12
Birth*4 March 1843  Family stories say he was born in Brooke County Virginia (which is today West Virginia), but no proof suppots this claim. (His son Paul applied for a passport in 1922 and gave his father's birthplace as Washington co. virginia which later became West Virginia). In fact, in three or four census his birthplace is given as Pennsylvania. However, Brooke County was directly across the river from East Liverpool Ohio where his father and Uncle were heavily engaged in land speculation and the pottery business at about the time of LJB's birth. It is possible that James and Susan Blakely were living just across the river when Laurie was born.2,3 
 Laurie John Blakely was the son of James B. Blakely and Susananna Smyth
Baptism12 March 1843  Sponsors were John Mitchell and Catherine McCawley. Note that Nathaniel McCawley and Maria Mitchell were the sponsors of Alice Teresa who was baptized June 1, 1845.3 
MARRIAGE*28 June 1877  On 28 June 1877 The Court House records of the marriage give the following information. Lilly H. Landrum was married June 28, 1877 in Covington and was 21 when she married. (This would put her date of birth as 1856. Other records give her birthdate as 1852) It was her first marriage and she said her father was born in Virginia and her mother was born in Kentucky. Her father was present when the court house record was made.

The court house record refers to Laurie J. Blakely as Laurene J. Blakely residing in Covington. He stated that he was 30 years old, but actually he was 33. His occupation was listed as Lawyer and he says he was born in Virginia. He stated that his father was born in Virginia and his mother was born in Pennsylvania. This does not square with census data from several years that show his father born in England and if Laurie Blakely was born in Virginia, it was the part that later became West Virginia. (Perhaps he wanted to establish Virginia ancestors as no doubt he was aware that his wife was from a long line of "old Virginians". --MVW 2001

Lillie Hudson Lendrum married at the age of 25, on June 28, 1877 to Laurie John Blakely of Covington, Ky. The wedding was held at the bride's home, 619 Scott Street in Covington. The groom was a Catholic, from a very Catholic family, but since the bride was Baptist, the wedding could not be held in the church. The following is a description of the wedding:

"ORANGE BLOSSOMS"
No sweeter lady was ever wedded to a worthier or genial gentleman than when Miss Lillie Lendrum was wedded to Mr. L. J. Blakely. The marriage was celebrated in simple, pretty style at the home of the Bride's parents, #619 Scott Street, yesterday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Father Tom Major, of Cynthiana, officiating. The bride looked indisputably lovely in her pure white attire, ornamented with natural flowers; and the groom was as handsome as handsome can be. The parlors were clothed in white, decked off with flowers and pretty illuminations, and the whole presented a most charming tableau. Only a few of the nearest relatives and intimates were there. And the wedding pair took passage on the Fleetwood at 4 o'clock destined for Greenbrier, White Springs, where they will abide for a few days, and then return to their home. Among the wedding gifts were: ornamental work from her own workmanship, Miss Carrie Gedge; bracelets, Mr. Harry Lendrum; pickle jar, silver stand and spoons, Warren T. Lendrum; silver fruit spoons in case, Mrs. W. H. Mackey; a case of silver knives, Mrs. J. B. Lendrum; silver jewell casket, Mrs. Boyd; silver napkin rings, "Cousin Mollie"; pitcher and goblet, Mrs. Mary B. Ryan; silver basket, Mrs. A. J. Whipps; bouquet of elegant ---, Mrs. N. B. Stephens (Napoleon B. Stephens - all the Stephens in the Blakely family bear this name in honor of his friend. Thank goodness, it could have been Napoleon instead of Stephens!" ; another of same from "Dodo" Ryan."

It was hardly a year past the wedding date when on May 25, 1878, at the age of about 70, John B. Lendrum died.

As a newly wed couple, the first few years must have been trying because their first son, Stephens L. Blakely was born on April 23, 1878, only one month prior to his grandfathers death, and their second son, Paul Lendrum Blakely was born Feb. 27, 1880, only a month prior to his grandmother's death from what was described as a long and painful illness, and during which time she seemed to have been living with the newlyweds.

The couple was married at 619 Scott St. Covington, KY. In Stephens L. Blakely's wedding scrapbook there is a picture of "Georgia Row" at White Sulfer Springs with the note that this is where "Mr. and Mrs. B., Sr. spent their honeymoon in 1877. Looks like Jane and Stephens Woodrough selected the same spot and took the picture.
Marriage by Rev. Thomas Major (priest) in the presence of Rev. W.H Felix (Baptist Minister) and Mrs. E. Woodall and others, kinfolks and friends according to LJB's entry in bible.4,5,6,7
LAURIE BLAKELY
FAMILY
Death*21 January 1917 He died on 21 January 1917 at Covington, Kenton County, KY, at age 73.5 
Obituary26 January 1917 Obnituary of Laurie John Blakely was SPIRIT OF NOTED WRITER WINGS ITS FLIGHT ACROSS UNCHARTED SEAS
"Finis" was written to the chapter of life of Laurie J. Blakely 67 years old (wrong - he was born in 1843) yesterday morning at his home 621 Garrard Avenue, Covington. His end came suddenly. Last Saturday, while seated at his desk in The Commercial Tribune office, he complained of feeling ill. He went home, took to his bed, never to rise again.
Only a week or so ago, Mr. Blakely recounted his entrance into the "newspaper game." It was back in 1873 during the trial of the divorce case brought against Colonel William T. Terrell, at that time the Covington correspondent for The Commercial. Conducting the case against Terrell was Harvey T. Meyers, who had been cautioned to abstain from reference to Terrell's personal affairs. Terrell took umbrage at the method used by Harvey and shot him dead.
There being no one to "cover the story," Murat Halstead, then the editor-in-chief of the paper, went across the river to see to the defense of Terrell and to arrange for an account of the proceedings.
Mr. Blakely had been admitted to the bar and was in the crowd about the Courthouse. He was pointed out to Halstead as a writer of gift, and the editor offered him the assignment of recounting the stirring affair.
"It was a choice between the law and journalism" said Mr. Blakely, "and scribbling won the verdict." In the forty years that he followed the scent of the news Mr. Blakely held many honored positions. His crisp, clean and almost judicial treatment of subject matte made his writings distinctive and individual. His sense of humor made him an ideal editorial paragraphist.
For years he was a co-worker with the dean of the newspaper world, Henry Watterson of The Courier Journal, Louisville, and late was an editorial writer of The Evening Post and Time of that city. He edited The Commonwealth an afternoon paper published in Covington and directed the editorial matter of a magazine published in Cincinnati.
In politics he made himself felt in three terms of service in the City Council of Covington and served as President for one term. He also was elected to one term as City Solicitor of that city. Mr. Blakely was a Virginian by birth and served under the flag of the Confederacy for the (sic) year of the war. In 1877 he married Miss Lillian H. Lendrum., and besides the widow six children survive: Misses Elizabeth A., Susan H. and Marie Louise, commonwealth Attorney Stephen L. Blakely, Rev. Paul L. and Laurie J. Blakely, Jr.
During the past five years he had been connected with the College of Journalism of the St. Xavier College which also was under his direction as dean. He had been honored with the Degrees of Doctor of Laws and Doctor of Journalism.
The funeral service will be held from St. Mary's Cathedral Saturday morning at which his son Rev. Paul L. Blakely will sing the mass.
The Kenton County Bar Association will attend the funeral. on 26 January 1917 at Covington, KY.8 
Burial*27 January 1917 He was buried on 27 January 1917 at St. Marys Cemetery, Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY.5 
Employment* He was a by Journalist at Cincinnati, Hamilton County, OH
CENSUS1850*1850 He appeared on the CENSUS in 1850 at Ward 5, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA.2 
DIARY ENTR*30 January 1857  On 30 January 1857 at Pittsburgh, PA, Sebastian Wimmer's diary says he "went to St. Vincent with Lawrence Blakely" Also mentioned in diary as '"young Laury."9 
DIARY ENTR12 February 1857  On 12 February 1857 He attended wedding of his sister, Lavinia and Sebastian Wimmer.9 
DIARY ENTR16 July 1857  On 16 July 1857 "Venie, Sue and Lawrence were along..."(returning from Loretto and the "Boys Exhibition" there.)

In a newspaper column dated 1897 LJB states: "I myself spent two years at the college at Loretto, and many a time, with good and humble Brother Clement, our prefect of studies, I have sat and knelled - that was in youthful days - at the base of "Gallitzin's pine."9 
DIARY ENTR7 September 1857  On 7 September 1857 "Lawrence started this afternoon for St. Vincent's School."9 
CENSUS1860*1860 He appeared on the census in 1860 at 6th Ward, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA; Shown in census as J.L. age 17 occupation as clerk.10 
Residence1862 He lived in 1862 at Cincinnati, OH; Williams Directory says he is a notary public and phonographer(stenographer) at 53 West Third street and living at 221 Broadway.11 
Residence1863 He lived in 1863 at Cincinnati, OH; Williams Directory lists J. Laurie as notary at 53 West 3rd St. with home at 333 W 6th.11 
Residence1864 He lived in 1864 at Cincinnati, OH; Laurie Blakely disappears from the Williams Directory. This is consistent with stories that he joined the Confederacy. However, he turns up as a witness at his brother's wedding in St. Marys in Elk County in May of 1864 and appears in his uncle's diary in February 20th, April 24th,May 13 and 15, Aug. 21st, Sept 21, December 1 and 3 and on Dec 8 leaves for Philadelphia. The Dec. 30th Wimmer diary entry says "Met Laury Blakely at Merchant's Hotel..."9 
Note*1864  In 1864 He was elected to the office of County Attorney.
Milit-Beg*circa 1865 He began military service circa 1865 Family stories say that he joined the Confederate Army in the waning days of the war. No evidence of this has ever been found. Confederate records indicate that there are two Blakelys who enlisted in the Confederate service. Neither of these men seems to fit with Laurie Blakely son of James and Susan. Both of the other possible Blakely enlistees entered the service too early. (Might be good to check in Nebraska since his sister went there in 1863. Possibly he followed her.)
However, this seems far-fetched as he appears in both the 1860 and 1870 census of Elk Co. Pa and is still living with his parents at age 28. Also, in 1864 (at age 20) he was a witness for his brother William's marrige, and he appeared present in St. Mary's in March of 1868 when he is mentioned several times in the Sebastian Wimmer diary.

The following is from SLB "Reminiscences"
SLB was Stephens Laurie Blakely son of LJB. SLB wrote notes in later life, but they are not entirely accurate.


My father was a most reticent man, but had on occasion talked about his flight to Canada after the close of the war between the states. When Richard told me about the Canadian dimes, nickles and quarters, some of which he still had in his pocket, it seemed to me like bringing a distant past right up in the middle of that hot afternoon on Scott Street near the house where I was born, right across the street from Spangler's Mule Yard and Livery Stable
.

Note: Richard said he used to saddle LJB horse and received tips in the form of Canadian money. Note from MVW. (Why would a man give Canadian coins as tips in the year 1870 or later? Seems like a long time to have coins just jingling around in your pocket from a visit five years earlier unless perhaps you were trying to get rid of them and hoped Richard would not mind foreign money.)12,9 
DIARY ENTR27 February 1865  On 27 February 1865 Sebastian Wimmer and LJB went to Philadelphia together. Family legend has always said the LJB entered the Confederate service late in the war, wrote about the surrender then went to Canada. As of July 2001 there is no evidence of this. Instead the evidence shows him receiving $1500. proceeds from a land sale on March 3, 1865 and traveling with his uncle, Sebastian Wimmer, to Philadelphia on February 27, 1865. The only period unaccounted for is after March 3, 1865 to June 29 1866. Possibly the trip to Philadelphia was for the purpose of enlisting in Confederate service or at least traveling to a place where that was possible, but if this were the case it seems that Sebastian Wimmer would have made a remark about it. Sebastian seems to have been rather apolitical. Its possible that the Philadelphia trip was for the purpose of getting employment for Laurie. This seems more reasonable. MVW July 2001.9 
DIARY ENTR3 March 1865  On 3 March 1865 at St. Mary's, Elk County, PA, LJB received $1,500 which was half of land sale proceeds paid to Sebastian Wimmer. Family legend has always said the LJB entered the Confederate service late in the war, wrote about the surrender then went to Canada. As of July 2001 there is no evidence of this. Instead the evidence shows him receiving $1500. proceeds from a land sale on March 3, 1865 the month folowing a trip with his uncle Sebastian Wimmer to Philadelphia on February 27, 1865.9 
DIARY ENTR29 June 1866  On 29 June 1866 at St. Mary's, PA, On Thursday, June 29th, 1866:"Took a walk to Priory in company of Laury, Ernest and Wilfried about noon" This shows that Laury was in St. Mary's, Elk Co. Pa. in 1866.9 
DIARY ENTR11 June 1867  On 11 June 1867 Sebastian Wimmer notes in his diary that Laury Blakely was in St. Marys on the 11th and 12th of June.9 
NoteAugust 1867 He The Elk County Railroad and Mining Gazette Company was founded with William and Laurie Blakely as contributors. The object was to promote the resources of the county. This would seem to suggest that family stories about Laurie serving in the Civil War are fantasy. in August 1867 at Elk County, PA.
DIARY ENTR11 November 1867  On 11 November 1867 at St. Mary's, PA, Mon., Nov. 11th Stayed all day at home. Some snow towards evening and quite cold. Laury dined here. Moved new wardrobe upstairs. - Sebastian Wimmer's Diary.9 
DIARY ENTRFebruary 1868  In February 1868 at St. Mary's, PA, Wimmer diary mentions Laury on Feb 8, 9, 14 and 15th.9 
DIARY ENTRMarch 1868  In March 1868 at St. Mary's, PA, Laury Blakely is mentioned in Sebastian Wimmer's diary a number of times this month on the 15th, 21st, 23rd and 29th.9 
Note24 September 1868  On 24 September 1868 at PA The first issue of Elk County Railroad and Mining Gazette was published. Laurie Blakely was the second editor. 
DIARY ENTR1869  In 1869 at St. Mary's, PA, Jan 17 Laury Blakely sold Life insurance policy to Sebastian Wimmer.
February 14th and 21 he at supper at the Wimmer house.9 
OccupationSeptember 1869 He was He was admitted to the bar. in September 1869 at Forest County, PA
DIARY ENTR1870  In 1870 at St. Mary's, PA, During 1870 Laury was quite active with the Wimmers: Feb 27 he dined at Wimmer home, April 17 he was "entertained" at Wimmer home, April 24 he "Walked to Silver Creek" with Wimmer, May 1 he accompanied Wimmer out of town, May 2nd he tends so some "business" for Wimmer, May 22 he accompanied Wimmer family to Priory in St. Mary's, July 24 he dined with his parents and sister, Sue, at Wimmer house, August 10 he assisted Wimmer to his home from the train depot. Aug 24 he went to Erie with Venie and Sebastian Wimmer and all three returned on Aug 26. On Aug 28 he dined at Wimmer home, Sept 26 he went with Wimmers "as far as Warren", Sept 30 he joins Wimmer party at Ridgway, returnin to St. Mary's. Then accompanies the two Misses Seabrook as far as Lock Haven. Oct. 9th he dined at the Wimmer home, Dec 11 the Wimmers dined with the Blakelys and Laury was there and they celebrated Christmas afternoon at the Wimmer house. 
Occupation*1871 He was He was listed as the Publisher of Catholic Telegraph. in 1871 at Cincinnati, OH.11 
Residence1871 He lived in 1871 at Covington, KY; Laurie J. Blakely listed once again. By 1871 he was publisher of Catholic Telegraph at 176 Elm and living in Covington, KY.11 
DIARY ENTR20 January 1871  On 20 January 1871 at St. Mary's, PA, LJB is with Sebastian WimmerJan 9, 15, 16, 17 and 19. On the 20th Sebastian Wimmer notes, "Laury and mother (Susan Smyth Blakely) start tonight for Cincinnati". They were going to attend the funeral of John B. Ryan who had died suddenly. John B. was married to Laury's sistr, Mary Louise.
Note: In March of 1871 when a family dinner was held at Sebastian's home in St. Marys LJB was not there. He would certainly have attended had he been in town.9 
DIARY ENTR30 January 1871  On 30 January 1871 at St. Mary's, PA, Sebastian Wimmer notes in his diary, "...accompanied by Laury as far as Lock Haven who was en route for Cincinnati." From this it appears that Laury attended the funeral then accompanied his mother home and returned to Cincinnati. This is the last time he is mentioned in 1871.9 
DIARY ENTRAugust 1871  In August 1871 at St. Mary's, PA, Wednesday, Aug. 9th This has been a very warm day. Went with my 3 boys to afternoon performance of Handenburgh & Co.'s Circus & Managery. Afterwards met Laurie and Dodo, just arrived from Cincinnati, and returned to Circus night performance again with Venie,Sue, Laurie,Burr, Felix & 5 Whethams. Had to leave the performance owing to my not feeling very well and retired at 11 p.m. (Note that Sebastian is now calling him "Laurie").9 
Occupation1876 He was He was a lawyer with an office at First National Bank Building 517 Madison Avenue and subscribed to an advertisement in the 1877 City Atlas of Covington, KY in 1876 at Covington, KY.
LAURIE J. BLAKELY
AT WORK
Note1879  In 1879 at PA He is listed among attorneys who practiced law. I wonder if this means that he commuted between St. Marys and Cincinnati?
Laurie admitted to practice.
CENSUS1880*1 June 1880 He appeared on the Census on 1 June 1880 at Covington, Kenton County, KY; Occupation shown as lawyer and birthplace shown as Virginia. This is the first time since 1850 that Laurie Blakely gives his birthplace as Virginia. All previous census show him born in Pennsylvania. Also, in this census his mother is shown as having been born in Maryland. This is clearly wrong and leads one to think that perhaps his wife, Lillie, gave the information and simply got it wrong or perhaps this was what she was told. Lillie did in fact come from a Virginia family that traced its roots back to George Washington.13
Residence*1880 He and Stephens Laurie Blakely lived in 1880 at Covington, Kenton County, KY; According to the 1880 census. They lived at house #207 and are shown on page 26 line 34. They had two servants Phoebe Coleman and Kate Garrett. 
Residence*23 May 1885 He lived on 23 May 1885 at Covington, Kenton County, KY.5 
Residence10 June 1885 He lived on 10 June 1885 at Covington, KY.14 
BOOKPUBLIC*circa 1890  Circa 1890 at "The Old Bridge at Frankfort" Laurie Blakely was a prolific writer. The following poem is a nice example of his skill.
"THE OLD BRIDGE AT FRANKFORT"
Flow the waters slow and sluggish when the summer moon is high,
And the old oaks on the mountain push their antlers to the sky.
Where the shadows love to nestle and the moonbeams love to paint,
Stands the Old Bridge--low and narrow, gable roofed and dark and quaint.
Pier and archway, beam and rafter, bolt and butment had they tongue,
Could, each separate, tell the story men have known and poets sung.
Tales of love and vain ambition, tales of friendship, tales of woe,
To the hushed song of the willows, -bending to the water's flow.
Sweet vows plighted in the moonlight, with the shadows locked between-
In the days when life was sunshine and no shadows dare be seen.
There, too, plighted vows were broken, vows were lightly pledged in jest
And as fitful as the shadows on the murm'ring water's breast,
There the poet' s inspiration came from earth, and stream and sky,
Nature's voices softly singing from the river flowing by.
Benediction in the starlight, dreamy legends in the breeze,
Mother Nature's rarest secrets in the tossing of the trees,
Could it speak!. Yet 'tis the story that is written every day,
Of the time that aye is coming--of the time that's passed away.
Tales of love and vows of passion; tales of joy and tales of woe,
Buried in the river's bosom; hidden in its ceaseless flow.
Aye, it keeps its secrets bravely--faithful to its ancient trust,
Though the cavaliers be sleeping with their fathers, naught but dust.
Though the fair and dainty maidens long have passed and others come,
Though it hears for aye the story--still its brave old lips are dumb.
Though its very days are numbered, quaint old bridge of by-gone days,
In this hurried Age of Progress is its quaintness in the way?
It hath kept its secrets bravely, heard by flood and told by fell,
And its epitaph be written:     "It hath kissed; but ne'er would tell.

From SLB's "Reminiscenses"
(SLB is his son Stephens Laurie Blakely. Suzy is Susan H. Blakely)
As I am writing this there comes a letter from my sister Suzy, Mother Jane Frances of the Visitation Convent of Cardome in Georgetown, Kentucky, in which she says,
"I came across this "poem" the other night when I was looking for one of Poppa's lectures on the "Dream of Gerontius" which I wanted for class. Wasn't he versatile. It seems that Miss Kitty Cranch had sent him a pair of warmers for Xmas."
My dear Miss Cranch of Kitty's Creek
Your kind attention I bespeak
These nice foot warmers come to hand
And let me tell you they're just grand
I put them on my little feet
And honestly they're just too sweet
I desuffered much but ne'er had told
How did you.8 [know my feet were cold
And now I stop - you won't be sorry
Subscripti Huic Blakely, Laurie.
]
Stagg Sawyer painted the Old Bridge in 1974
DIARY ENTRJuly 1893  In July 1893 at Newport, Cambell County, KY, Laurie J. Blakely's address shown in Wimmer Diary is 25 E. 9th St., Newport, KY. Its possible that this was his office as he seemed to live at Garrard Stree. 
CENSUS1900*1 June 1900 He was included on CENSUS 1900 on 1 June 1900 at Covington, Kenton County, KY.15 
CENSUS1900*1900 He appeared on the census in 1900 at Covington, KY; MVW read this census in March of 1978. Interesting because in this Laurie gives his year of birth as 1854 (actually was 1843) and his birthplace as Pennsylvania (which was probably true) as this is place that was stated in previous census. However, in the 1880 census he gave his birthplace as Virginia. Perhaps he had "romantic" notion of Virginia since the Centennial celebration was just four years in past. Curious? Census shows: 57 male; 822 Scott St. 
ResidenceJune 1901  In June 1901 at 824 Scott St., Covington, Kenton County, KY, Diary entry says Sebastian Wimmer packed up the old Chickering piano that had been the the barn at St. Mary's and sent it to the Blakelys at this address in Covington. Cost was $15.00.9 
Residence1917  In 1917 at Covington, KY, According to LJB obituary the Blakelys lived at 621 Garrard Avenue at the time of his death. I've been told that the family once lived at the Sanford Farm which is near the Krumplemeyer Farm. i have some black and white pictures in my file that likely were taken at the farm. 
SPECULATIO*2001  The following is speculation by Laura Steneck the transcriptionist of the Wimmer Diaries:
SPECULATION: The whereabouts of Laury J. Blakely are unknown between May 10, 1864 and Feb. 27th, 1865 - a 9 month period of time and before the end of the Civil War. Since he accompanied Sebastian Wimmer to Philadelphia in Feb. of 1865, it must be presumed that he was living in St. Mary's, Pa. at the time. I doubt if he "took leave" of his duties, iF he actually was a Confederate soldier, to accompany Sebastian to Philadelphia. In Mary Cabell Richardson's tribute to Laury she says: "..........and Forney, of Philadelphia editorial fame, picked Blakely as a coming man in the field of letters." Could Laury Blakely have been in touch with Mr. Forney while in Philadelphia?
Between Feb. 27th, 1865 and June 29th, 1866, (the next known date of the whereabouts of Laury (Wimmer diary entry), there are 14 months unaccounted for. The Civil War ended in mid 1865, and Laury is said to have gone to Canada, according to family legend, following the Civil War. Since there are still 14 months unaccounted for, this is still a possibility. By the end of the Civil War, Laury was 22 years old. I wonder if there are any records of border crossings into Canada from the States during 1865? Do any of the Richmond Enquirer newspapers of 1865 still exist? Laury supposedly wrote a very poignant piece about the surrender of Lee for this newspaper. ("But so impressed was he with the pathos of that last scene of all, the surrender of Lee, that he dipped his pen in his heart and wrote a description for the Richmond Enquirer." - Mary Cabell Richardson). After "Grant took Richmond", was this newspaper still in existance? Would have been kind of brazen to publish something like this article is presumed to have been? Between June 29th, 1866 and June 11th, 1867, (the next known date) there are another 12 months unaccounted for. It is possible that he was studying the law during this 12 month period of time.
Who was his mentor when he studied law? Where did he study the law?
From Nov. 11th, 1867, I believe it can be safely presumed that Laury was again living in St. Mary's, Elk Co., Pa. at least until 1871, (as he is listed in the 1870 Elk Co. census), when he leaves for Cincinnati, O. (Wimmer diary-Jan. 30th, 1871).8      
Note2003 He Here is a timeline created by Laura Steneck from the Wimmer diary entries.

1843 -- March 4th. John Lawrence born in Pittsburgh, Allegheny Co., Pa.

-- March 12th - John Laurentum baptized at St. Paul Church, Pittsburgh, Pa.
     Sponsors: John Mitchell & Catherine McCawley.
     (Note: Nathaniel McCawley & Maria Mitchell were the sponsors of Alice      Teresa, baptized 6-1-1845)

1850 -- Living in household with parents/siblings - per 1850 census, Pittsburgh, Pa.      Ward 5. Age 7 yrs.

1857 -- Now 13 years old.
     Wimmer diary; Jan. 29th - "Went to St. Vincent in the afternoon by      accommodation train in the company of Lawrence Blakely"
     Jan. 30th - "Left there...........in company of Father Luce & Lawrence      Blakely"
     Feb. 12th - Attended wedding of his sister, Lavinia, and Sebastian Wimmer.

     Now 14 years old:
     July 16th - "Venie, Sue & Lawrence were along........" (returning from      Loretto and the "Boys Exhibition" there.)
     Sept. 7th - "Lawrence started this afternoon for St. Vincent's School."

Note: James Blakely lost everything in the financial panic of 1857. He "assigned" ca. 1858 and by 1860 census had moved from the 5th ward to the 6th, but still in Pittsburgh.
     
1860 -- Census, Pittsburgh, 6th Ward. "JL", age 17, occupation listed as clerk.
     Living in household of James & Susanna Blakely with siblings Sue & Joseph.
     (There are also 2 other "members" of this household - K. McCanley, age 25
     and T. Whiten, age 14, both female.)

1862 -- Now age 19.
     Listed in Williams City Directory of Cincinnati, O.:
     Occupation given as "notary public & phonographer" at 53 W. 3rd;     
     Living at: 221 Broadway.
Speculation: Since he is, in later life, a practicing lawyer, perhaps he was studying the law in Cincinnati at this time. (Checking the dictionary, a "phonographer" can be construed to mean a stenographer.)

1863 -- Now age 20.
     Listed in Williams City Directory of Cincinnati, O.:
     Occupation as notary, same location
     Living at: 333 W. 6th St.

     Note: the Wimmer diaries for 1862 & 1863 are missing.

1864 -- Now age 21.
     Feb. 20th - Wimmer diary-in St. Mary's Pa.
     April 24th - Wimmer diary-in St. Mary's Pa.
     May 10th. Witness to the marriage of his brother, Dr. Wm. James, to      Josephine Luhr in St. Mary's, Elk Co. Pa.
     May 13th & 15th- Wimmer diary
     Aug. 21st - Wimmer diary-in St. Mary's Pa.
     Sept. 21st - Wimmer diary-in St. Mary's Pa.
     Dec. 1st & 3rd- Wimmer diary-in St. Mary's Pa.
     Dec. 8th - Wimmer diary - leaves for Philadelphia
     Dec. 30th - Wimmer diary - "Met Laury Blakely at Merchant's Hotel...."

1865 -- Feb. 27th - Wimmer Diary - "Left St. Mary in company of Laury Blakely at      3½ p.m. for Philadelphia." This is months BEFORE the surrender of Lee      and the end of the Civil War. Laury is still age 21; turns 22 just 5 days after      this entry. On Mar. 3rd Sebastian Wimmer mentions selling the "868 acres      in Elk Co." for a $1500. profit, "of which ½ to Laury Blakely".

1866 -- June 29th - Wimmer diary "took a walk to Priory in company of Laury,      Ernest & Wilfried." Laury is now 23 years old and obviously living in St.      Mary's, Elk Co., Pa.

1867 -- Age 24.
     June 11th & 12th mentioned in Wimmer diary-in St. Mary's Pa.
     Nov. 11th again mentioned in Wimmer diary-in St. Mary's Pa.

1868 -- Age 25.
     Feb. 8th, 9th, 14th & 15th mentioned in Wimmer diary-in St. Mary's Pa.
     Mar. 15th, 21st, 23rd & 29th mentioned in Wimmer diary-in St. Mary's Pa.

1869 -- Age 26.
     Jan. 17th - Wimmer diary. Sells Life Ins. policy to Sebastian. St. Mary's Pa.
     Feb. 14th & 21st - Wimmer diary. Ate supper at Wimmer house.

1870 -- Census of Elk Co., Pa. Living with his parents and sister, Sue X. His      occupation listed as "lawyer" and age as 27.
     Feb. 27th - Wimmer Diary - Dined at Wimmer home, St. Mary's, Pa.
     Apr. 17th - Wimmer Diary - Was "entertained" at Wimmer home.
     Apr. 24th - Wimmer Diary - "Walked to Silver Creek" with Wimmer et al.
     May 1st - Accompanies Wimmer out of town.
     May 2nd - Tends to some "business" for Wimmer.
     May 22nd - accompanied Wimmer family to Priory - St. Mary's Pa.
     July 24th - Dined with parents & Sue at Wimmer house.
     Aug. 10th - Wed. - Assisted Wimmer to his home from depot.
     Aug. 24th - Wed. - Went to Erie with Venie & Sebastian.
     Aug. 26th - Fri. - Returns to St. Mary's with Venie & Sebastian from Erie.
     Aug. 28th - Dined at Wimmer home.
     Sept. 26th - Mon. - Went with Wimmers "as far as Warren".
     Sept. 30th - Fri. - Joins Wimmer party at Ridgway, returning to St. Mary's.
          Then accompanies the 2 Misses Seabrook as far as Lock Haven.
     Oct. 9th - Dines at Wimmer house.
     Dec. 11th - Wimmer diary - dinner at Blakely's; Laury there.
     Dec. 25th - Christmas afternoon at Wimmer house.

1871 -- On Jan. 6th Wimmer meets Laury at the home of his brother, Dr. Wm.      James Blakely, in Erie, Pa.
     Jan. 9th - Wimmer Diary: "Laury returned from Erie............"
     Jan. 15th - Wimmer diary: "Laury........dined with me".
     Jan. 16th - Wimmer diary: "Laury...............at my house".
     Jan. 17th - Wimmer diary: "Little party at my house." Laury present.
     Jan. 19th - Wimmer diary: "Dined at my father in laws with John Dodge,           Felix, Laury and Sue."
     Jan. 20th - Wimmer diary: "Laury & mother start tonight for Cincinnati"      (to attend the funeral of John B. Ryan, who had died suddenly. John B. was      married to Laurys' sister, Mary Louise.)
     Jan. 30th - Wimmer diary: ".....accompanied by Laury as far as Lock Haven,      who was en route for Cincinnati." John B. Ryan was buried on the 23rd, so      he must have returned to St. Mary's, perhaps to accompany his mother      home.
     Aug. 9th - Wimmer diary: "Afterwards met Laurie and Dodo, just arrived      from Cincinnati, and returned to Circus night performance again with      Venie, Sue, Laurie......." (Dodo was a pet name for one of the Ryan sisters, I      think.)

Laury is not mentioned at all in the 1876 diary of Sebastian Wimmer.


SPECULATION:

The whereabouts of Laury J. Blakely are unknown between May 10, 1864 and
Feb. 27th, 1865 - a 9 month period of time and before the end of the Civil War.

Speculation: Since he accompanied Sebastian Wimmer to Philadelphia in Feb. of 1865, it must be presumed that he was living in St. Mary's, Pa. at the time. I doubt if he "took leave" of his duties, IF he actually was a Confederate soldier, to accompany Sebastian to Philadelphia.
In Mary Cabell Richardson's tribute to Laury she says: "..........and Forney, of Philadelphia editorial fame, picked Blakely as a coming man in the field of letters."

Speculation: Could Laury Blakely have been in touch with Mr. Forney while in Philadelphia?

Between Feb. 27th, 1865 and June 29th, 1866, (the next known date of the whereabouts of Laury (Wimmer diary entry), there are 14 months unaccounted for.

Speculation: The Civil War ended in mid 1865, and Laury is presumed to have gone to Canada, according to family legend, following the Civil War. Since there are still 14 months unaccounted for, this is still a possibility. By the end of the Civil War, Laury was 22 years old.

I wonder if there are any records of border crossings into Canada from the States during 1865??

Do any of the Richmond Enquirer newspapers of 1865 still exist?
Laury supposedly wrote a very poignant piece about the surrender of Lee for THIS newspaper. ("But so impressed was he with the pathos of that last scene of all, the surrender of Lee, that he dipped his pen in his heart and wrote a description for the Richmond Enquirer." - Mary Cabell Richardson). After "Grant took Richmond", was this newspaper still in existance? Would have been kind of brazen to publish something like this article is presumed to have been!!!

Between June 29th, 1866 and June 11th, 1867, (the next known date) there are another 12 months unaccounted for.

It is possible that he was studying the law during this 12 month period of time.
Who was his mentor when he studied law? Where did he study the law?

From Nov. 11th, 1867, I believe it can be safely presumed that Laury was again living in St. Mary's, Elk Co., Pa. at least until 1871, (as he is listed in the 1870 Elk Co. census), when he leaves for Cincinnati, O. (Wimmer diary-Jan. 30th, 1871) He returned to St. Mary's on Aug. 9, 1871, accompanied by "Dodo".

In the back of the 1893 diary of Sebastian Wimmer:
               L. J. Blakely, 25 E. 9th Str., Newport, Ky.

Here is a note from Paul Lendrum's obituary (LJ Blakely's son)

His father, who was a Confederate colonel as well as a member of the Kentucky Bar and constant contributor to Louisville, Covington and Cincinnati papers, was the son of an English-born Virginian who was a convert (through its marriage) to the Catholic Faith. The name was originally Blakeleigh and came from Lancashire.
We have never found any evidence that Laurie Blakely served in any service. His father was English-born and he did land in Virginia, but not thegenteel Virginia. He was in the part that became West virginia after the Civil War. We've never found any evidence for Lancashire either. I suspect it's more like Liverpool. MVW 2009     
in 2003. 

Family

Lily Hudson Lendrum b. 13 September 1852, d. 2 April 1922
MARRIAGE*28 June 1877  On 28 June 1877 The Court House records of the marriage give the following information. Lilly H. Landrum was married June 28, 1877 in Covington and was 21 when she married. (This would put her date of birth as 1856. Other records give her birthdate as 1852) It was her first marriage and she said her father was born in Virginia and her mother was born in Kentucky. Her father was present when the court house record was made.

The court house record refers to Laurie J. Blakely as Laurene J. Blakely residing in Covington. He stated that he was 30 years old, but actually he was 33. His occupation was listed as Lawyer and he says he was born in Virginia. He stated that his father was born in Virginia and his mother was born in Pennsylvania. This does not square with census data from several years that show his father born in England and if Laurie Blakely was born in Virginia, it was the part that later became West Virginia. (Perhaps he wanted to establish Virginia ancestors as no doubt he was aware that his wife was from a long line of "old Virginians". --MVW 2001

Lillie Hudson Lendrum married at the age of 25, on June 28, 1877 to Laurie John Blakely of Covington, Ky. The wedding was held at the bride's home, 619 Scott Street in Covington. The groom was a Catholic, from a very Catholic family, but since the bride was Baptist, the wedding could not be held in the church. The following is a description of the wedding:

"ORANGE BLOSSOMS"
No sweeter lady was ever wedded to a worthier or genial gentleman than when Miss Lillie Lendrum was wedded to Mr. L. J. Blakely. The marriage was celebrated in simple, pretty style at the home of the Bride's parents, #619 Scott Street, yesterday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Father Tom Major, of Cynthiana, officiating. The bride looked indisputably lovely in her pure white attire, ornamented with natural flowers; and the groom was as handsome as handsome can be. The parlors were clothed in white, decked off with flowers and pretty illuminations, and the whole presented a most charming tableau. Only a few of the nearest relatives and intimates were there. And the wedding pair took passage on the Fleetwood at 4 o'clock destined for Greenbrier, White Springs, where they will abide for a few days, and then return to their home. Among the wedding gifts were: ornamental work from her own workmanship, Miss Carrie Gedge; bracelets, Mr. Harry Lendrum; pickle jar, silver stand and spoons, Warren T. Lendrum; silver fruit spoons in case, Mrs. W. H. Mackey; a case of silver knives, Mrs. J. B. Lendrum; silver jewell casket, Mrs. Boyd; silver napkin rings, "Cousin Mollie"; pitcher and goblet, Mrs. Mary B. Ryan; silver basket, Mrs. A. J. Whipps; bouquet of elegant ---, Mrs. N. B. Stephens (Napoleon B. Stephens - all the Stephens in the Blakely family bear this name in honor of his friend. Thank goodness, it could have been Napoleon instead of Stephens!" ; another of same from "Dodo" Ryan."

It was hardly a year past the wedding date when on May 25, 1878, at the age of about 70, John B. Lendrum died.

As a newly wed couple, the first few years must have been trying because their first son, Stephens L. Blakely was born on April 23, 1878, only one month prior to his grandfathers death, and their second son, Paul Lendrum Blakely was born Feb. 27, 1880, only a month prior to his grandmother's death from what was described as a long and painful illness, and during which time she seemed to have been living with the newlyweds.

The couple was married at 619 Scott St. Covington, KY. In Stephens L. Blakely's wedding scrapbook there is a picture of "Georgia Row" at White Sulfer Springs with the note that this is where "Mr. and Mrs. B., Sr. spent their honeymoon in 1877. Looks like Jane and Stephens Woodrough selected the same spot and took the picture.
Marriage by Rev. Thomas Major (priest) in the presence of Rev. W.H Felix (Baptist Minister) and Mrs. E. Woodall and others, kinfolks and friends according to LJB's entry in bible.4,5,6,7
LAURIE BLAKELY
FAMILY
Children
Last Edited11 Jul 2011

Citations

  1. He was obviously named for Laurence Mitchell his uncle.
  2. [S52] 1850 Census;.
  3. [S38] Baptismal Entry St. Paul, Diocese of Pittsburgh
    Synod Hall
    125 N. Craig Street
    Pittsburgh, PA 15213
    412-621-6217 Fax 412-621-6237.
  4. [S14] SLB Diary.
  5. [S17] SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.
  6. [S35] Lendrum Blakely.
  7. [S39] "Lendrum Booklet,."
  8. [S8] Family information.
  9. [S463] "Sebastian Wimmer Diary,."
  10. [S54] 1860 Census;, His father had lost everything in the panic of 1857, but they were still living in Pittsburgh.
  11. [S20] Williams, Cincinnati City Directory.
  12. [S32] "SLB Remembrances,."
  13. [S56] 1880 Census;, Enumeration date June 10, 1880 p. 26 line 34
    T9-0425 P.228B.
  14. [S56] 1880 Census;.
  15. [S59] 1900 Census;.

Lavinia Harvey Blakely1,2

F, #53, b. 5 August 1831, d. 4 May 1904
LAVINIA BLAKELY
Father*James B. Blakely b. 15 Jun 1804, d. 19 Jun 1882
Mother*Susananna Smyth b. 15 Sep 1804, d. 12 Nov 1885
Relationships2nd great-grandaunt of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
2nd great-grandaunt of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*5 August 1831 Lavinia Harvey Blakely was born on 5 August 1831 at Pittsburgh, PA, Kay Ryan's notes say born Aug 5 1836.3,4 
 She was the daughter of James B. Blakely and Susananna Smyth
Baptism14 August 1831 She was baptized on 14 August 1831 at Roman Catholic; St. Patrick/St. Paul, Pittsburgh, PA, Sponsors are Jacob Cummins and Johanna Gallagher. (In 1998 do not know who they are.) 
MARRIAGE*12 February 1857 She married Sebastian Wimmer, son of George Wimmer, on 12 February 1857 at Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA, History of Elk Co., PA states that "Sebastian Wimmer, nephew of Arch Abbot Boniface Wimmer married Miss L.H. Blakely (Lavinia H.) of Pittsburg on 2-12-1857. They had a son, Ernest J. born 9-15-1858 at St. Mary's PA.
From SLB's "Reminiscenses" A sister, Virginia, married Sebastian Wimmer, a well-known civil engineer of his day, and a nephew of Archabbot Wimmer, of St.Vincent's, Latrobe Pennsylvania. Their daughter, Beatrice, became a Benedictine Nun and died in the 70's as Mother Beatrice Superioress of a mission school for Indians near Beatrice, Nebraska. A granddaughter became a religious of the Sacred Heart, Mother Mary Louise R.S. C. J. Academy of the Sacred Heart, Lake Forest, Illinois. Another daughter whose name I do not have, was well-known as a graceful writer and a contributor to magazines here and in England.
(Note there are some errors here. Her name is Lavinia not Virginia.) (Note that another source give marriage date as Feb 10 1857.)
This note from Sebastian Wimmer Diary: Guests at my wedding yesterday - parents of the bride; Misses Sarah & Susanne Blakely; Masters Lawrence and Joe Blakely; Mr. & Mrs. Myers; Miss Maggie Myers; Misses Arabella Beltzhoover, Kate Flood, Kate Fenton, Anne and Kate Mitchell; Misses Agnes Mitchell; Mr. & Mrs. Dodge; Miss Imogene Blakely of East Liverpool; Messrs. Bob Lynch and Edward Fenton, Joe Head and Nathaniel McCalley; Mrs. Head of Latrobe (Sophia); Father Luce Wimmer, Father Valentine Felder, and Vicar General McMahon; and Rt. Rev. Father Abbot Wimmer; Mrs. Beaumont.2,5 
Death*4 May 1904 She died on 4 May 1904 at St. Mary's, Elk County, PA, at age 72 She died suddenly of Pneumonia.6
LAVINIA BLAKELY WIMMER
Biography  The third child born to James and Susanna was Lavinia Harvey Blakely. Lavinia was born on August 5, 1831 and baptized on August 14th at St. Paul's Church in Pittsburgh Pennsylvania.
She grew up in Pittsburgh and, most likely, was educated at the Benedictine Convent School in St. Marys. Following the completion of her education, she returned to her parents’ home in Pittsburgh. Sometime between 1854 and 1856 she met a dashing young Bavarian named Sebastian Wimmer. Sebastian was born in Thalmassing, Bavaria, on January 5th, 1831, the son and sixth child of George and Theresa [Hahn] Wimmer. At the age of 2, Sebastian and his parents moved to Munich, Germany, where he attended schools and completed his education with a Polytechnical degree and by completing an engineering course.
Sebastian Wimmer was the nephew of Archabbott Boniface Wimmer, who established St. Vincent's Abbey in Latrobe, Pennsylvania. Sebastian and his uncle, Boniface, arrived in America on January 2, 1851. Arriving in New York, they traveled to the Pittsburgh area where Boniface began his labors in Latrobe, and Sebastian settled in Pittsburgh.7


 
Married Name12 February 1857  As of 12 February 1857,her married name was Wimmer.2 
Residence*1859 She lived in 1859 at St. Mary's, PA
Biography*1880  Lavinia and Sebastian are shown on 1880 census as living near to James and Susan Blakely. In 1999 the discovery of the Sebastian Wimmer diaries helps to fill in what life was like for the family in St. Mary's. Sebastian worked for the railroad as did his brother-in-law Dr. James Blakely. its very possible that Sebastian was responsible for getting Dr. James Blakely his position as surgeon with the railroad and that the elder Blakelys decided it was a good time to leave Pittsburgh and start over in St. Mary's Pennsylvania. Legal retainer dated 1911 mentions Wilford J. Wimmer and Sebastian Wimmer, Jr. 

Family

Sebastian Wimmer b. 5 January 1831, d. 29 November 1921
MARRIAGE*12 February 1857 She married Sebastian Wimmer, son of George Wimmer, on 12 February 1857 at Pittsburgh, PA, History of Elk Co., PA states that "Sebastian Wimmer, nephew of Arch Abbot Boniface Wimmer married Miss L.H. Blakely (Lavinia H.) of Pittsburg on 2-12-1857. They had a son, Ernest J. born 9-15-1858 at St. Mary's PA.
From SLB's "Reminiscenses" A sister, Virginia, married Sebastian Wimmer, a well-known civil engineer of his day, and a nephew of Archabbot Wimmer, of St.Vincent's, Latrobe Pennsylvania. Their daughter, Beatrice, became a Benedictine Nun and died in the 70's as Mother Beatrice Superioress of a mission school for Indians near Beatrice, Nebraska. A granddaughter became a religious of the Sacred Heart, Mother Mary Louise R.S. C. J. Academy of the Sacred Heart, Lake Forest, Illinois. Another daughter whose name I do not have, was well-known as a graceful writer and a contributor to magazines here and in England.
(Note there are some errors here. Her name is Lavinia not Virginia.) (Note that another source give marriage date as Feb 10 1857.)
This note from Sebastian Wimmer Diary: Guests at my wedding yesterday - parents of the bride; Misses Sarah & Susanne Blakely; Masters Lawrence and Joe Blakely; Mr. & Mrs. Myers; Miss Maggie Myers; Misses Arabella Beltzhoover, Kate Flood, Kate Fenton, Anne and Kate Mitchell; Misses Agnes Mitchell; Mr. & Mrs. Dodge; Miss Imogene Blakely of East Liverpool; Messrs. Bob Lynch and Edward Fenton, Joe Head and Nathaniel McCalley; Mrs. Head of Latrobe (Sophia); Father Luce Wimmer, Father Valentine Felder, and Vicar General McMahon; and Rt. Rev. Father Abbot Wimmer; Mrs. Beaumont.2,5 
Children
Last Edited4 May 2007

Citations

  1. Middle name Harvey from Kay Ryan's notes.
  2. [S15] Unknown editor, History of McKean, Elk.
  3. [S52] 1850 Census;.
  4. [S38] Baptismal Entry St. Paul, Diocese of Pittsburgh
    Synod Hall
    125 N. Craig Street
    Pittsburgh, PA 15213
    412-621-6217 Fax 412-621-6237.
  5. [S463] "Sebastian Wimmer Diary,."
  6. [S457] Charles J. Schaut, Early St. Marys.
  7. [S563] Laura Steneck, "Laura Steneck," e-mail to Margot Woodrough.

Mary Imogene Blakely1

F, #705, b. 1834, d. 13 January 1920
Father*John Simpson Blakely b. c 1812, d. 12 Feb 1877
Mother*Jemima Cecelia Fortune b. 1809, d. 24 Aug 1898
Relationships1st cousin 4 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
1st cousin 4 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsBLAKELY
Birth*1834 Mary Imogene Blakely was born in 1834 at PA.1,2 
 She was the daughter of John Simpson Blakely and Jemima Cecelia Fortune
Death*13 January 1920 She died on 13 January 1920 at Benton Harbor, MI, Her obituary reads: Miss M. I Blakely Dies at age of 86
The death of Miss Mary Imogene Blakely occurred at her residence, 346 Broadway on Monday evening after two years of invalidism. She is survived by her sister, Miss Frances M. Blakely, and was eighty -six years of age.

The Misses Blakely came to Benton Harbor about five years ago and have spent their summers at Pottawatomie Park and their winters in the city at their home on Broadway. The body was taken to the Slaughter undertaking establishment.

Funeral services will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock at St. John's Catholic church, Rev. Fr. J.M. Zindler of St. Joseph's church officiating. The remains will be taken to St. Louis for interment, being taken on the Michigan Central Wednesday afternoon at 4 o'clock

A second obituary reads:
DEAF DUMB AND BLIND
Brief but impressive services were held for the late Miss Mary I. Blakely at St. John’s Catholic church on Wednesday afternoon, Rev. Fr. J.M. Zindler of St. Joseph officiating. Casket bearers were Messrs. Wm. Hayden, Roy Wallace, Edward Barry and Frank Hild. The remains were placed on the Michigan Central 4 o’clock train and accompanied by the sole surviving relative, the sister, Miss Frances M. Blakely were taken to the old home in St. Louis, MO for burial. Requiem high mass services will be held at St. Louis.

Miss Blakely was a remarkably accomplished woman despite the handicap of being deaf, dumb and blind. Her blindness occurred about five years ago, but she was wonderfully active and talented. Her library at the Blakely summer home at Pottawatomie Park is said to be one of the finest in the United States. Her
sister surviving her was a teacher for twenty-five years in the St. Louis schools. They had only lived in this city, but a few years, but the friends they had drawn to them greatly admired them both for many delightful characteristics. Deceased had reached the advanced age of 86.


Burial*13 January 1920 She was buried on 13 January 1920 at Calvery Cemetery, St. Louis, MO, Funeral services were held at St. John's Catholic Church with Rev. J.M. Zindler of St. Joseph's Church officiating. Remains taken to St. Louis for burial.1 
Biography*  "Miss Blakely was a remarkably accomplished woman, despite the handicap of being deaf, dumb and blind. Her blindness occured about five years ago, but she was wonderfully active and talented. Her library at the Blakely summer home at Pottawatomie Park is said to be one of the finest in the United States. Her sister surviving her was a teacher for twenty-five years in the St. Louis schools. They had only lived in this city a few years, but the friends they had drawn to them greatly admired them both for many delightful characteristics." One source attributes her disability to scarlet fever. 
CENSUS1850*1850  She is listed as "Emma" in the census. 
CENSUS1880*1880 She appeared on the Census in 1880 at St. Louis, MO; She lived with her sister, Francis as well as her mother and brother.3 
CENSUS1900*1900  In 1900 She is living with her sister and brother and brother's family.4 
Last Edited11 Apr 2008

Citations

  1. [S36] Clippings, various dates.
  2. [S52] 1850 Census;.
  3. [S56] 1880 Census;, T9-0723 p. 39D.
  4. [S59] 1900 Census;.

Mary Louise Blakely

F, #54, b. 12 December 1832, d. 21 February 1908
MARY LOUISE RYAN
Father*James B. Blakely b. 15 Jun 1804, d. 19 Jun 1882
Mother*Susananna Smyth b. 15 Sep 1804, d. 12 Nov 1885
Relationships2nd great-grandaunt of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
2nd great-grandaunt of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*12 December 1832 Mary Louise Blakely was born on 12 December 1832 at Pittsburgh, PA.1 
 She was the daughter of James B. Blakely and Susananna Smyth
Baptism1 January 1833 She was baptized on 1 January 1833.1 
MARRIAGE*11 September 1855 She married John Becan Ryan, son of Cornelius Ryan, on 11 September 1855 at Pittsburgh, PA, Husband's name and marriage date courtesy of a Ryan relative. Her wedding was at St. Paul's Cathedral in Pittsburgh.2 
Death*21 February 1908 She died on 21 February 1908 at Cincinnati, Hamilton County, OH, at age 75 On February 23, 1908 Mary Louise [Blakely] Ryan died. A tribute published in the local paper read:The death of Mrs. Mary Louise Ryan last Sunday was a severe shock to her many friends, as it was not known generally that she was sick. She had been suffering from grip, but it was not considered dangerous until within a short time of her demise. Mrs. Ryan, whose maiden name was Blakely, was a native of Pennsylvania. Highly gifted by nature and educated in the best eastern schools, she was a contributor to various periodicals, her work being distinguished by beauty of thought and gracefulness of expression. A sister was the late Sue Blakely, whose name was well known to the readers of Catholic publications, while Mr. Laurie J. Blakely, editor of the Commercial Tribune and the Very Rev. Aloysius Blakely, C. P. former superior of the missions in Bulgaria and at present connected with the Eastern Passionist Province. are brothers; one of her daughters, Madame Ryan, is a religious of the Sacred Heart. The funeral took place on Wednesday morning from St. Xavier Church at 10 o'clock. The solemn high mass of requiem was celebrated by Rev. James A. Dowling, S.J., assisted by Rev. Thomas W. Smith as deacon, and Rev. F. X. O'Neils, S. J. as sub-deacon. The services were largely attended, many coming from a distance to pay the tribute of respect to one who, at all times proved herself a true friend, as she was ever a model Christian woman. May her soul rest in peace.2 
Biography1855  In 1855 Mary Louise Blakely, the fourth child of James and Susanna, was born on December 12, 1832 and baptized on January 13, 1833 at St. Paul's Church in Pittsburgh. Her Aunt and Uncle, Laurence and Maria Mitchel were her sponsors. A quote from a tribute paid her after her death says she was educated at the best eastern schools, which probably means the Visitation Convent School, either in Wheeling, West Virginia or in Washington, D. C. Mary Louise witnessed the conveyance of land given by her father, James Blakely, to the City of East Liverpool in Columbiana County Ohio. According to the deed, this land was to be used for a cemetery and "no one should be turned away." Today, most of this area is a rocky hillside eroded by highway construction; the installation of the Newall Bridge in 1903; and a modern hospital parking lot. The small portion that remains is a park, referred to by the locals as "Skeleton Park."
At the age of 22, having lost her heart to a dashing young man, she became the bride of John Becan Ryan, who was nine years her senior. The marriage took place on September 11, 1855 at St. Paul’s Cathedral in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Bishop Michael O’Connor performed the ceremony. Mary Louise and her new husband left Pittsburgh immediately after their marriage and set up housekeeping in Cincinnati, Ohio. Highly gifted by nature and educated in the best eastern schools, she was a contributor to various periodicals, her work being distinguished by beauty of thought and gracefulness of expression. In addition to raising her young children, Mary Louise was a writer, and she was, for a number of years, prominent in religious and literary circles in Cincinnati. Her patriotic and other poems published during and following, the Civil War (many of them anonymously) were widely copied and praised. In later years her writings in both prose and verse were of a religious character, and she was a frequent contributor to Catholic magazines and journals.3 
Married Name11 September 1855  As of 11 September 1855,her married name was Ryan. 
CENSUS1880*1880 She appeared on the Census in 1880 at Cincinnati, OH; In the 1880 census She is shown working in Public Library. She is a widow with four children at home. Things were not easy for Mary Louise, after the death of her husband. The servants were gone and she was required to seek outside employment in order to support her family. Mary Louise Ryan successfully raised her six children while serving for many years as librarian at the Cincinnati Public Library. Her granddaughter, Aileen Ryan, described her home:(Her home) in the later part of the century, was a very pretty house with a sandstone front, curved stairway and marble pilaster, and located on the upper side of Garfield Place, across from the present Doctors Building.4,3 
Biography*1911  In 1911 A document dated 1911 names a family "Effie V. Ryan, John B. Ryan, Mary Louise Ryan and James C. Ryan" and Minnie Ryan. Likely one of males is husband and other son. Don't know which. Document was legal retainer in connection with East Liverpool land dispute. Note Minnie mentioned in 1885 (Oct.) Wimmer diary. 

Family

John Becan Ryan b. 1826, d. 19 January 1871
MARRIAGE*11 September 1855 She married John Becan Ryan, son of Cornelius Ryan, on 11 September 1855 at Pittsburgh, PA, Husband's name and marriage date courtesy of a Ryan relative. Her wedding was at St. Paul's Cathedral in Pittsburgh.2 
Children
Last Edited28 Apr 2006

Citations

  1. [S38] Baptismal Entry St. Paul, Diocese of Pittsburgh
    Synod Hall
    125 N. Craig Street
    Pittsburgh, PA 15213
    412-621-6217 Fax 412-621-6237.
  2. [S17] SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.
  3. [S563] Laura Steneck, "Laura Steneck," e-mail to Margot Woodrough.
  4. [S56] 1880 Census;, T9-1025 p. 9A.
  5. [S496] Kay Ryan, "Kay Ryan to LWG," e-mail to Laura Woodrough Glass, 2000.

Mary Louise Rudd Blakely

F, #48, b. 18 August 1886, d. 16 November 1966
Father*Laurie John Blakely b. 4 Mar 1843, d. 21 Jan 1917
Mother*Lily Hudson Lendrum b. 13 Sep 1852, d. 2 Apr 1922
RelationshipsGreat-grandaunt of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
Great-grandaunt of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Landrum
PETER LANDRUM
SIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*18 August 1886 Mary Louise Rudd Blakely was born on 18 August 1886 at 1509 Madison Ave, Covington, Kenton County, KY.1 
 She was the daughter of Laurie John Blakely and Lily Hudson Lendrum
Baptism5 September 1886 She was baptized on 5 September 1886 at Roman Catholic; Cathedral, Covington, Kenton County, KY.1 
MARRIAGE*1 May 1918  On 1 May 1918 The wedding was described as follows: "The wedding of Miss Mary Louise Blakely and Mr. Lewis Carroll Baldwin was quietly and impressively celebrated Wednesday morning at St. Mary's Cathedral by Rev. Father Paul Blakely, the bride's brother, from New York City. The bride was exquisitely gowned in a tan traveling suit and picture hat. She wore a corsage of white sweet peas. The bride's only attendant was Miss Dixie Baldwin, the bridegroom's sister. She wore a tan eton dress. Mr. Laurie Blakely, brother of the bride, acted as best man. Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin left immediately for Chicago where they will reside." 
Death*16 November 1966 She died on 16 November 1966 at Albuquerque, NM, at age 80.1 
Biography*  The fifth child to bless the household of Laurie John and Lilly [Lendrum] Blakely was another daughter, Mary Louise Rudd Blakely. Born on August 18, 1886 and named for her Aunt, Mary Louise Ryan. The inscription in the family bible, made by her father, reads in part:
".... was born in Covington, Ky. at No. 1509 Madison Avenue, on Wednesday August 18th, 1886 at six o'clock and twenty-five minutes, a.m. Baptized by Very Rev'd. L. M. Lambert at the Cathedral, Covington, September 5th, 1886. Sponsors, William M. Piatt and Mary Louise Ryan.”
Mary Louise attended the same schools as her sisters, and joined in the lively discussions around the family dinner table. But unlike her two older sisters, she did not join the convent, but chose to remain at home with her parents.
On May 1, 1918, a year after the death of her father, Mary Louise became the bride of Louis Carroll Baldwin in a quiet ceremony at St. Mary's Cathedral in Covington. Her brother, Rev. Paul Blakely, traveled from New York to perform the ceremony. Her only attendant was a sister of the groom, Miss Dixie Baldwin. The bride’s brother, Laurie, acted as best man.
Louis Baldwin was 34 years old at the time of their wedding, and had been working for Standard Oil for a number of years, where he began as an office boy.
Lewis and his bride went to Chicago to take up residence.     
On February 14, 1919, Louis and Mary Louise became the parents of a son, whom they named Louis Carroll Baldwin, Jr. As an adult Lou, Jr. would become a published author of many religious and political articles.
Five years later, Louis and Mary Louise added another son to their family. Born on March 1, 1924, they named their second son John Lendrum Baldwin.
Louis Baldwin continued to work for the Standard Oil Company, and when he retired after 50 years with the company, he was the Chief Purchasing Agent. He died in September 1962, at the age of 78.
Mary Louise [Blakely] Baldwin survived her husband four years, and died on November 16, 1966.
Regretfully, this is a short biography for a delightful lady, but there is little information in the files. Laura Steneck wrote: I met "Aunt Weese" several times, when I was very young, and I remember the delightful visits and laughter when she would come to see her sister, Susan (Sister Jane Frances) at Cardome, when I was a student there. LWS).. 
CENSUS1900*1900 She appeared on the census in 1900 at Covington, Kenton County, KY; MVW read this census in March of 1978. Interesting because in this Laurie gives his year of birth as 1854 (actually was 1843) and his birthplace as Pennsylvania (which was probably true) as this is place that was stated in previous census. However, in the 1880 census he gave his birthplace as Virginia. Perhaps he had "romantic" notion of Virginia since the Centennial celebration was just four years in past. Curious? Census shows: 57 male; 822 Scott St. 
Residence*1918 She lived in 1918 at 342 Marquette Road West, Chicago, IL
Married Name1 May 1918  As of 1 May 1918,her married name was Baldwin. 

Family

Lewis Carroll Baldwin Sr b. 27 December 1880, d. September 1962
MARRIAGE*1 May 1918  On 1 May 1918 The wedding was described as follows: "The wedding of Miss Mary Louise Blakely and Mr. Lewis Carroll Baldwin was quietly and impressively celebrated Wednesday morning at St. Mary's Cathedral by Rev. Father Paul Blakely, the bride's brother, from New York City. The bride was exquisitely gowned in a tan traveling suit and picture hat. She wore a corsage of white sweet peas. The bride's only attendant was Miss Dixie Baldwin, the bridegroom's sister. She wore a tan eton dress. Mr. Laurie Blakely, brother of the bride, acted as best man. Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin left immediately for Chicago where they will reside." 
Children
Last Edited20 May 2007

Citations

  1. [S35] Lendrum Blakely.

Paul Lendrum Blakely

M, #41, b. 1 August 1918, d. 1 August 1918
Father*Stephens Laurie Blakely b. 23 Apr 1878, d. 24 Feb 1959
Mother*Jane DeValcourt Stamps Piatt b. 12 Mar 1882, d. 6 Oct 1928
RelationshipsGranduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
Granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Landrum
De Calmes
PETER LANDRUM
SIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Burial*1918 Paul Lendrum Blakely was buried in 1918 at St. Marys Cemetery, Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY.1 
Death*1 August 1918 He died on 1 August 1918 at Beechwood, Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY.2 
Birth*1 August 1918 He was born on 1 August 1918 at Beechwood, Covington, Kenton County, KY, SLB Dated diary gives August 1, 1918 as date of baptisim and burial.2 
 He was the son of Stephens Laurie Blakely and Jane DeValcourt Stamps Piatt
Last Edited4 Nov 2004

Citations

  1. [S8] Family information.
  2. [S35] Lendrum Blakely.

Paul Lendrum Blakely

M, #45, b. 29 February 1880, d. 26 February 1943
PAUL LENDRUM BLAKELY
Father*Laurie John Blakely b. 4 Mar 1843, d. 21 Jan 1917
Mother*Lily Hudson Lendrum b. 13 Sep 1852, d. 2 Apr 1922
RelationshipsGreat-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
Great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Landrum
PETER LANDRUM
SIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Burial* Paul Lendrum Blakely was buried at Poughkeepsie, N.Y, Jesuit Novitiate of Saint Andrew on Hudson, Poughkeepsie, NY.1 
Birth*29 February 1880 He was born on 29 February 1880 at Greenup St., Covington, Kenton County, KY.2 
 He was the son of Laurie John Blakely and Lily Hudson Lendrum
BaptismApril 1880 He was baptized in April 1880 at Covington, Kenton County, KY, Sponsors H. Hallan and Sallie Cambron Hallam. 
Death*26 February 1943 
Taken from America magazine dated Aug 13, 1943.

"Father Blakely's middle name, which he rarely used (Lendrum) came from his mother, Lily Lendrum. His father, who was a Confederate Colonel as well as a member of the Kentucky Bar and constant contributor to Louisville, Covington and Cincinnati papers, was the son of an English-born Virginian originally Blakeleigh and came from Lancashire."

Note from MVW 9-98. I doubt the Colonel part, and have not yet found evidence of the Confederate part or the Blakeleigh part.

 
Biography* 

(Notes from Laura Glass)     Paul was a Jesuit Priest, Florissant, Missouri.
(notes from the Blakely Bible as transcribed from Laura Glass-Paul was a Priest of the Society of Jesus)


(Newspaper article March 13, 1943)     Father Paul L. Blakely, S. J. - Veteran Catholic Jounalist by John LaFarge          PAUL LENDRUM BLAKELY, S.J., PRIEST, PATRIOT AND SCHOLAR
     On what would have been his birthday in a leap year, the last day of February, the Rev. Paul L. Blakely, S.J., was buried at the Jesuit Novitiate of Saint-Andrew-on-Hudson, Poughkeepsie, NY. If he had lived until February 29, 1944, he would have celebrated his sixteenth birthday and his sixty-fourth year. Or rather, others would have celebrated it for him, since Father Blakely had a constitutional inability to direct attention to himself. He considered himself fortunate that even the semblance of a birthday was something that came about only once in every four years.
     Having lived and worked with Father Blakely on the Staff of AMERICA for more that sixteen years of his twenty-nine in this occupation, I can say that that which impressed me when I first made his acquaintance is the same that causes me a little marveling now that he is gone. How was it that the valiant man and the genial, tenderhearted priest who was second to none in his influence upon the thought and -in many ways-upon the actual destiny of the Catholic church in America, was so comparatively little known except in name to the outer world?
     Over 1,100 signed articles appeared in AMERICA over Father Blakely's name. His unsigned editorials passed the 2,000 mark several years ago and were between 2,500 and 3,000 when, on Thursday morning, February 25, he sent down to the printer the proofs on the last material (in the March 6 issue) that his indefatigable Underwood had typed off-always with the same ease, clarity, precision of thought, length, style, language. But with all this incredible wealth of authorship, Paul Blakely never had the mind to collect even the humblest dividends of an author's fame, nor to excite any curiosity about himself. That some souls were puzzled by his using the very transparent disguise of "John Wiltbye" was a source to him of mild amusement. He was particularly delighted by the kind old lady who wrote in, after one of the many John Wiltbye articles, solicitously expressing the idea that quite possibly John Wiltbye was not such a worldly reprobate and might have a priestly vocation.
     Perhaps the key to this paradox lay in the very fiction of "John Wiltbye" itself. The name, by the way, was a genuine family name in Pual Blakely's ancestry. "Cricket Wainscott," a second pseudonym, used when Wiltbye and Blakely both occupied the field, once adorned an elderly colored man in Father Blakely's native Kentucky. When Blakely wrote for the sake of writing (more or less), combining business with relaxation, he wrote in the style and under the name of John Wiltbye. But when Blakely wrote under his own name or without signature, he wrote invariably because in his mind there was something which desperately needed saying. His craft was finished; it was an exceedingly polished, skilled, flexible technique, the very acme of logical exposition, adroit polemic, editorial rapier-thrusts. But it was a mere instrument with which to convey to the reader what he felt the reader should know, and the quicker and more clearly the reader knew it the better.
     It was Father Blakely's absorption in the causes which he argued that made him indifferent to his own reputation. But that same absorption weighted with intense feeling the winged arrows of his countless written words, and sent them piercing through to spheres of influence that some church historian, one of these days, will enjoy analyzing.
     The focus and source of these interests, for the greater part, was his profound, exact and painstaking study of the American Constitution, in the light of the nation's history, and of the other basic documents that are related to it. This study was reinforced by an extensive and valuable library of books on the Consitituion, Lincoln and American history which he collected through the years.
     Father Blakely's thought upon the importance of this subject might be summed up in three simple propositions, as I have obtained from him in many conversations.     
     First, the Founding Fathers, and the political inheritance they bequeathed to us, were guided by an uncommon degree of practical wisdom, one notable part of which was their respect for religion, the law of God and for religious education. The Constitution, as they left it to us, is a powerful safeguard for morality, freedom and social peace.
     Secondly, it is quite possible that the exigencies of government in the present-day world will require alterations in the Constitution. Father Blakely never undertook to deify either the plan or the origins of the United States. But if or when such changes should be made, they should themselves be made constitutionally, not by violence, subterfuge or usurpation of power. And the Supreme Court of the United States was called to be our chief protection against such a calamity.
     It was therefore-in the third place-our duty as citizens and upon our conscience as Catholics to be on our guard against such tendencies, most of which, from Father Blakely's point of view, manifested themselves through the attempt to place upon the central government the functions which should rightfully be performed by the individual States. The defense, intellectual and editorial, that he constructed against such tendencies, was maintained consistently through all the adminstrations he lived under while on the Staff of AMERICA; through Wilson, Harding, Coolidge, Hoover and the present Adminstration as well. The Blakely position was a non-partisan position, based upon an interpretation of the Constitution. Whether his critics agree with him or not, they should at least recognize its unchanging consistency.
     Father Blakely was literally a born journalist, for his father, Laurie John Blakely, "every inch a Catholic," was appointed Dean, in 1912, of the newly founded School of Journalism of St. Xavier College, Cincinnati died January 25, 1917, in Coving, KY., where Paul was born. The words applied to Blakely, Senior, by the Rector of St. Xavier at that time, the Rev. F. Heiermann, S. J., apply in telling fashion to Blakely, Junior; only lifted to a higher and still more consecrated plane (AMERICA, June 2, 1917):          He looked on journalishm as a great and noble profession, burdened with high responsibilities, but a power in the realm of truth, making for clear thinking and clean living. In this high ideal, he himself set the example. No one who had come in contact with him, could ever forget him. His character had something of the courteous, gentle but independent and uncompromising chivalry of old. He was a knight without fear and without reproach. His success may not always have appeared before the world, but his life was a blessing and inspiration to all who knew him.
     Father Blakely's middle name, which he rarely used (Lendrum), came from his mother, Lily Hudson Lendrum Blakely. His father, who was a Confederate colonel as well as a member of the Kentucky Bar and constant contributor to Louisville, Covington and Cincinnati papers, was the son of an English-born Virginian who was a convert (through its marriage) to the Catholic Faith. The name was originally Blakeleigh and came from Lancashire.
     Paul himself attended St. Xavier College in Cincinnati and on July 30, 1897, entered the Society of Jesus at St. Stanislaus Novitiate, Florissant, Mo. He completed his studies at St. Louis University and was ordained to the priesthood in 1912. He taught Latin, Greek and English at Detroit College, 1900-02, and was professor of Literature at St. Louis University, 1906-09. In July, 1914 he became an Associate Editor of AMERICA.
     Most men who have very intense convictions operate within a rather limited range. Father Blakely's dominant interests, however, covered so wide a field that their mere recital would fill a good part of a volume. Moreover, like his own father, and as a "born journalist," he was averse to systematization, and wrote - save for his purely religious productions-with an eye upon the issue or controversy of the moment. If I were to single out a few matters about which his convictions and expression polarized, as it were, I should nominate as favorites the individual's liberty, under the American Constitution, to fulfil his duties to God and country; the liberty of the Church, here and everywhere in the world; the integrity and the freedom of Catholic education, in all its degrees and phases; the separation of religion and politics; the danger of political or governmental centralization; the impossibllity of legislating people into virtue; the sanctity of the family as the unit of society, and of the marriage bond as its protection.
     Some day, when the history of the Church in this country is finally written, I believe that Paul Blakely will be adequately recognized as the man who saved Catholic education, at a critical moment, from one of the most insidious threats to its existence: absorption through a Federal Department of Education. Father Blakely's long, lone compaign of opposition to the establishment of such a Department was no quixotic crusade. It succeeded in clarifying not only Catholic, but a large and influential sector of non-Catholic opinion on an issue which touched upon the nature of our government, the basic interests of religion, the history of education in the United States.
     He will likewise be remembered for the part he played in the memorable investigaton of Catholic charitable institutions under John Purroy Mitchel, Mayor of New York. By his vigorous stand in this affair and the influence he wielded he succeeded, as asserted by many of his contemporaries, in saving from destruction the private charities of the Catholic church in New York City-and by inference, in many another city of the nation. The cause of private charity, incidentally, was one particularly dear to the heart of Father Blakely, and especially of personal, as opposed to merely institutionalized charity. This was expressed in his keen solicitude for the Society of Saint Vincent de Paul. He was eminently a lover of God's poor, of every race, color and creed.
     The rights of the workingman to organize and the duty of the employer to secure for him a living wage, were defended by Father Blakely, interpreting for Americans the teachings of Pope Leo's Rerum Novarum, at a time when these teachings were denounced as "Socialistic" by pious Catholic laymen and as yet seldom, if ever, referred to in the pulpits.
     Consideration for the rights of the Negro, not as a Negro but as an ordinary human being, to equal protection before the law, led Father Blakely to go directly counter to his professed distrust of Federal measures and openly advocate the enactment of the Federal anti-lynching bill.
     Perhaps the most controversial of all issues in which Father Blakely engages was the famous Mooney case. His position of sharp and unqualified condemnation of the procedure followed by the court in that instance certainly grieved, one may say scandalized, many a soul who was ready to follow him in other lines. But he was as ardent an advocate of justice for the criminal as he was of warfare against crime.
     Yet his controversies, striking as they were, played but a minor part in the total of Father Blakely's careful teaching on a positive and rounded ideal, totally alien to Puritanism and narrowminded sadness: an ideal of religion and of a full and many sided human living. The ardor of his defense grew from a deep valuing of the truly good things of life: in art, education, culture, friendly companionship, all of which he saw in a true Ignatian spirit, as gifts of the Creator leading men back to Him. The last of all his signed articles (March 6, 1943) is almost a mirror of Blakely's true and genial self.
     A man of strong convictons and wide sympathies forms friends among the dead as among the living. Charles Dickens, George Washington, Robert E. Lee, and particularly Abraham Lincoln were among Blakely's greatest intimates, and with the latter there were singular bonds of regional association, temperament, cast of mind. But in the world of God's chosen ones, none was dearer to him than Bernadette of Lourdes.
     As for his friends among the living, none were more remarkable than the unnumbered and unnamed host of men and women to whom, not as a scholar or a writer, but as an ifinitely self-sacrificing priest and ever-patient counselor he brought enlightenment, courage, spiritual direction and consolation through the hidden side of his life, a busy priestly ministry for which he found time out of his hours of much-needed sleep and leisure. In his early years, he lectured widely on history and sociology, and visited in the slum areas and night courts for first-hand information.
     For more than twenty-six years, almost to the day of his death, Father Blakely, year in and year out, devoted a Sunday a month, with Mass and instructions, to a Retreat group at the Cenacle Convent on Riverside Drive. For a dozen years or more he celebrated two Masses on all the remaining Sundays and preached to the poor at St. John's Church on East Seventy-second Street. With equal constancy he labored for the best part of a lifetime for the spiritual benefit of those admirable Religious women, the Helpers of the Holy Souls. Where he could not work personally, he followed with burning interest and passionate regret that personal service was not possible, the home missions, whose neglect, especially in the rural regions, he bitterly deplored. Visiting the sick, instructing the ignorant, counseling the doubtful, relieving those in want and suffering, were all in the day's work for Paul L. Blakely. Just a glow from that inner light penetrated to AMERICA'S readers through his weekly homily on the Gospel of the day. Just a glow: the full radiance of that hidden and supernatural life might be, dear reader, too much for your and my eye to endure in our present condition. Some day, too that revelation will be made, not by historians, but by the Judge of the living and the dead.
     In the meanwhile, as we pray for the soul of Paul L. Blakely who, with all his learning and worldly wisdom, was as obedient and simple a Religious as any novice, we may pray that we who are left may be given the grace to carry on, however, imperfectly, the great work that he brought to high stature in the years God granted him.


(piece taken from Newspaper article in America April 21, 1979)
     . . . But why blur the key significance of men who worked under several successive editors-in-chief? Future historians of AMERICA should dwell on the roles played by Paul Blakely, Robert Graham, Benjamin Masse, Harold Gardiner and Vincent Kearney, not forgetting many others with shorter terms of service. . . .
     . . .The board room walls have several photos of the gentle but redoubtable Paul Blakely, a white haired Kentuckian who spent 29 years as an associate editor. Blakely was a prodigious writer throughout years that span the middle period of the magazine. He alone, we are told, wrote practically every editorial during the 1920's and 1930's. With night turned into day, he worked the oddest hours conceivable. Often, at one in the morning, he would be pounding the beat with a police officer on upper Broadway, or he would be downtown at sessions of the night court. His interests and reading were universal, and he kept the editor's box filled with his signed articles, his editorials and features written under two assumed names. . . .
     

(From notes of Aunt Aileen Ryan)
     Paul L. Blakely, S.J., another son of Laurie and Lillie Lendrum Blakely, was on the staff of the Jesuit magazine AMERICA. During the 1920's and 1930's he wrote most of the editorials for that publication. He authored over 2,500 articles on social justice. He was buried February 29, 1944, his sixteenth birthday, age 64 at the Jesuit Novitiate of Saint Andrew on Hudson, Poughkeepsie, NY. He was one of the "Greats" in the jesuit order. (See Article AMERICA of March 13, 1943 by his friend, John LaFarge, S.J. another Jesuit "great". See also 70th Anniversary Edition of AMERICA April 21, 1979 article by Thurston Davis, S. J.) Unalterable opposed to the political philosophy of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, he was instructed by Roosevelt to cease and desist. Paul Blakely, who was on his deathbed, advised His Excellency that another article would appear in the next issue of AMERICA. 
Employment*27 June 1912  He was the editor of "America" magazine for many years. Wrote regularly for it under different pen names; First Mass College Church, St. Louis, MO. Remembrance card in file. on 27 June 1912 at Jesuit Priest; Society of Jesus, St. Louis, MO.3 
Last Edited7 Sep 2009

Citations

  1. [S17] SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.
  2. [S35] Lendrum Blakely.
  3. [S8] Family information.

Sarah Ann Blakely1

F, #52, b. 17 September 1829, d. 14 March 1882
SARAH ANN BLAKELY
SR. BEATRICE
Father*James B. Blakely b. 15 Jun 1804, d. 19 Jun 1882
Mother*Susananna Smyth b. 15 Sep 1804, d. 12 Nov 1885
Relationships2nd great-grandaunt of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
2nd great-grandaunt of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*17 September 1829 Sarah Ann Blakely was born on 17 September 1829 at Pittsburgh, PA.2 
 She was the daughter of James B. Blakely and Susananna Smyth
Baptism20 September 1829 She was baptized on 20 September 1829 at Pittsburgh, PA, She was baptized at Roman Catholic; St. Patrick/St. Paul. 
Death*14 March 1882 She died on 14 March 1882 at NE at age 52 She died in Nebraska.3 
Burial*19 February 1953 She was buried on 19 February 1953 at St. Joseph's Convent, St. Mary's, Elk County, PA, She died in Nebraska City. In 1953 her remains were removed and returned to St. Mary's PA. A newspaper article from St. Marys reads as follows: NUNS BODIES ARRIVE HERE The bodies of five nuns, one of them the first directress of St. Benedict Academy, arrived in St. Marys today from Nebraska City, Neb. One of the five, Mother Beatrice Blakely, was professed as a nun in St. Joseph's Convent in the early 1860's, leaving here for the middle west and later Nebraska where she passed away. Requiem Mass for the five will be celebrated at St. Joseh's Convent Chapel Saturday morning at eight o'clock. The bones will be reinterred in the Sisters' Cemetery. 
Name Variation  Sarah Ann Blakely was also known as Sr. Beatrice. 
Name Variation  Sarah Ann Blakely was also known as Sister Beatrice. 
Biography*1858  In 1858 According to History of Mc Kean, Elk, Cameron and Potter Co., PA p.651 "In 1858 Miss Sarah Ann Blakely received as a Postulant. She was the first directress of new academy up to 1863 when she moved to Nebraska City, Nebraska. The first Benedictine convent in the country was in St. Mary's PA.A letter from St. Joseph's convent in St. Mary's PA fills in the following detail: "Late in 1858, some postulants of English descent came to our convent. Among them was Sarah Ann Blakely, who from her 5th year in school was with the Sisters in our academy. (About 1840 ?) She was, therefore, well-educated. Through her, many well-to-do people were influenced to send their daughters to our academy." "In the course of time, many applications were received requesting sisters in St. Marys to take pupils as boarders. At first, children who were homeless were accepted, but soon many who were able and willing to pay also begged to be admitted. Sister Beatrice was the first Directress." 
Employment*1858 She wasCatholic nun History of McKean, Elk, Cameron and Potter Co., PA p. 651 - "In 1858 Miss Sarah Ann Blakely received as a Postulant (Sister Beatrice) she was first directress of new academy up to 1863 when she moved to Nebraska City, Neb. The first Benedictine convent in the country was in St. Mary's PA. One source states:" A new stone convent adjoining the St. Marys Church was erected in 1860 and in 1868 the present Academy building was added to the convent. Sister Beatrice Blakely was the first directress of the Academy and filled that position until 1865. The first pupil was Mrs. Luhr Blakely and the first graduate was Miss Margaret Connelly."
Interesting note from John Hayes a descendant of Alice Blakely DI recently talked with the archivist at the local Benedictine Convent. She was interested in finding out more about Sr. Beatrice. I am sending her a copy of the information from the family book.
She had suggested a book about the history of the Benedictines in the US. Of course the beginning of the book focused on St. Joseph's Benedictine Convent in St. Mary's PA. However, the work stops at about the time Sr. Beatrice came on the scene.
There is one scant note in the side note about her being a novice.
I am sure that there was no intention to exclude her, but the writer was focusing on the establishment of the other convents.
As a result, there is very little said about the establishment of the Annunciation School in Nebraska City, except for the fact that the Bishop of Lincoln, NE closed it down.
Actually, the info that you and Laura came up with comes up with the best.
By the way, along the way, Annunciation Academy becomes located in Kearney, NE.
This is mentioned in the location of Sr. Beatrice's death, and where Mary Louise Ryan and Evarista Ryan received part of their education.
I have a feeling that this may not be correct.
Did you get any of your information from the Convent at St. Mary's? Did you give them what information you had? did you have an opportunity to look over the archives. On the other hand, maybe the archives were in such shape that much had been lost.
Is there anything in Sebastian's diaries about the convent? By the way, where did you say they were located? Are they in English or German?
According to the book I read, Abbot Wimmer was anautocrat, particularly when it came to money for the Convent. He was known to spend the funds that were to be provided for the sisters.
Given the fact that there was a Wimmer in the family, it is interesting to note that Beatrice wanted to join and the nuns took her in. This may be why she was older when she went in, since the first superior and the abbot were always at each other's throats.
The nuns really had in hard in the early years.
Another thought, Sarah (Beatrice) didn't go in until her father became bankrupt. Any meaning there??
 in 1858 at Nun (Benedictine); O.S.B, St. Mary's, Elk County, PA
CENSUS1850*1860 She appeared on the CENSUS in 1860 at Benedictine Convent, St. Mary's, Elk County, PA; Census shows her at St. Mary's. Same census shows her parents still living in Pittsburg. Parents would move to St. Mary's before 1870. 
Last Edited12 Jul 2008

Citations

  1. [S78] Unknown subject unknown repository.
  2. [S38] Baptismal Entry St. Paul, Diocese of Pittsburgh
    Synod Hall
    125 N. Craig Street
    Pittsburgh, PA 15213
    412-621-6217 Fax 412-621-6237.
  3. [S463] "Sebastian Wimmer Diary,."

Stephens Buckner Cuthbert Blakely

M, #38, b. 14 July 1907, d. 26 September 1938
Father*Stephens Laurie Blakely b. 23 Apr 1878, d. 24 Feb 1959
Mother*Jane DeValcourt Stamps Piatt b. 12 Mar 1882, d. 6 Oct 1928
RelationshipsGranduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
Granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Landrum
De Calmes
PETER LANDRUM
SIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*14 July 1907 Stephens Buckner Cuthbert Blakely was born on 14 July 1907 at Covington, Kenton County, KY.1,2 
 He was the son of Stephens Laurie Blakely and Jane DeValcourt Stamps Piatt
Baptism28 July 1907 He was baptized on 28 July 1907 at Roman Catholic; St. Mary's Cathedral. 
MARRIAGE*31 August 1938 He married Marjorie Carson on 31 August 1938 at Blessed Sacrament Church, Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY.2 
Death*26 September 1938 He died on 26 September 1938 at Covington, KY, at age 31 He died of an industrial accident just days before he was to be admitted to the Kentucky Bar. His death left a gigantic hole in the family, and was memorialized by his Uncle Rev. Paul Lendrum Blakely in a privately published book "As We Remember Him". Copies of the book have been distributed to family members. 
Burial*28 September 1938 He was buried on 28 September 1938 at St. Marys Cemetery, Ft. Mitchell, Kenton County, KY.3 
Biography*  From Kay Ryan: A book - "As We Rememeber Him" - was written about Steve after his untimely death. When he was young, he would refer to himself as "Stephens Buckner Cuthbert Albert Nuttybutt Blakely". (Albert was his confirmation name) Steve was killed in an explosion at the Ashland Oil Refinery in Latonia, KY. He had been married just 27 days. He was awarded Attorney-at-Law posthumously. 
Employment* He was employed at Attorney. 

Family

Marjorie Carson b. circa 1907
MARRIAGE*31 August 1938 He married Marjorie Carson on 31 August 1938 at Fort Mitchell, KY.2 
Last Edited7 Sep 2009

Citations

  1. [S8] Family information.
  2. [S35] Lendrum Blakely.
  3. [S17] SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.

Stephens Laurie Blakely

M, #35, b. 23 April 1878, d. 24 February 1959
STEPHENS LAURIE BLAKELY
JOHN, STEPHENS AND JANE BLAKELY
Father*Laurie John Blakely b. 4 Mar 1843, d. 21 Jan 1917
Mother*Lily Hudson Lendrum b. 13 Sep 1852, d. 2 Apr 1922
RelationshipsGreat-grandfather of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
Great-grandfather of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Landrum
De Calmes
PETER LANDRUM
SIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Baptism1878 Stephens Laurie Blakely was baptized in 1878 at Covington, Kenton County, KY, Baptized by Rt. Rev. Bishop of Covington.1 
Birth*23 April 1878  The following is from SLB's "Reminiscences"

I was walking down Scott Street one hot summer afternoon and met Richard and we stopped and talked on the southwest corner of Pike and Scott Streets. Pike Street between Madison Ave and Scott Street used to be called Cooper Street after the Cooper family. Herndon Cooper's children are scattered over the country so that the name has disappeared in Covington, even Cooper Street.

Well, Richard is a most respectable colored man, a pensioner of the Shinkle family. He told me that I had been born in the third house south of Pike Street. I had always thought that I was born in the house on the corner, but he said that on this date, April 23, 1878, he was fifteen years old and was a boy in Spanglers Livery Stable and Mule Yard just across the street. He said he used to saddle my father's horse and bring him across the street so that my father could ride to his office which was only a few blocks away, for which he was frequently rewarded with Canadian dimes, nickles and sometimes quarters. He even had some of them in his pocket at the time. (Likely time 1940's)

My father Laurie J. Blakley entered the army of the Confederate States and after the surrender went to Canada where he remained for several years. He never talked much about his adventures, but I heard him mention this fact once or twice.

Richard's Canadian money was interesting because it was such a casual reminder of something that had happened eighty years before.

Note from MVW: this is a strange story. Why would a man give out tips in Canadian coins at least five years after he supposedly went to Canada. Funny he should be carrying them around that long. Story is particularly peculiar since there has been no evidence located that supports the story. July 2001

Bible entry reads: Laurie John Stephens Blakely first child and son of Laurie J. Blakely and Lilly his wife (and called 'Stephens" in honor of an old and dear friend N.B. Stephens) was born in Covington, Ky.1
MAP OF COVINGTON
 He was the son of Laurie John Blakely and Lily Hudson Lendrum
Engagement*November 1905  In November 1905 at Covington, KY, ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED

The engagement of Miss Jane Stamps Piatt and Stephens L. Blakely which has just been announced by the bride-elect's mother, Mrs. E. Courtney Piatt of Garrard St. is of interest not only in this city but also in Central Kentucky, owing to the prominence of both families. Miss Piatt is one of Covington's most beautiful and cultured young girls. Both are popular in Covington society and also in Lexington where Miss Piatt resided for a short time. The wedding will be a pretty, but quiet event early in June at St. Mary's Cathedral. - taken from a newspaper clipping. 
MARRIAGE*28 June 1906 He married Jane DeValcourt Stamps Piatt, daughter of Edward Courtney Piatt and Sallie Scott Richardson, on 28 June 1906 at St. Mary's Church, Covington, Kenton County, KY, The wedding invitation came only from mother and was reported in newspapers of the time. "The wedding nuptials of Miss Jane Stamps Piatt, the only daughter of Mrs. Sallie Richardson Piatt and Stephens L. Blakely, the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Laurie Blakely were solemnized Thursday morning at St. Mary's Cathedral. The bride was very beautiful in a robe of white Paris mull, with Valenincenes lace trimmings. She carried a bouquet of bride roses and asparagus vine and wore a tulle veil caught to her hair by a spray of orange blossoms. At her throat was a pendant of pearls and rubies, a bridal gift. After the ceremony the bridal party and immediate relatives repaired to the home of the bride's mother, where a handsome breakfast was served. The drawing room was decorated with carnations and ferns."
A guest list was given: Mr. and Mrs. DeVal Court Carroll, Theodore Kirk, Arthur Hubbard, John Menzies, Laurie Blakely, Sallie Piatt, Shelly Rouse, John Simrall, John Picton, Henry Walker, Benjamin McCutcheon, George McRoberts, Graddy Kennedy, J. M. Kennedy, Ida Foster, Misses Annabel Prague, Eisle Laidley, Edith Brennen, Edith Noonan, Helen and Mary Bum, Harriet and Grace Collins, Virginia Gooch, Anna Holmes, Emily Woodall, Marie Louise Blakely, Elizabeth and Susie Blakely, McVeighs, Jean Walker, Jane Martin, Virginia Martin, Emma Gallati, Mary Coombs, Fan Simrall, Messrs Brent Woodall, Stewart Walker, John Warner, Hugh Warner, and Sam Adams.2,3,1
MARRIAGE*1 June 1929 He married Margaret Howard James, daughter of Howard K. James and Margaret Hamilton, on 1 June 1929 at NY
This is the second marriage for both parties. Their former spouses had died. Former spouses had each been brother and sister. Stephens Laurie Blakely and Jacob W. Piatt, II had been best friends.3 
Burial*February 1959 He was buried in February 1959 at St. Mary's, Ft. Mitchell, Kenton County, KY
Death*24 February 1959 He died on 24 February 1959 at Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY, at age 80 The following was written about SLB at his death:
The master of "Beechwod" has gone to rest
The law books are closed at last
And a gentleman of distinguished mien
Has become a part of the past
Yet he lives in the hearts of his many friends
In the home which his presence knew
In the great white columns, the flickering fires
And the road where the beeches grew
One can circle the drive or mount the stairs
Or wander from room to room
And feel the strength of the legal giant
Beyond and above the tomb
Yes, the master of "Beechwood" has gone away
But remains an essential part
Of the history of a commonwealth
Which lived in his own great heart.
Written by Alice Kennelly Roberts for the Cincinatti Enquirer. 
ObituaryApril 1959 Obnituary of Stephens Laurie Blakely was The Editor's Desk Stephens L. Blakely
      by John R. Blakely

Stephens L. Blakely, a member and Third Vice-President of the Kentucky Historical Society, died at Covington, Kentucky, on Tuesday, February 24, 1959. He was eighty years old.Mr. Blakely was of English descent and was born in Covington, a son of Laurie John Blakely and Lillie Lendrum Blakely, on April 23, 1878. He was baptized in the Catholic faith. His forebears came to this country in the year 1632, settling in Westmoreland County, Virginia, and subsequently migrating to Kentucky, following the old Buffalo Trace along the Ohio River to the place of his birth.
Mr. Blakely received his early education at LaSallette Academy in Covington. Later he attended St. Xavier High School in Cincinnati, where he studied history, the sciences, Latin, Greek, and the philosophers, subjects considered fundamental to normal education in that period. In 1894 he began his course of prelegal studies at St. Xavier College, later Xavier University, in Cincinnati. It was here that his regard for constitutional law first asserted itself. He coupled his interest with a talent for clear expression of thought. By the time he was only twenty years old, he had written several articles on the Constitution and recognized it as an instrument of freedom. The ideals formed in these early years were soundly grounded and never changed. He loved liberty of the individual, of thought, and of expression, and the independence granted to man by the natural law.
Following his graduation from college in 1898 he attached himself as a law clerk to one of the older lawyers then practicing in Covington. A formal legal education was not at that time a prerequisite to admission to practice in Kentucky. Realizing, however, that there is no short way to a thorough training of the mind in its chosen field, he enrolled at the old McDonald Institute, later the Chase School of Law, in Cincinnati, and after graduation was admitted to the bar of Kentucky in 1903.
His early years of practice testify to a wealth of ambition and enterprise. Clients do not come easily to a young lawyer who has just hung out his shingle. But he was fortunate in soon being accepted as a junior associate in one of the larger Covington firms at a salary of $6.00 per week, with all expenses paid! If work was not available, he sought it out. He was commissioned by his firm to abstract and codify a record of all deeds and encumbrances relating to real property located in Kenton County. The job was completed shortly prior to the year 1910 and is now a permanent part of the records at the Kenton County Clerk's office in Covington. It is consulted frequently as source material for real estate title examinations.
In 1907 he married Jane Stamps Piatt, the daughter of Edward Courtney Piatt and Sallie R. Piatt of Covington. A short time after their marriage they moved to Beechwood Road, now a part of South Fort Mitchell, a suburb located about five miles south of Covington. There they occupied a home which was destroyed by fire in 1911. The present homestead, called "Beechwood", was completed in 1912. It is located on an eminence overlooking, (as shown by its deed) "the meanders of Pleasant Run Creek." During the War Between the States, the territory surrounding the home was the scene of skirmishes involving the attacking Confederates under General Heath, and the Union army under General Wallace, defending Fort Mitchell.
The depth of his mind and the force of his personality combined with is quick wit and a refreshing modesty to produce a young man destined for many years of success in the law. In 1910 he was appointed solicitor for the City of Covington. He retired from that position in 1914 upon his election as Commonwealth's attorney for the Sixteenth Judicial District of Kentucky. Except for a leave of absence granted in 1918 to serve with the United States Army, he held this office until 1920, when he was defeated for re-election.
For many years following his retirement to private practice, Mr. Blakely devoted much of his time to the practice of criminal, municipal, and constitutional law in the state and federal courts. He was recognized as one of the outstanding trial lawyers of the Kentucky Bar. In a sketch of him, The Cincinnati Enquirer had this to say:
"Tall, well built, and with a shock of grey hair, Blakely has a booming voice and an imposing courtroom manner and is at his best before a jury."
In 1928 his wife died after a short illness. About a year thereafter, he married Margaret James Piatt of Tiffin, Ohio, the daughter of Howard K. James and Margaret H. James, formerly of Covington. Together they raised six children through the difficult period caused by the great depression.
In 1934 he was again appointed solicitor for the City of Covington. He served in that capacity until 1937, when he retired to accept the position of legal counsel for the Cincinnati, Newport & Covington Transportation Company. He became director and secretary of the organization, serving as such until the time of his death.
The later years of his life were devoted almost exclusively to the service of corporate clients attracted to him by his wisdom and logic and the soundness of his advice. In 1948 he founded the law firm of Blakely, Moore & Blakely, with which he was associated for the remainder of his lifetime. He belonged to the American and Kentucky Bar Associations and was a member and former president of the Kenton County Bar Association.
Mr. Blakely was a staunch advocate of states' right and as such took an active part in the national election campaigns in 1948 and 1956. He was firm in his belief that the individual states ought to be free to control their own destiny without unwarranted interference from centralized authority.
Always keenly interested in history, local and of the Commonwealth, Mr. Blakely was a founder, in 1949, of the Christopher Gist Historical Society of Covington, and was its first president. He was an active member of the Literary Club of Cincinnati and delivered frequent addresses before that group. He was a prolific writer on legal, constitutional, historical, and related subjects. Among his published articles were "In the Palace Grounds", "Lawyers", "Charles Dickens", "Bonnie Prince Charlie", "A Kentucky Mystery", "Thorne Hill", and "Belle Boyd, a Fantasy Based on Logic".
He was an active member of Blessed Sacrament Parish in South Fort Mitchell. He belonged to the Fort Mitchell Country Club and was one of its founders in the year 1904. He was a charter member and past commander of the Norman-Barnes Post of the American Legion in Covington. He participated in the affairs of many church, social, and historical organizations of local and national character. A scholarship was established in his honor at Xavier University on Christmas of 1958.
He is survived by his widow; five children, Jacob Wykoff Piatt, Mrs. Earl L. Carran, Mrs. Clay E. Delauney, Mrs. John R. Woodrough, and John R. Blakely; two sisters, Mrs. Lewis Baldwin and Mother Jane Frances; one brother, Laurie J. Blakely; and eight grandchildren.
In his lifetime Stephens L. Blakely rejected the concept of "something for nothing" just as he rejected the evils inherent in the so called "welfare state". He was convinced the hope of gaining something without giving up anything in return is at the root of every human failure. His principles were right and his direction true. He knew that investment comes before return and that we must give before we receive. The qualities most characteristic of this great and lovable person were his patience, understanding, integrity, and compassion, and his deep respect for the dignity of man. His practice of these virtues engendered in him the boundless faith he had in himself, in his fellow man, and in his God.

From Kay Ryan:(Kentucky Times Star Newspaper dated Oct 22, 1919, pg. 28)
BLAKELY GETS INVITATIONS TO MEET KING
Letter received from G. A. Aerts, Belgian Consul          Commonwealth Attorney Stephens L. Blakely of Covington Wednesday received a special invitation from G. A. Aerts, Belgian consul in Cincinnati, to meet their majesties; the King and Queen of Belgium. Blakely expressed pleasure over the receipt of the following letter from Mr. Aerts:
     My Dear Mr. Blakely:      I take great pleasure in handing you herewith six cards, which will enable you to pass through the guard, in order to be presented to their majesties, the King and Queen of Belgium, on Wednesday at 4 o'clock at Music hall.     When introducing you and your friends, I want to tell the King what you have done for the cause of Belgium.      Believe me,     Yours Sincerely, (signed) G. A. Aerts


(part of a Newspaper article from the Kentucky Post Final Edition)There's a date written 2-24-1959 - I don't know if that's the papers date or the death date.
          STEPHENS L. BLAKELY DIES AT AGE 80     Veteran Lawyer Had Been Ill Since February 6
     The 55-year-old legal career of Stephens L. Blakely, 80, Covington attorney, was ended by death Tuesday at St. Elizabeth Hospital.
     Mr. Blakely, who twice served as Covington city solicitor and once as Kenton county commonwealth attorney, was the senior partner in the law firm of Blakely, Moore, Blakely & O'Hara at 106 E. third street, Covington. His home was at 116 Beechwood road, South Ft. Mitchell.
     In recent years, Mr. Blakely served as legal counsel for the Green Line and the Union Light, Heat & Power Co.
     He served as city solicitor from 1910 to 1914 and from 1932 to 1935. He was commonwealth attorney from 1914 to 1920. Although a Democrat, Mr. Blakely was a staunch believer in States Rights.
     Mr. Blakely, who had been ill about 3 weeks, was admitted to the hospital Feb. (Con't on page 3, col 1---don't have that page)


(Newspaper obituary, Cincinnati Enquirer, dated Feb. 25, 1959, pg 8A)
LONG CAREER ENDED FOR STEPHENS BLAKELY
     Stephens L. Blakely, Covington lawyer and historian, died at 5 a.m. yesterday at St. Elizabeth Hospital, following a three-week illness. He was 80 years old.
     Mr. Blakely, a lawyer for 53 years, lived at 116 Beechwwod Rd., South Ft. Mitchell. He was senior partner in the firm of Blakely, Moore, Blakely & O'Hara, Covington. He served as Covington city solicitor from 1910 to 1914, Commonwealth's Attorney from 1914 to 1920 and solicitor again from 1932 to 1935.
     In recent years, Mr. Blakely served as legal counsel for the Cincinnati, Newport & Covington Transportation Co. and Union Light, Heat & Power Co. He was appointed a member of the Civil War Centennial Committee by Governor Chandler. A Democrat, he was a firm believer in states' rights.
     Mr. Blakely was one of six veteran lawyers honored last December at an annual meeting of the Kenton county Bar Association. All had served more than 50 years in the profession.
     He was a member of Blessed Sacrament Church, South Ft. Mitchell, Holy Name Society, Ft. Mitchell County Club, Literary Club of Cincinnati, Christopher Gist Historical Society, Ohio Historical and Philosophical Society, Kenton Historical Society, Caledonian Society, the Medievalists, Kentucky Civil War Roundtable and American and Kentucky Bar Associations. He was a graduate of St. Xavier High School and Xavier University, Cincinnati.
     He leaves his wife, Mrs. Margaret J. Blakely; three daughters, Mrs. Jane B. Woodrought, South Ft. Mitchell, Mrs. Page Carran, Ft. Mitchell and Mrs. Clay E. Delauney, Charlottsville, N.C; two sons John R. Blakely a member of the law firm and J. Kykoff Piatt, Middletown, Ohio; a brother, Laurie J. Blakely, Lexington; two sisters Mother Jane Frances Blakely, Cardome Academy, Georgetown and Mrs. Louis Baldwin, Chicago, and eight grandchildren.
     John R. Blakely and his sister, Mrs. Woodrough, have announced establishment of the Stephens L. and Margaret J. Blakely Annual Scholarship at Xavier University for prelaw students from Kenton county.
     Solemn Requiem High Mass will be sung at 9 a.m. tommorrow at Blessed Sacrament Church. Prayers will be same at 8:30 a.m. at the residence where friends may call from 4 to 9 p.m. today. Burial will be in St. Mary Cemetery. in April 1959 at Fort Mitchell, KY.4 
Note* He Family stories tell that the Blakely family is related to Ashton, Houghton, Lendrum, Rudds, Ruffner, Weakland, Smythe and Buckners. Some of these connections have been found and others (Ashton, Houghton and Weakland) are still missing although there was an old note and picture in SLB's attic that indicates the pictures are of Haughton ancestors. 
Name Variation1878  This information from a bible record. 
CENSUS1880*1 June 1880 He appeared on the Census on 1 June 1880 at Covington, Kenton County, KY; Occupation shown as lawyer and birthplace shown as Virginia. This is the first time since 1850 that Laurie Blakely gives his birthplace as Virginia. All previous census show him born in Pennsylvania. Also, in this census his mother is shown as having been born in Maryland. This is clearly wrong and leads one to think that perhaps his wife, Lillie, gave the information and simply got it wrong or perhaps this was what she was told. Lillie did in fact come from a Virginia family that traced its roots back to George Washington.5
Residence*1880 He and Laurie John Blakely lived in 1880 at Covington, Kenton County, KY; According to the 1880 census. They lived at house #207 and are shown on page 26 line 34. They had two servants Phoebe Coleman and Kate Garrett. 
Graduation*29 June 1898 He was graduated on 29 June 1898 at St. Xavier College, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, OH.3 
CENSUS1900*1900 He appeared on the census in 1900; Shown as: BLAKELEY........ Steven L. BLAKELEY.
1900 CENSUS FOR STEPHENS L. BLAKELY
Employment*1901 He was employed in 1901 at Attorney, Covington, Kenton County, KY.4
MAP OF COVINGTON KENTUCKY
HONEYMOON*June 1906  Jane and Stephens went to Greenbriar Hotel and spent two weeks on honeymoon. in June 1906 at Greenbriar Hotel.
GEORGIA ROW
GREENBRIAR HOTEL
Graduation26 June 1906 He was graduated on 26 June 1906 at McDonald Law School, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, OH; Law certificate in MVW file. 
DEED*1908  A newspaper clipping taken from SLB's scrapbook states the following about the purchase of home and land where Beechwood would be built: "Annie M and Mary P. Thorburg to Jane Piatt Blakely 4.14 acres of land on the Pleasant Run Creek $2,400." in 1908 at Fort Mitchell, KY
DEED*1908 He was shown on a deed in 1908 at sale; 4 acres Kenton county, Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY, This is at least part of the land on which Beechwood would be built. He bought the land from Annie and Mary Thorburn. There was an old house on the property that burned (pictures in MVW file). Later Beechwood was built on the property.
EARLY BEECHWOOD.
FIRE*15 November 1911  On 15 November 1911 at Ft. Mitchell, Kenton County, KY, RESCUES SICK WIFE IN A FIRE
Attorney Stephens L. Blakely, prominent in Covington politics, was seriously burned in the destruction of his home by fire on Beechwood Ave Ft. Mitchell, Wednesday morning. He received his burns after saving his wife and three children under unusual circumstances. He was awaken at 3:30 in the morning by the smell of smoke, and found the room choked. He rushed across the hall to his wife's room where she was with their 11 day old child (John Buckner Blakely). He carried her downstairs, but could not get outdoors, because the porch was all aflame. He finally got her to safety by lowering her from the parlor window. He then saved Stephens, 4 Courtney 3 and Jane 18 months in the same manner. With this family safe, Blakely rushed back into the house in an attempt to put out the flames. He was severely burned about the hands and feet. Nearly overcome, he was carried to the home of neighbors. Mrs. Blakely was taken to the home of friends with her children but, it is feared the shock may be serious. The fire, it is believed was caused by a defective flue. The house was destroyed, resulting in a $3,000 loss. Blakely will be appointed city solicitor under Mayor-elect "Pat" Philipps. - Account taken from newspaper article.
FIRST BEECHWOOD
BURNED
FIRE PICTURE
BEECHWOOD FROM THE BRIDGE
ORIGINAL BEECHWOOD
JANE PIATT BLAKELY
Employment2 January 1912 He was employed by City Solicitor Covington, KY on 2 January 1912 at Covington, KY.3
STEPHENS L. BLAKELY
STEPHENS L. BLAKELY
OFFICE
BiographyOctober 1917  Here is an exccerpt from a piece written in 2007 by the Covington Historical Society. It sheds light on a little know side of Stephens L. Blakely. SLB was awarded a flag pole with a bronze inscription plaque in thanks for his activities. Evidentally the flag pole fell and the plaque was stored in the attic of Beechwood.

Covington also had a group like the American Patriot League. However the city’s group was one that achieved national press and became a powerful force during this time. This organization was called the Citizen’s Patriot League. Formed in 1917 with twenty-five members, by 1919 it claimed more than one thousand members.ii Stamm, German-American Population, 10. It was the most visible and probably the most powerful local patriotic organization. The League held mass meetings attended by prominent members of the community. The organization raised support for it’s anti-German acts with emotional rhetoric to generate publicity so that its members could pressure public officials to pass laws that the group supported.iii Ibidi The goals of the CPL were to eliminate German in schools as well as other foreign languages; no German language in media; and sought the deportation of any American of foreign birth, who did not support the United States in the war.iiii Ibid     ii They campaigned against German newspapers, against individuals, and pushed their agenda on what they believed a pro-German person was.iiv Ibid, 11v

The first meeting of the CPL was held in October of 1917.vv The Kentucky Post, October 18, 1917. Many influential people, such as the Mayor of Covington, [name?] the Commonwealth’s attorney for Kenton County, Stephens Blakely and many more, attended this meeting.vvi Ibidi Stephens Blakely would become a major player in the anti-German movements that evolved in Covington.

In order to accomplish its goals, the CPL did several things. The group wrote resolutions that contained the opinions of the League; signed by members and mailed to officials or groups.vvii Stamm, German-American Population, 11.ii The CPL sent out 200 members to homes and saloons across the city to hang posters warning of punishments to be inflicted upon pro-Germans.vviii Ibid, 12iii One of the first places the group focused were the saloons owned and operated by Germans. The most famous case was Joe Janson. Janson was a saloon owner whose license was revoked.iix Ibid     x Stephens Blakely, a known member of the CPL and the Commonwealth’s Attorney led the case against him.xx Ibid Eventually Janson recovered his license but he had lost money, and was painted as pro-German by the CPL.

Another concern for the CPL was to inform the public of the German war crimes that were committed. The group, led by Stephens Blakely, wrote a proposal and urged the government to make all German War Crimes public.xxi Ibid,13i It wanted the government to photograph victims in France and Belgium and then send them to every home in America.xxii Ibidii At one meeting Blakely claimed that German soldiers “gas their enemies in the trenches,” “gouge out their eyes,” and “cut off arms and legs”xxiii Ibidiii The CPL meetings included descriptions of German war atrocities. Eventually the government would respond to the League’s suggestion that those living in the rural parts of the state may not be informed enough about what was going on over seas. The Bureau of Public Information in Washington agreed to send literature to all fourth class postmasters to be placed in every rural mailbox throughout the state.xxiv Ibidiv

Besides the resolutions that the group passed, it was also involved in violent acts. Mobs, usually members of the CPL, attacked those who they felt were pro-German. Stephens Blakely, Harvey Myers and John O’Neal led many of these mobs.xxv Frederick W. Schmitz, “An Open Reply to John Richmond, President Blakely Club Concerning Patriotic Activities” World War I file at Kenton County Public Library, (July 1921) 5,9,14 v Paul W. Flynn, a farmer and lifelong resident of Kenton County was surrounded by a howling mob, stripped naked and horsewhipped until he signed a paper for a War Savings stamp worth $11,000.xxvi Ibid, 5vi He was attacked because he had not bought any stamps prior to the incident and this was considered as not supporting the war. John Schneider Jr. was beaten and horsewhipped by the CPL because it was said he insulted the Red Cross.xxvii Ibid, 8vii Father Goebel, a Catholic Priest was visited by the CPL one night at his home. He was insulted, slapped and kicked by a mob led by Blakely and a placard nailed to his church door because it was rumored he was preaching “kaiserism.”xxviii Ibid, 10viii On the other hand, when the CPL visited Father Henry Tappert, German-born pastor of Covington’s Mother of God Church [Mutter Gottes Kirche] warning him to cease preaching in German, he simply told them, “Gentlemen, ve send our boys to the trenches in France, und ve vill continue to preach in German, good day!” Father Tappert exuded such a charismatic aura that the visitors simple melted away and never bothered the parish again! The clergy continued to preach auf Deutch until the new pastor, Rev. Edward Klosterman arrived in 1930 when it was apparent most parishioners no longer understood the tongue.xxix Parish records & personal interview of Edward Strubel (1991)ix But the situation for Mother of God Parish was certainly the exception.

Schoberg Case
Members of the CPL also took it upon themselves to investigate individuals. Information that they collected about individuals was turned over to officials and then used to prosecute these individuals.xxx Stamm, German-American Population, 14x One such case was what became known as the Schoberg Case. This case actually involved seven people. However, only three were convicted: Charles Bernard Schoberg, J. Henry Kruse and Henry Feltman. The men were arrested for seditious acts while having private conversations at Schoberg’s shoe shop in Latonia (Covington), Kentucky.xxxi Merriman, “An Intensive School of Disloyalty,”183xi

The men came under suspicion of the CPL when other citizens heard Schoberg’s supposedly “pro-German” statements.xxxii Ibid, 186xii Once they came under suspicion, the CPL paid the W. H. Detective Bureau of Cincinnati to install a dictograph in Schoberg’s grandfather clock.xxxiii Ibidxiii It was in place in March of 1918 and from March to July they listened to whispered conversations from the basement of a bank next door to Schoberg’s shop. The listeners took notes of only disloyal or “pro-German” conversations over the ticking and tolling of the grandfather clock. The primitive technology made the conversations hardly audible.xxxiv Ibidxiv By July 14, 1918, the CPL felt enough “evidence” had been collected and Kruse, Schoberg, Feltman and four others were arrested for seditious acts. The notes taken by the detectives were used as a base for a federal grand jury on August 6, 1918.xxxv Ibid, 187xv The indictments alleged that: 1) the defendants tried to favor the cause of Germany and Austria-Hungary, 2) they opposed the United States, 3) intended to bring the armed forces of the United States into contempt, scorn, and disrespect, 4) cause and incite insubordination, disloyalty, mutiny and refusal of duty in the armed forces of the U.S.xxxvi Ibidxvi The vague generalities of the amended Espionage Act of May 1918 could be applied with ease!

All of the defendants pleaded not guilty. Each man testified as to never saying anything pro-German, each attesting to their efforts to support the war by buying war bonds and donating to the Red Cross.xxxvii Ibid188-192xvii The detectives who installed the dictograph and listened to their conversations testified as to what the defendants had said.xxxviii Ibid, 187xviii All three were convicted and sent to prison at Moundville. When they appealed to Federal Pardon Attorney J.A. Finch, the American Legion and the CPL, led by Stephens Blakely, gathered around ten thousand signatures opposing the release.xxxix Ibid, 201xix [An appeal to President Wilson for a pardon was ignored – editor].

The men had to wait until 1921, when their sentences were commuted by President Warren G. Harding.xxxx Ibid, 203xx All the evidence used to convict these men was paid for by the Citizen’s Patriot League. The dictograph cost the CPL around $1,000 to $1,500, and even though these were private conversations that were barely audible on the tapes, the evidence was still allowed into court and used by the prosecutor. xxxxi Ibid, 186xxi

After the War
From all of this activity, Covington gained a certain amount of notoriety as a result of the actions of the Citizens Patriot League. Its actions were known nationwide. A national magazine called Manufacturing Record featured Covington for having “set an example which it would be well for every community throughout the nation to follow.”xxxxii Stamm, German-American Population, 14xxii It went on to laud Covington for its mass meetings and resolutions, reprinting the resolutions in full and encouraging other communities to imitate Covington.xxxxiii Ibidxxiii

By the end of the war the CPL boasted at having over one thousand members.xxxxiv Ibid, 10xxiv They had successfully repressed German newspapers so that the Volksblatt could only be delivered by mail in Covington; the German language was dropped from the school system, and even from the streets for fear of retaliation for speaking German. The CPL had been successful.

Although it was the strongest and most successful, the CPL was not the only anti-German group in Northern Kentucky at this time. There were groups such as the Kenton County Council of Defense, Central Covington Patriotic League, and Campbell County Council of Defense.xxxxv Ibid, 14..                    Bibliography.Cincinnati German Street Names Project: Document. Edited by Franziska C. Ott.     Public Affairs Committee. German American Citizens League of Greater .     Cincinnati, 1995..Coppa, Frank J., and Thomas J. Curran. The Immigrant Experience in America. .Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1976..“Covington City Commissioners Meeting Minutes.” 1914 to 1918, Kenton County Library..From the Land of Freedom: German Immigrants Write Home. Edited by.     Walter D. Kamphoefner. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1988.. Harlon, Alvin F. The Serene Cincinnatians. New York: E P Dutton & Company, 1950..Hawgood, John Arkas. The Tragedy of German America. New York: Arno Press, 1970..Higham, John. Strangers in the Land: Patterns of American Nativism 1860-1925. .     New York: Atheneum, 1965..Keller, Phyllis. States of Belonging: German-American Intellectuals and the First World.     War. Harvard: Harvard University Press, 1979..Merriman, Scott A. An Intensive School of Disloyalty: The C.B. Schoberg Case under      The Espionage and Sedition Acts in Kentucky during World War I,” Registrar of Kentucky Historical Society, vol. 98, no. 2. Spring 2000. .Merriman, Scott A. Ordinary People in Extraordinary Times? Defendants, Attorneys, and the Federal     .government’s Policy Under the Espionage Acts During WWI it Court of Appeals District. Ph.D. diss., University of Kentucky, 2003..Schmitz, Frederick W. “An Open Reply to John Richmond, President of Blakely Club .Concerning Patriotic Activities” World War I file at Kenton County Public .Library, July 1921..The Cincinnati Germans Scrapbook of Articles. Edited by Don Heinrich Tolzmann. .     Cincinnati German American Studies Program, University of Cincinnati, 2003..The Germans In America 1607-1970. Edited by Howard B. Furer. .New York: Oceana Publications Inc, 1973. .The Kentucky Post..Tolzmann, Don Heinrich. Cincinnati’s German Heritage. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, 1998.     .Tolzmann, Don Heinrich. Covington’s German Heritage. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, 1998.     .Tolzmann, Don Heinrich. German Heritage Guide to The Greater Cincinnati Area. .     Milford: Little Miami Publishing Co., 2003..Tolzmann, Don Heinrich. The Cincinnati Germans After the Great War. New York: P. Lang, 1987.xxv All of these groups’ actions paralleled the actions of the CPL.

When World War I ended, life did not automatically go back to what it was like before. Those accused of being pro-German were still held in suspicion. The Citizens Patriotic League did not disappear until the 1920s and there were still people serving sentences for sedition. Perhaps it was the Great Depression that helped erase the hatred of everything German. The population was too busy surviving to worry about who spoke German. During World War II, the German population was not persecuted to the same extent. Whatever the cause for the disappearance of the hatred of everything German, it is gone. Covington celebrates its German heritage through Oktoberfest in Cincinnati and in Covington’s Main Strasse area. Today the community has re-discovered its German heritage, even though the bi-lingual nature of Greater Cincinnati German-American culture has never been recaptured.6
      
Employment1934 He was employed by City Solicitor Covington, KY; Covington, KY in 1934 at Covington, KY.3 
Residence*1959 He lived in 1959 at 116 Beechwood Road, Ft. Mitchell, Kenton County, KY; Blakely family lived in the home called "Beechwood" for many years. Property was first purchased from two maiden ladies named Thorburn. The original house on the site burned Nov. 14, 1911.
Here is a newspaper account of the fire dated November 15, 1911:
"Attorney Stephens L. Blakely, prominent in Covington politics, was seriously burned in the destruction of his home by fire on Beechwood Avenue, Ft. Mitchell, Wednesday morning. He received his burns after saving his wife and three children under unusual circumstances. He was awakened at 3:30 in the morning by the smell of smoke and found the room choked. He rushed across the hall to his wife's room where she was with their 11 day old child. He carried her downstairs, but could not get outdoors, because the porch was all aflame. He finally got her to safety by lowering her from the parlor window. He then saved Stephens, 4, Courtney 3 and Jane 1.5 in the same manner.
With his family safe, Blakely rush back into the house in an attempt to put out the flames. He was active on the second floor when severely burned about the hands and feet. Nearly overcome, he was carried to the home of neighbors. Mrs. Blakely was taken to the home of friends with her children, but it is feared the shock may be serious. The fire, it is believed , was caused by a defective flue. The house was destroyed, resulting in a $3,000 loss. Blakely will be appointed city solicitor under Mayor-elect "Pat" Philipps.
The home was replaced with a brick structure. According to SLB's date diary the family spent the first night in their new house on July 19, 1913. However, a later entry in same diary states" Began my new house on Sept 13, 1913" since the diary is a typed one I suspect that an error was made in transcription. (Their are other "errors" in the diary).
BEECHWOOD AFTER THE FIRE
BEECHWOOD
Biography*2002  There are many photographs in the possession of MVW showing Stephens L. Blakely from the time he was a student through until retirement. In addition, he left numerous diaries of travel and several early diaries written as a young man. All of these are in MVW file in 1999. Laura Woodrough Glass has copies of the diaries. When "Beechwood" was cleaned out for the final time following the death of John Ruffner Blakely in 1999, numerous interesting items were salvaged from the attic among which were the bankruptcy papers of his grandfather, James Blakely. (bankruptcy papers donated to Ohio Historical Society) All are in the care of MVW. 
Misc*2002  The following is a wonderful recipe for a Mint Julep that deserves to be preserved.
THE MINT JULEP CEREMONY

The preparation of the quintessence of gentlemanly beverages can be described only in like terms. A mint julep is not the product of a formula. It is a ceremony and must be performed by a gentleman possessing a true sense of the artistic, a deep reverence for the ingredients and a proper appreciation of the occasion.

It is a rite that must not be entrusted to a novice, a statistician, or a Yankee. It is a heritage of the Old South, an emblem of hospitality, and a vehicle in which noble minds can travel together upon flower-strewn paths of a happy and congenial thought.

Go to a spring where cool, crystal-clear water bubbles from under a bank of dew-washed ferns. In a consecrated vessel, dip up a little water at the source. Follow the stream through its banks of green moss and wildflowers until it broadens and trickles through beds of mint growing in aromatic profusion and waving softly in the summer breeze. Gather the sweetest and tenderest shoots and gently carry them home. Go to the sideboard and select a decanter of Kentucky Bourbon, distilled by a master hand, mellowed with age yet still vigorous and inspiring. An ancestral sugar bowl, a row of silver goblets, some spoons and some ice and you are ready to start.

Into a canvas bag, pound twice as much ice as you think you will need. Make it fine as snow, keep it dry, and do not allow it to degenerate into slush.

Into each goblet, put a slightly heaping teaspoonful of granulated sugar, barely cover this with spring water and slightly bruise one mint leaf into this, leaving the spoon in the goblet. Then pour elixir from the decanter until the goblets are about one-fourth full. Fill the goblets with snowy ice, sprinkling in a small amount of sugar as you fill. Wipe the outside of the goblets dry and embellish copiously with mint.

Then comes the important and delicate operation of frosting. By proper manipulation of the spoon, the ingredients are circulated and blended until Nature, wishing to take a further hand and add another of its beautiful phenomena, encrusts the whole in a glistening coat of white frost. Thus harmoniously blended by the deft touches of a skilled hand, you have a beverage eminently appropriate for honorable men and beautiful women.

When all is ready, assemble your guests on the porch or in the garden, where the aroma of the juleps will rise heavenwards and make the birds sing. Propose a worthy toast, raise the goblet to your lips, bury your nose in the mint, inhale a deep breath of its fragrance, and sip the nectar of the gods.

Being overcome by thirst, I can write no further. Lt. Gen Simon Bolivar Buckner - 1937. 

Family 1

Jane DeValcourt Stamps Piatt b. 12 March 1882, d. 6 October 1928
MARRIAGE*28 June 1906 He married Jane DeValcourt Stamps Piatt, daughter of Edward Courtney Piatt and Sallie Scott Richardson, on 28 June 1906 at Covington, KY, The wedding invitation came only from mother and was reported in newspapers of the time. "The wedding nuptials of Miss Jane Stamps Piatt, the only daughter of Mrs. Sallie Richardson Piatt and Stephens L. Blakely, the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Laurie Blakely were solemnized Thursday morning at St. Mary's Cathedral. The bride was very beautiful in a robe of white Paris mull, with Valenincenes lace trimmings. She carried a bouquet of bride roses and asparagus vine and wore a tulle veil caught to her hair by a spray of orange blossoms. At her throat was a pendant of pearls and rubies, a bridal gift. After the ceremony the bridal party and immediate relatives repaired to the home of the bride's mother, where a handsome breakfast was served. The drawing room was decorated with carnations and ferns."
A guest list was given: Mr. and Mrs. DeVal Court Carroll, Theodore Kirk, Arthur Hubbard, John Menzies, Laurie Blakely, Sallie Piatt, Shelly Rouse, John Simrall, John Picton, Henry Walker, Benjamin McCutcheon, George McRoberts, Graddy Kennedy, J. M. Kennedy, Ida Foster, Misses Annabel Prague, Eisle Laidley, Edith Brennen, Edith Noonan, Helen and Mary Bum, Harriet and Grace Collins, Virginia Gooch, Anna Holmes, Emily Woodall, Marie Louise Blakely, Elizabeth and Susie Blakely, McVeighs, Jean Walker, Jane Martin, Virginia Martin, Emma Gallati, Mary Coombs, Fan Simrall, Messrs Brent Woodall, Stewart Walker, John Warner, Hugh Warner, and Sam Adams.2,3,1
Children

Family 2

Margaret Howard James b. 5 August 1888, d. 27 June 1974
MARRIAGE*1 June 1929 He married Margaret Howard James, daughter of Howard K. James and Margaret Hamilton, on 1 June 1929 at NY
This is the second marriage for both parties. Their former spouses had died. Former spouses had each been brother and sister. Stephens Laurie Blakely and Jacob W. Piatt, II had been best friends.3 
Last Edited25 Apr 2016

Citations

  1. [S35] Lendrum Blakely.
  2. [S79] Unknown subject unknown repository.
  3. [S17] SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.
  4. [S8] Family information.
  5. [S56] 1880 Census;, Enumeration date June 10, 1880 p. 26 line 34
    T9-0425 P.228B.
  6. [S600] Karl Lietzenmayer, "unknown short title," e-mail to mvw, Sept 2007.

Susan Blakely

F, #231, b. 1875, d. 31 May 1955
Father*William James Blakely b. 26 Apr 1839, d. 7 Jan 1877
Mother*Mary Gensheimer b. 1850, d. c 1930
Relationships1st cousin 3 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
1st cousin 3 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
Birth*1875 Susan Blakely was born in 1875 at Erie, PA.1 
 She was the daughter of William James Blakely and Mary Gensheimer
Death*31 May 1955 She died on 31 May 1955 at Seaton Hill, PA
Biography*  Head of French Department at Seaton Hill College. 
Name Variation  Susan Blakely was also known as Sr. Mary Claire. 
Employment*1893  In 1893

The following taken from SLB's "Reminescenses"

Daughters, Sister Mary Aloysius (Josephine) and Susan (Sister Mary Clare), entered religion and for awhile were at Seaton Hall College, Greensburg, Pennsylvania. Both are now dead. I (SLB) had a letter from Sister Mary Clare dated March 29, 1955, giving me some information about our grandfather. She died shortly afterwards.
 
Last Edited12 Sep 2005

Citations

  1. [S56] 1880 Census;, Shown living with mother and grandfather.

Susan Haughton Blakely

F, #207, b. 23 May 1885, d. 22 January 1981
SUSAN HOUGHTON BLAKELY
"AUNT SUE"
Father*Laurie John Blakely b. 4 Mar 1843, d. 21 Jan 1917
Mother*Lily Hudson Lendrum b. 13 Sep 1852, d. 2 Apr 1922
RelationshipsGreat-grandaunt of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
Great-grandaunt of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Landrum
PETER LANDRUM
SIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Baptism Susan Haughton Blakely was baptized She was baptized at Mother of God Church Sponsors Joseph Van Lenner and wife. 
Birth*23 May 1885 She was born on 23 May 1885 at Covington, Kenton County, KY, Born at 53 E. Fourth St., Covington, KY.1,2,3 
 She was the daughter of Laurie John Blakely and Lily Hudson Lendrum
Death*22 January 1981 She died on 22 January 1981 at 'Cardome', Georgetown, KY, at age 95 The following was written May 19, 1981 by MVW about the death of "Aunt Sue":
Susan Houghton Blakely left a small worldly legacy. There was an enormous stack of America Magazines all nicely annotated to point out her brother Paul's writings. No doubt she read each word more than once. Paul's writings seem a bit dated in 1981 as many of the issues are either long dead or have been resolved. However, they were the fire of the times. One topic discussed in Paul's "America" writings was the right to die without artificial means of support in the event of a terminal illness. Aunt Sue had carefully "dog-eared" this article. As always, she was conversant on the current issues of the day. She was not one to dwell in the past, but rather she stood on the shoulders of the past as she reached for the sky. There were a few pictures, but most were so dusty that they resembled ghosts. They were ghosts of a far time when women wore long skirts, corsets, large hats and stood demurely. she appears in the small pictures in scenes with her brother Laurie, her school mates and her cousin. Sue was thing, shy, but charming and very intelligent. Shortly after the pictures were taken she would put aside the large hats with the feathers and the swishy skirts. Her life took an alternative path from her friends. How could she know at that far time that she would live until the week that the space shuttle would be launched and retrieved? Her life spanned one of the most significant centuries in the history of the world. Her life was equally significant to the events of the century for she affected people as profoundly as any famous hero. Among the few items she left was a memorial card indicating that she had celebrated her golden jubilee of religious profession on May 8, 1962. She would live another nineteen years after the jubilee. she lived so long that friends started to think she was the exception to the rule that all men must die. The universal comment made upon hearing of her death was, "I thought she would live forever." Also, there were two lovely certificates of a Papal blessing from Pope Paul neatly rolled and put away rather than displayed for all to see. Such was the nature of the woman. she habitually put an "X" through her picture whenever it appeared in a newspaper or magazine. Over a long life she was photographed on numerous occasions, but seldom is her face visible for at the last second she would avert her face just before the shutter snapped. She couldn't understand why anyone wanted her face. It was her soul that mattered. She left evidence that she continued to study French until the very end and her only display of pride was the fact that she alone in the community was responsible for the translations from the mother house in France. She was a regular correspondent with a typewriter with traits just as distinguishable as handwriting. Aunt Sue had distinctive typewriting full of hanging letters, funny spaces. She never understood why the machine did not bend to her will.
Now her remains are resting in the garden behind the convent close to the grave of her sister, Elizabeth. There is a hole in the community, the town, the state and indeed even the world. Aunt Sue was dear even to those who knew her by reputation without ever actually meeting her. she was even more dear to those who knew her company. Her long life is a blessing to a multitude of people. Her personality and influence stretched broadly. The small legacy of possessions she left could fit into a medium size box, but her spirit more than filled thousands of hearts.1 
Biography*  From SLB's "Reminiscenses"Tom Piatt of Fayette County named one of his horses "Sister Jane Frances", and we all thought it quite a compliment to both of them.
She was very well educated particularly in the classics. She had a particular love of Shakespeare and commented that every human emotion was contained in his works. She served several turns as mother superior of her convent, but was always a modest unassuming person. During her lifetime she was made a "Kentucky Colonel" by the governor.

(Per Aunt Aileen J. Ryan's notes)     
     Susan Houghton Blakely, another daughter of Laurie & Lillie Blakely, entered the Visitation Order in Georgetown, Kentucky (Cardome) in 1912. As Mother Jane Frances Blakely, she served eight consectuive 3-year terms as superioress of the Convent. She was relieved only last year, at (1979) at her own insistence, at age 94. She is now the stalwart assistant to the present Mother Superior. A woman of outstanding charm, she has engaged the affections of several generations of young ladies and their mothers who were educated at THE place for young ladies of the Blue Grass - CARDOME. Governor Chandler appointed her an honorary Kentucky Colonel. Her influence on the life of central Kentucky has been widespread and profound (See clippings) Her sister, Elizabeth, after several years of social life, followed her into the convent, entering at Wheeling, West Virginia, and eventually coming to Cardome "on Loan" as a teacher of history. She as Mother Agatha also served for a time as Mother Superior. She has predeceased Susie by many years.

(Newspaper article in the Lexington Herald (Kentucky) LIFESTYLE August 5, 1976)
     A CONTINUATION - MOTHER JANE FRANCES BLAKELY KEEPS AN EYE ON MONASTERY
     As an admiring world watched, young women of tiny physical stature set records at the Montreal World Olympics. At Visitation Monastery, Cardome, just outside Georgetown, another tiny lady is quietly setting records.
     Those who have admired Cardome's Mother Janes Frances Blakely for many years are amazed by the stamina and alacrity with which she has begun her unprecendented eighth three-year term as mother superior of the monastery.
     Her gentle spirit, kindness, energy, sharpness and wit remain as strong as ever.
     Small in stature but a giant in mind, Mother Janes Frances has for 65 years seen her beloved Cardome through many triumphs and a share of crises.
     As a young nun, she enjoyed tremendously the role of a teacher of Shakespeare, the classics, as well as Latin and French. Later, the nun held the position of principal of the once flourishing Visitation Academy where as many as 130 girls once were enrolled.
     She patiently endured the years of the demise of the academy, and prayed and worked hard as the nuns changed their work from academy to residence for older ladies and Montessori school.
     Today, with the residence having finally achieved a good measure of success, and with parents seeking extension of the Montessori program into the elementary school level, the veteran superior is marveling once again as more of her prayers come true and as potential nuns seek out the cloister of Cardome.
     Twenty-five years ago Mother Janes Frances' peers would have retired to enjoy the fruits of their labors. But sacrifice of that luxury is one of the demands of religious vocation, and the tiny nun admits that there have been more challenges during the past few years than there were in the earlier ones.
     Cardome's chaplain Father James R. O'Rourke likes to introduce the superior to gatherings by recalling that she bacame a Vistation nun in 1912, "the same year that the Titanic was sunk." He also liked to recall the words of another former chaplain who maintained that he knew at least three times when Mother Jane Frances Blakely "literally saved Cardome."
     As a schoolgirl Susan Houghton Blakely, daughter of Northern Kentucky journalist and St. Xavier journalism school dean, came to know Cardome. A graduate of 1904, she knew the founders of the Visitation in Scott County.
     She saw the present massive monastery when it was under construction, and was deeply impressed by the fact that the chapel was built and completed first.
     After six years of college courses, Susan Blakely made her move to become a nun.
     Her years in the academy saw the school emerge as outstanding, and in the peak years of the 1940's, grow to house 130 students.
     However, the days of the academy of necessity came to an end. Boarding schools all over the country went "out of style" in the 1950's and 1960's. Cardome Visitation Academy graduated its last class in 1969.
     The sisters then turned to the opening of a Montessori pre-school program for local youngsters and the operation of a home for ladies.
     The home grew slowly, but last year achieved near capacity. The Montessori program was so successful it may be enlarged.
     Cardom's time of trial and testing may or may not be over. But with Mother Jane Frances Blakely's guiding presence, Cardom's friends are certain that the new era for visitation Monastery in Scott county will be more productive than ever.


(Newspaper article by Si Cornell)          A SUPERIOR KENTUCKY COLONEL
     Becoming a Kentucky Colonel isn't much news, except-well, read on.
     Cardome Visitation Monastery, about 75 miles down I-75, is a beautiful place atop a hill near Gerogetown, KY.
     The headquarters building once was the mansion of James Robinson, chosen as the confederate governor of Kentucky during the Civil War. It was a rather empty title, Kentucky never seceeding from the Union, and therefore a Confederate governor had few official duties. Still, Kentucky was the only state sporting both Yankee and Rebel governments.
     Nearly 80 years now, Cardome has been operated by nuns of the Visitation Order. Most of that time it was a "finishing school" (high school) for young ladies of fine family. Cardome had students from 15 states and several foreign countries.
     In Recent years, Cardome was converted into a Montessori School for talented younger children. Also, it is a residence for elderly women.
     Boss of all this activity is an unusual woman, Mother Superior Jane Frances. She graduated from Cardome in 1904, and except for the training of her order, never really left.
     I am privileged to know Mother Jane. She is a tiny woman, not much over 80 pounds unless she has a heavy rosary. She never has been known to raise her voice in anger or rebuke, but she has the sort of eyeballs which can glow or freeze.
     Usually, she is both most gentle and most practical. But she does not wish me to tell her age, although that 1904 graduation date might give you a rough idea. For 31 years she was directress and disciplinarian for Cardome's girls, and her eyes and that quiet voice with an edge on it could stop a motorcycle gangfight.
     For 44 years, she has been mother superior. Her order grants only three-year terms at that job, with a limit of two terms in succession. So Mother Jane has served six years at least seven times, meaning there also have been 21 years when she did some other job. That's a lot of work.
     Mother Jane was born Susan Haughton Blakely, a distinguished local name.
     Her father, Laurie J. Blakely, was a journalist, lawyer, and poet. He was editor of the old Cincinnati Commerical Tribune. He founded the School of Journalism at Xavier University and served as its dean.
     Laurie Blakely's labors undoubtedly touched and perhaps transformed many lives. His daughter's have, too.
     Think of all the high school girls down the years changed from gigggles into ladies. Think of the present little children just beginning to examine this world. Think of a lifetime of probelms solved, especially when the problems belonged to others, not Mother Jane.
     Visitation Order now is beginning its 100th year in Kentucky and somebody decided Mother Jane should be a Kentucky Colonel. After all, people so honored are supposed to have done something for the Commonwealth, and Mother Jane certainly qualifies, even if she doesn't bet horses and swizzle juleps.
     A few days back, no less than ex-Gov. A. B. (Happy) Chandler appeard at Cardome to do the honors.
     "Fifty-two years ago, I had a girl friend in school here," said Happy. "The girl insisted I come to Cardome and meet Mother Jane Frances. I did and I have been in live with her ever since."
     Congressman John Breckinridge also sent these words: "Your complete dedication, your personal leadership, and your ideals in the field of education have greatly enriched the state of Kentucky, and have more than earned the tribute paid."
     Mother Jane's niece, Mrs. Jane Blakely Woodrough, of Ft. Mitchell, was present when all these nice things were being said and I asked her what Mother Jane's reply had been.
     "You know how she is," said Mrs. Woodrough. "Whatever it was, it only was a few words and so quiet nobody could hear it."
     Okay, Mother Jane hasn't changed any, but I think the Kentucky Colonels, from this time forward, best mind their manners.


(Newspaper article in TODAY'S FAMILY, Lexington, KY., Tuesday, August 2, 1977)
     FRIENDS HELPING SISTER'S DREAMS COME TRUE     by Ann Blevins
     A lion's share of the thoughts of a Sister of the Visitation belongs to Annecy, a city in southern France where the order of nuns had its beginnings in 1610, and where the Visitation today has its Motherhouse.
     It has been to Annecy that Cardome's Mother Superior Jane Frances Blakely has allowed herself to dream of traveling someday, and it is to that end that Cardome's Alumnae Day gifts to the superior were directed.
     Two special "purses" for the trip to Annecy were presented to the nun of 65 years during Cardome's recent Alumnae Day festivities. One came in a tiny box affixed to a tiny iron, a symbol of Mother Janes Frances' Iron Jubilee, or 65th year, which she is celebrating in 1977. Other gifts for the same purpose were received on the day of the Iron Jubilee Mass. Presentations were made by Mrs. Sinie Stephens Crites of Nicholasville and Mrs. Anna Munday Kingcade of Lexington, the latter representing the Cardome Academy class of 1921.
     Two 60 year graduates were honored at the luncheon. They were Mrs. E. G. Laurie of Lexington and Mrs. Anton Scibilia of Franklin, Ohio. Golden jubilarians who were recognized, but who were not able to present, included Mrs. Jack Downing, Mrs. Howard Meiners and Mrs. Vance Benton of Cincinnati; and Mrs. Kelly Lee of Lexington and Mrs. John Geders of Albuquerque.
     Twenty-five year graduates present were Mrs. Len Welch of Lima, Ohio; Mrs. B. H. Kloss of Marlette, Michigan; Mrs. C. H. Stanfield of Winchester; Mrs. George Harvey of Lexington; and Miss Joan Brielmaier of Cincinnati. Ten year graduates were Miss Jayne Wirtz of Fort Mitchell, and Dr. Adrienne Millett Owen of Lexington.
     Residents of the Cardome, Inc. Residence for Ladies were guests at the luncheon, and were made honorary members of the Cardome Alumnae Association. Among the group was Mrs. Emma Easley, who attended Mount Admirabilis Academy at White Sulphur, which predates the move to Cardome by the Sisters in 1896.
     Mother Jane Frances Blakely, a graduate of 73 years, was recognized at the dinner; as was Mrs. Joe Gaines of Georgetown, a graduate of 64 years. The oldest graduate of Cardome is Mrs. William Graham Kerr of Lexington, a member of the Class of 1900.
     Membership plaque competition tied, with the classes of 1911, 1916, 1917 and 1957 meriting the joint honor. Tying for the attendance plaque were the classes of 1916, 1917 and 1952.
     Sister Jane de Sales is Cardome's director of alumnae affairs. Mrs. Tim Scully is president of the alumnae association.
     


(Newspaper article from THE GRAPHIC, Georgetown, KY., January 29, 1981)
     CARDOME'S SISTER JANE FRANCES BLAKELY ENDS LONG CAREER OF SERVICE
     Cardome Visitation Monastery's Sister Jane Frances Blakely, a 95-year-old figure of masterfulness as comtemplative nun, teacher, academy directress, convent mother superior, Shakespeare authority, and friend of scores of figures from all walks of life, was buried Monday in the monastery graveyard during a funeral mass attended by hundreds of devotees.
     The diminutive and quietly powerful Visitation sister, born Susan Haughton Blakely to Laurie J. and Lilly Lendrum Blakely of Fort Mitchell, had been associated with Cardome since 1901 when she enrolled as a student. Graduated in 1904, she completed college-level studies under the directions of her father, an attorney, political leader, crusading journalist, teacher, and dean of the School of Journalism of St. Xavier University. She entered the monastery in 1910 and made her religious profession May 8, 1912.
     Sister Jane Frances' life bridged two distinct eras both in politics and religious service. Her father was a Confederate soldier known as "every inch a gentleman, Southerner and Catholic." An opponent of the Goebel faction in Covington politics, he served in the Kentucky legislature and was eulogized at his death as "an old-fashioned journalist who loved the poor, the oppressed, the afflicted, caring nothing for personal advantage, fighting their battles without flinching. . ." He looked like Mark Twain, with whom he corresponded, and once wrote the great author that he shaved while looking at Twain's picture.
     The timing of her coming to Cardome coincided with the later years of the nuns who had established the Visitation community in Scott County in 1875 and who had made the move from White Sulphur to the home of the late Governor James F. Robinson in 1896. She also personally knew all living graduates of Cardome Visitation Academy, a girls' academy which in the mid-twentieth century became one of the leading boarding schools of the South. By 1930 Cardome was educating young women from 20 states, and by 1943 enrollment had peaked at 130.
     Sister Jane Frances all her life was devoted to Christian education, as was her brother, the Rev. Paul L. Blakely, S.J., an editor of "America" from 1914 until his death in 1943. His columns of national and international affairs were influential in formulating catholic public opinion. Her sister, Elizabeth Ashton, became Sister Agatha, who like Sister Jane Frances was authoritative in the English classics and who in 1937 became Cardome's mistress of novices.
     Sister Janes Frances' teaching expertise brought her fame as an instructor in the works of Shakespeare. She was also teacher of drama.
     Her succession of terms of service as convent superior began in 1940. Because she was principal of the academy, she saw herelf as a "non-candidate" for the superior office. When word came of her election, students pleaded with her not to leave them, so she took on double duty, doing both jobs so well that time and again she was called on to be mother superior. In 1976 she was elected to an unprecendented eighth term.
     Although Sister Jane Frances' roles in Cardome's active apostolates made her a legend, her work as mother superior and as a contemplative nun whose main vocation is that of prayer were the real marks of Sister Janes Frances Blakely, She led the convent through crisis after crisis in a calm, resolute and undaunted manner which brought her the admiration of bishop after bishop.
     Her friends were many and varied, representing many religious persuasions. Among them was former Governor A. B. "Happy" Chandler who once recalled how he met Sister Jane Frances. "I had a girl friend in school here," he said. "She insisted I come to Cardome and meet Mother Jane Frances. I did and I have been in love with her ever since." Other admirers included the Late Colonel Harland Sanders of Kentucky Fried Chicken fame and Congressman John Breckinridge.
     The diversity of her influence was somewhat exemplified by the four-year-old Montessori student who paid Sister a daily visit and who participated in the offertory at her funeral mass.
     Doing the honors at her funeral mass was the bhispop of the Diocese of Covington, the Most Rev. William A. Hughes, chief celebrant, who was joined by the retired bishop, the Most Rev. Richard H.. Ackerman, who preached the sermon. Others concelebrating were monsignor Leonard Nienaber, Cardome chaplain; the Rev. James R. O'Rourke, pastor of St. John and St. Francis parishes of Scott County; and Monsignor Charles Murphy of Cincinnati.
     Bishop Ackerman discussed Sister Jane Frances as he had come to know her over the past 20 years. "She was a woman who loved God very much," he said. "She left no wordly goods, but oh what a legacy she left to us all. She left behind an example of tremendous worth."
     While she was drawn to the Visitation Order because of its strict cloister and the "mountaintop top it offered to her to seek the hidden life in Christ." She also was drawn to it because of her own intellectuality and her desire to be involved in Christian education. "She entered the Visitation at a time when it was recognized as one of the great teaching commmunities of the church," he noted.
     Further, said the bishop, "Sister Jane Frances understood her vocation to become a saint. She fulfilled the statement of St. Francis de Sales, founder of the Visitiation, that "the measure of love is to love without measure."
     "A gentle lady, knowledgable, well disciplined, and genteel," Sister Jane Frances, he said, "will be in the everlasting hills of God as true a friend and as true a mother as she ever was."
     Bearers were John Haggin Cooper, E. Durward Weldon, Edward H. Lynch, R. Hall Wolfe, Walter Harper and Malcolm B. Saunier.
     Friends are planning to establish a memorial endowment fund for Cardome's sisters. Contributons may be sent to Sister Jane de Sales.

     


(Newspaper article)          FUND TO HONOR MOTHER JANE FRANCES     by Ann Bevins
     A memorial has been established in the name of Mother Jane Francis Blakely of the Sisters of the Visitation of Cardome at Georgetown which will perpetuate her two loves-the religious life, and education.
     The Mother Jane Frances Blakely Fund, which has been instituted by friends of the recently deceased legendary figure who spent 70 of her 95 years in the Visitation order and 24 of them as mother superior, will be invested and called upon for use in educating young nuns. "Young," in the words of a benefactor involved in setting up the memorial, "Means anyone the age of or younger than Mother Jane Frances."
     Since her death of January 22 and burial on January 26 following funeral Mass celebrated by Bishop William A. Hughes and retired Bishop Richard H. Ackerman, persons from all parts of the country have been writing to Cardome in an attempt to verbalize their feelings about the life and death of Mother Jane Frances.
     Most of the expressions of sympathy have echoed Bishop Ackerman's homily comment that "she will be in the everlasting hills of God as true a friend and as true a mother as she ever was.
     Her own community of sisters, in the official obituary letter to other Visitation communities, concluded by saying "There is a Christian way of life and an American way of life which are inseparable; there is a spiritual life and a cultural life which are united; there is a private life and a public life which are complementary. All of these inseparable ways formed the composite early life of Sister Jane Frances, and we believe, even as we pray for the repose of her soul, that they have culminated in a wonderfully glorious eternal life for her."
     Contributions may be made payable to the "Mother Jane Frances Blakely Fund" and sent to the Sisters of the Visitation, Cardome, Georgetown, Kentucky 40324.
     

Prayer Card - From death to life through Christ. (Burial Service)
V. J.
In Loving Memory of
Sister Jane Frances Blakely
Born May 23, 1885
Professed May 8, 1912
Died January 22, 1981
Buried January 26, 1981
at Cardome

Please remember her in your prayers. 
Employment*circa 1910 She was a nun circa 1910 at 'Cardome', Georgetown, KY
CONVENT*8 May 1912 She was 'Cardome' on 8 May 1912 at Georgetown, KY
Last Edited7 Sep 2009

Citations

  1. [S8] Family information.
  2. [S17] SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.
  3. [S35] Lendrum Blakely.

Susanna M. Blakely

F, #55, b. 23 February 1837, d. 17 May 1901
Father*James B. Blakely b. 15 Jun 1804, d. 19 Jun 1882
Mother*Susananna Smyth b. 15 Sep 1804, d. 12 Nov 1885
Relationships2nd great-grandaunt of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
2nd great-grandaunt of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Burial* Susanna M. Blakely was buried at St. Mary's, Elk County, PA, She was buried in the Wimmer plot.
Sue X. Blakely
Birth*23 February 1837 She was born on 23 February 1837 at Pittsburgh, PA.1,2 
 She was the daughter of James B. Blakely and Susananna Smyth
Baptism5 March 1837 She was baptized on 5 March 1837 at Roman Catholic; St. Patrick/St. Paul, Pittsburgh, PA, Sponsors were Laurence Mitchell and Ophelia Zimonds.2 
Death*17 May 1901  On 17 May 1901
Obituary of Miss Sue X. Blakely
May 23, 1901
St. Marys, Elk Co, Penna

DIED AT ST. VINCENT’S HOSPITAL

On Friday last, May 17, at St. Vincent’s hospital, Erie, Miss Sue X. Blakely, of this place, departed from earthly scenes. We cannot be satisfied with the mere announcement of the death of one so well known, so highly esteemed and so truly loved, not alone by her immediate family but by all who knew her, but the
testimonial of respect and the expression of regret are alike inadequate to portray the sorrow caused by her demise.

Miss Blakely was born in Pittsburgh, Pa. Where her parents resided for many years. She was educated at the Visitation academy, of Mt. DeChantal, Wheeling, West Virginia where she showed herself an exceptionally bright pupil, talented and studious. On being graduated from that institution she carried off the highest honors of her class.

Faithful in her friendship, she kept up a correspondence with many of her old schoolmates who will miss her bright letters, while they deeply mourn the passing away of her amiable personality.

Miss Blakely came with her parents, to who she was a devoted daughter, to St. Mary’s in the early sixties and has resided here ever since, with occasional visits elsewhere. After her parents’ death she made her home with her sister, Mrs. Sebastian Wimmer. Some months ago she was stricken with incipient paralysis, the result it is supposed of a fall. Every attention that love could suggest was hers and her physician’s skill and care was unremitting; but she grew no better and the idea that special treatment in a hospital would benefit her, took possession of her mind and in pursuance of this feeling she was taken to St. Vincent hospital in Erie. She stood the journey remarkably well and for a few days seemed to improve although no hope was entertained of ultimate recovery. Her sister in law, Mrs. Mary G. Blakely, of Erie, was with her night and day and the good sisters were devoted in their care. Her brother, Very Reverend Aloysius M. Blakely, Vicar General of Nicopolis, Bulgaria, now on a visit to his native land, her sister, Mrs. Mary Louise Ryan, of Cincinnati, and her devoted nephew, Eugene Blakely, eldest son of her brother, the late Dr. Blakely, of Erie, were with her for some days before she died.
Her remains were brought to St. Mary’s and on Saturday and Sunday were viewed by sorrowing friends at the home of her brother-in-law, Hon. Sebastian Wimmer, of this place. The funeral rites were performed by her brother, Father Aloysius, with requiem mass at the German church, in accordance with her oft-expressed wish, her beloved parents having been buried from that church, the last rites over both of whom had also been held by Father Aloysius.
Her nephew, Ernest, J. Wimmer, late District Attorney of Elk County, was also buried from St. Mary’s Church. She was laid to rest in St. Marys Cemetery in the presence of her mourning relatives and many friends, who had followed her weeping and praying to the tomb. Miss Blakely’s talents were of an unusually high order. She was a fine linguist, as her translations from the different languages attest, and her stories and poems in the different magazines gained the admiration of all who read them. Her pen was devoted to the service of religion, and her refined tastes and elevation of soul made her look
with abhorrence on unmeritorious publications of the day. Miss Blakely was a fervent Catholic, and might be called a pioneer member of the Sacred Heart church at this place. Loving the beauty of the house of the Lord, she took delight in caring for the altar and in beautifying His sanctuary.
Many and fervent will be the prayers offered up that she may soon behold the Beatific vision for Whose sight she longed, and that her soul may rest in peace, the peace which passeth understanding. 
Probate*26 August 1904 Her estate was probated on 26 August 1904 at St. Mary's, PA, Will Book B p.219. 
Biography*  There is a small red book in possession of Margot Woodrough 1998 (sent to Historical Society in 2003) that was authored by Sue X. Blakely.
In a book called Early Phases of St. Mary's Co, PA Sue X Blakely is referred to as belonging to a "pioneer family". She was an outstanding student who for some reason never married, but chose instead to accompany her parents when they moved from Pittsburgh at the time of their bankruptcy. She and her parents lived in St. Marys, Elk County, PA. When her parents, James and Susan, died she moved in with her sister (Lavinia Blakely Wimmer). A detailed account of her life and death is found in the Sebastian Wimmer diaries.
 
Name Variation  Susanna M. Blakely was also known as Sue Xavier Blakely I think she took the name Xavier as an adult. 
CENSUS1880*1 June 1880  Occupation shown as merchant.3 
Last Edited28 Apr 2006

Citations

  1. [S52] 1850 Census;.
  2. [S38] Baptismal Entry St. Paul, Diocese of Pittsburgh
    Synod Hall
    125 N. Craig Street
    Pittsburgh, PA 15213
    412-621-6217 Fax 412-621-6237.
  3. [S56] 1880 Census;, T9-1125 p. 429A.

Virginia Rose Blakely

F, #728, b. 3 March 1852, d. 6 December 1856
Father*James B. Blakely b. 15 Jun 1804, d. 19 Jun 1882
Mother*Susananna Smyth b. 15 Sep 1804, d. 12 Nov 1885
Relationships2nd great-grandaunt of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
2nd great-grandaunt of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*3 March 1852 Virginia Rose Blakely was born on 3 March 1852 at Pittsburgh, PA.1 
 She was the daughter of James B. Blakely and Susananna Smyth
Baptism7 March 1852 She was baptized on 7 March 1852 at Roman Catholic; St. Patrick/St. Paul, Pittsburgh, PA, Sponsors Georgio H. Keyser and Maria Toner.1 
Death*6 December 1856 She died on 6 December 1856 at Collins Township, Allegheny County, PA, at age 4 According to the records of St. Mary's Cemetery in Lawrenceville Pittsburgh, PA. She was buried on Dec. 6 1856. She died of croup. Address for St. Mary's is 718 Hazelwood Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15217-2807. Three other children died in years 1852 to 1861, but I've not entered them as I've not found any record of their birth yet. They are : Alice M., Mary E. and Joseph. (7-2000). 
Last Edited16 Apr 2006

Citations

  1. [S38] Baptismal Entry St. Paul, Diocese of Pittsburgh
    Synod Hall
    125 N. Craig Street
    Pittsburgh, PA 15213
    412-621-6217 Fax 412-621-6237.

Walter James Blakely

M, #187, b. 18 November 1843, d. 7 October 1912
JOHN SIMPSON BLAKELY
WALTHER J. BLAKELY (SON)
WALTER J. BLAKELY
Father*John Simpson Blakely b. c 1812, d. 12 Feb 1877
Mother*Jemima Cecelia Fortune b. 1809, d. 24 Aug 1898
Relationships1st cousin 4 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
1st cousin 4 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsBLAKELY
MARRIAGE* Walter James Blakely married Mary J. (?) The 1880 census for St. Louis shows Mary J. Blakely wife age 43. The family lives with Walter's mother and aunt, a brother and a cousin. No children.1 
Birth*18 November 1843 He was born on 18 November 1843.2 
 He was the son of John Simpson Blakely and Jemima Cecelia Fortune
MARRIAGE2*after 1881  I suspect that she is wife #2 as she is the person mentioned in family records as being his wife. Only known child was not born until 1884. I am correct as she appears on the 1900 census with her family. 
Death*7 October 1912  Obituary reads:
The funeral of Walter J. Blakely, who died suddenly Monday at his home, 4467 Berlin Avenue after being stricken with apoplexy in the offices of the Lciede Gas Light Company, where he had been employed for three years took place at 6 o'clock yesterday morning from New Cathedral Chapel. Burial was in Calvary Cemetery.
Mr. Blakely moved to St. Louis in 1863 from Ohio, whee he was born November 18, 1843. He took an active part in literary and dramatic circles in St. Louis, and was regarded as a Shakespearean student. He was for a number of years president ot the St. Louis Gymnasium and the Audubon society. He was also one of the organizers of the McCullagh Dramatic Club. He was educated at St. Vincent's Benedictine College in Pennsylvania. He was presiden of the St. Louis Sanitary Company until absorbed by the city. He was an alumnus of St. Louis University. He is survived by two sisters, Misses Mary I.and Frances M. Blakely, and one daughter Miss Imogene Blakely; Information taken from newspaper clipping.2
WALTER J. BLAKELY OBITUARY
Burial*10 October 1912 He was buried on 10 October 1912 at Calvery Cemetery, St. Louis, MO, Funeral at New Cathedral Chapel.3,4
 
Biography* 
Here is the caption beneath his picture found in a newspaper clipping in scrapbook at Beechwood:
"Walter J. Blakely is a splendid specimen of physical manhood - fully 6 feet in height, borad-shouldered, big-muscled, and about two hundred pounds in weight. He is just the man for president of the Missouri Gymnasium, in which office he has made a host of friends. He wears a jet-black mustache and imperial (apparently an imperial was a goatee), and they are matched by a pair of laughing black eyes and a suit of black hair. He dresses well, but a trifle carelessly, and is always ready to enjoy a joke or tell a story, except you catch him with the cares of the Excelsior Vinegar and Pickle company resting on him, and then jokes don't go. He has the good sense to leave his business cares at his office, however.
 
Name Variation  Walter James Blakely was also known as Jim. 
CENSUS1870*1870  1870 MO, St. Louis Co., Ward 5, 73rd Subdivision
> Page 6
> BLAKELY
> John S., 56, retired merchant/$5000, ENG
> Jemima, 56, keeps house, ENG
> Mary, 32, ENG
> Frances, 19, teacher, OH
> James, 25, bookkeeper, OH
> FORTUNE
> Mary, 54, PA.5
 
CENSUS1880*1880 He appeared on the Census in 1880 at St. Louis, MO.6 
Anecdote*1896  In 1896
East Liverpool Revisited
May 1896
To ‘The boys”


No more than five and thirty years
Have passed since you and I
The river swam, the forest trod.
As happy hours went by,
It seems a space so small that when
I look into the past,
I hear and see each boy and girl
With whom my lot was cast.

Their children, now, with hands and
Brain
The wheels of commerce turn,
Or hold the helm of State, or raise
The monumental urn
In memory of the patriarchs
Whose word those days was law;
But who, ere death, with wondering
Eyes,
Transformed the village saw.

There still remain, in majesty,
The old Virginia hills,
Whose lofty tops, with verdure clad,
Despite of human ills,
Ambition’s call and death’s decree,
And need of commerce’ space,
Are yet reflected in the stream
Whose waters wash their base.

But not alone the river and
The mountains have I found
Unchanged, for, ah! The hearts of all
The “boys” who gather round
And press my hands and call my
Name
Are youthful, still, and true.
There is no change among ‘the boys;”
The town alone, is new.

This poem written by Walter J. Blakely on a train while riding between this city and Stuebenville in May
1896 while on his return trip to his home in St. Louis after spending a week with local friends in this city
having been away for some odd thirty years, shows what a love for his old home town he had and of the
feeling that went through his veins when he was permitted the pleasure of talking and being with his old
“school boy and girlfriends once again.

Walter J. Blakely, aged 51 years, a pioneer East Liverpool potter, poet, dramatic artist and composer, died
Monday evening at his home in St. Louis, Mo. The telegram received in this city yesterday gave no details
of the cause of the death.

Mr. Blakely was the son of John S. Blakely of the old renowned manufacturing pottery firm of Woodward
and Blakely whose plant occupied the cite where the Hall China company now stands and which has been
recently sold to the Board of Education for the new High School building.

The elder Blakelys were English people and come to this country in the early 40’s and settled in Pittsburgh
afterwards removing to this city.

Mr. Blakely’s father was appointed postmaster of this city for a series of years under the presidency of
Buchanan. Mr. Blakely gave the piece of property where the engine room of the Vodrey pottery now
stands to the Catholic people of this city for the site upon which they might build their church.

The Blakelys retired from the potting business about 1861 and removed to St. Louis where they have made
their home since.

Walter J. was a poet of considerable merit and likewise possessed great dramatic talent. He and his father
and sister and Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Woodward and the late Thomas Thackeray were members of the Old
Home Players Dramatic club. This club built the old town hall afterwards called the Bradshaw Hall which
until recently was used as an edifice occupied by the Christian church for worship. It is located on
Broadway.

This hall was erected specially for the purpose of giving entertainments of home talent which embraced a
number of Shakespeare’s greatest plays and the very best of the comedies known to every lover of
Shakespeare’s works.

Walter J. was a young man of 16 or 17 when he left this city and went to St Louis. Thirty years afterwards
he dropped into town – that was three and a half years ago. As he alighted from the train at the station he
immediately asked for John N. Taylor, B.C. Simms, H.L. Simms, Jacob Shenkle and other school boy
companions, many of whom were dead. He spent an entire week as a guest of his many friends. He has
returned several times since on which occasions he has given recitations at the meetings of the Baedecker
Club and on one occasion he made a speech and gave several of his famous selections at the Masonic Hall.

He was a very devout Catholic and was a member of the St. Aloysius Church from early boyhood until the
time of leaving the city.

It was his greatest pleasure to call on Mrs. Patrick McNicol and others of the oldest members of the St.
Aloysius church, whom he could find that were living, and those who were dead – he would hunt up their
children and their grandchildren.

The latchstring was out to Mr. Blakely in hundreds of local homes in the city, both of Protestant and
Catholic.

He was made an honorary member of the United States Potters Association because of his connection with
pioneer pottery in East Liverpool

The news of his death came to the city in a telegram to H.L. Simms, at whose home he always made his
headquarters when visiting in the city. The telegram was from his daughter and contained an
announcement of his death with no particulars. 
Employment*circa 1900 He was employed circa 1900 at Manufacturer; Excelsior Vinegar and Pickle Co. 
Residence*1912 He lived in 1912 at St. Louis, MO; Address taken from obituary. 

Family 1

Mary J. (?) b. 1837, d. June 1881
MARRIAGE* He married Mary J. (?) The 1880 census for St. Louis shows Mary J. Blakely wife age 43. The family lives with Walter's mother and aunt, a brother and a cousin. No children.1 

Family 2

Nannie Hawes b. 22 February 1853, d. 9 May 1903
MARRIAGE2*after 1881  I suspect that she is wife #2 as she is the person mentioned in family records as being his wife. Only known child was not born until 1884. I am correct as she appears on the 1900 census with her family. 
Child
Last Edited18 Feb 2006

Citations

  1. [S56] 1880 Census;.
  2. [S17] SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.
  3. [S36] Clippings, various dates.
  4. [S511] St. Louis Cem., #150501 CALVARY.
  5. [S55] 1870 Census;.
  6. [S56] 1880 Census;, T9-0733 p. 226C.

William Blakely

M, #184, b. circa 1806, d. 8 August 1879
WILLIAM BLAKELY
Father*(?) Blakely b. c 1785, d. b 1830
Mother*Sarah or Alice (?) b. 1781, d. 8 Jul 1854
Relationships3rd great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
3rd great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsBLAKELY
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
ReferenceA-5
Birth*circa 1806 William Blakely was born circa 1806 at England.1 
 He was the son of (?) Blakely and Sarah or Alice (?)
Burial*August 1879 He was buried in August 1879 Buried at St. Philip Neri cemetery Dungannon, Ohio which was the closest Catholic burial ground to the infirmary.2 
Death*8 August 1879 He died on 8 August 1879. 
Biography*  It is possible he moved to Canada (MVW 1999). I found a William Blakely in Canada in 1871 census. (See file for copy - 1998) The person on the Canadian census is the correct age and gives his heritage as English, but states that he was born in the U.S. LWG speculates that perhaps he said that since he was only eleven years old when he came to the U.S. 
Biography  Very little is known about William Blakely. We have only one public record of William, which is his application for naturalization, filed in 1830 in the District Court of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. It states:

     Blakely, William (1830); born in England; sailed from Liverpool and arrived in Philadelphia; 13 years, now age 24 years (1830). Sponsor: James Blakely, of Pittsburgh.

We can calculate the year of his birth by his stated age of 24 on a document dated 1830, thus we know William Blakely was born in 1806.

In their applications for naturalization, the brothers James and William seem to disagree on their port of entry to America. James said Baltimore; William said Philadelphia. There are very few printed lists of passengers arriving in America prior to 1820, since such lists were not required to be made or kept. Accordingly the correct port cannot been determined.

In the 1830 census of Bayardstown, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania there are two children living in the household of Sarah Blakely; a daughter, age 15-20 and a son over 20, under 30. It is therefore presumed that William was still living with his mother and sister when he applied for naturalization.

Another reference to William Blakely was recently discovered. His brother, James Blakely, became a victim of the panic of 1857 and was forced "assign", or file bankruptcy. The name William Blakely is recorded a couple of times in the papers filed with the bankruptcy court. William is named as owing James a due bill in the amount of $150.00, dated Nov. 30, 1849. Thus William may have been living and working either in the Pittsburgh area or possibly in East Liverpool, Ohio with his younger brother, John Simpson Blakely. He lived close enough to borrow $150.00 from his brother, which was a lot of money in 1857 terms. The record indicates a payment of 1¢, leaving a balance owed of $149.99. Nothing further is noted.

There is no baptismal record for William in the Diocese of Pittsburgh; nor is there a record of a marriage there. The search for more information on William Blakely continues. (Note, since this was written a letter from the East Liverpool Historical Society provided more information about William).3
 
Living*1849 He was living in 1849; He was living in 1849 because on Nov. 30 he signed a note for $150.00 to his brother James. In 1857 when his brother went bankrupt the note was classified as "doubtful". 
Occupation*before 1852 He was He was a contractor in building canals and railways undertaking public projects in Lynchburg, Virginia and Morgantown West Virginia. before 1852.2 
Occupation1853 He was He joined his brother at Woodward and Blakely pottery and became an expert "splattler" using a large brush to throw dark slip glaze on a piec of yellow biscuit ware. in 1853 at East Liverpool, Columbiana County, OH.2 
Residence*27 September 1858 He lived on 27 September 1858 at Lisbon, OH; He was disabled and without a job so went to live in the poorhouse.2,4 
Biography2000  The following is an article written by Glenn Waight for the June, 2000 issue of Hills & Kilns, a newsletter published by the E. Liverpool Historical Society:
"An Old-Timer"
Most of us are familiar with the difficulties that troubled the pottery industry in the late 20th century. Less known are those that plagued the pioneers who built and worked at East Liverpool's early kilns and shops. One of the notable figures who fell on hard times was William Blakely, brother of James and John S. Blakely, who were involved in development of this town along the river. A June 1895 article in the "Crockery & Glass Journal" described "Billy" Blakely (then spelled Bleakley) who was born around 1800 at Liverpool, England, of a respected family. Titled "One of the Old-Timers", it was probably written by Jere H. Simms, editor and publisher of the local Tribune, a correspondent for the magazine at the time. "Billy" was a pal of artist David Blythe who later earned fame in American art circles. Blythe penned sketch of him that became a part of the collection of works by the local painter.

The two were close chums, although Billy was a bitter Democrat and Blythe an Abolitionist-Whig. Across his sketch of Billy he wrote "A Free Trade Man", signing it Boots, his non-de-plume. The drawing was found in the papers of the late Dr. B. B. Ogden and became the possession of his son, Dr. Charles B. Ogden.
Prior to 1852 Billy was a contractor in building canals and railways. He had considerable means, and undertook large public projects at Lynchburgh, Va. and later Morgantown, W. Va. But in the panic of 1837, he was left holding many worthless bonds and notes taken in payment for his work.
After his brother joined in forming the Woodward & Blakely pottery in 1847, Billy occasionally visited here. With his fiscal crisis, Billy came here in 1852 and took up potting at Woodward. He became an expert "splatter", using a large hair brush to throw dark slip glaze onto a piece of yellow biscuit ware to produce a mottled appearance on a teapot or pitcher. He also did other jobs, according to William H. Vodrey, later of the Vodrey pottery, who worked with him for five years. He said Billy would push a wheelbarrow or do labor if needed, able to learn quickly from watching others.

He had suffered a leg injury from falling bricks after coming to East Liverpool, and had to use a cane in walking. He was partial to snuff-colored clothing, and in his last days in the city wore a tattered yellow coat. Billy could also sing and act, often rendering "The Man With the Cork Leg" to the amusement of onlookers. Billy worked steadily until 1857 when Woodward & Blakely went out of business in the panic. The article noted he was a "gentleman by birth and heritage, of considerable culture and education, a kind-hearted, jolly, companionable fellow."

After the pottery failure, brother John and his family moved to St. Louis. Billy was set up in business as a coller with a new outfit, but he didn't obtain sufficient work, possibly because of the hard times. Without other employment available at his age or anyone to care for him, he went into the county poorhouse at Lisbon Sept. 27, 1858, probably at his own request, since he did not wish to take the charity of personal friends.
He generally spent winters at the county home, returning here during the summer when he would serve as a hostler at the old Ohio House, a tavern of William Devers. In earlier days he had boarded at the hotel/tavern, paying for the best room and regarded as a respected Englishman. The reporter noted that so long as Mrs. Devers lived, old Billy would always have a place for a good meal, although he wanted to work for it.
After almost 21 years at the poorhouse, he died August 8, 1879, and was buried in the St. Phillip Neri parish cemetery at Dungannon - the nearest Catholic burial ground to the infirmary.
The article concluded: "Billy Bleakley was one of those who did their part to get a foothold for ceramics in this country, and had his full share of the suffering and privation that marked the pathway of the pioneer potters."2 
Last Edited4 Jul 2011

Citations

  1. [S13] Allegheny County Immigrants.
  2. [S541] "East Liverpool H. S."
  3. [S563] Laura Steneck, "Laura Steneck," e-mail to Margot Woodrough.
  4. [S54] 1860 Census;, He is shown living at the poorhouse.

William Blakely

M, #726, b. 23 August 1828, d. 23 August 1828
Father*James B. Blakely b. 15 Jun 1804, d. 19 Jun 1882
Mother*Susananna Smyth b. 15 Sep 1804, d. 12 Nov 1885
Relationships2nd great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
2nd great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Death*23 August 1828 William Blakely died on 23 August 1828 at Pittsburgh, PA
Baptism23 August 1828 He was baptized on 23 August 1828 at Roman Catholic; St. Patrick/St. Paul, Pittsburgh, PA, Sponsors were Johanna and Alice Blakely. 
Birth*23 August 1828 He was born on 23 August 1828 at Pittsburgh, PA.1 
 He was the son of James B. Blakely and Susananna Smyth
Last Edited16 Apr 2006

Citations

  1. [S38] Baptismal Entry St. Paul, Diocese of Pittsburgh
    Synod Hall
    125 N. Craig Street
    Pittsburgh, PA 15213
    412-621-6217 Fax 412-621-6237.

William James Blakely

M, #56, b. 26 April 1839, d. 7 January 1877
Father*James B. Blakely b. 15 Jun 1804, d. 19 Jun 1882
Mother*Susananna Smyth b. 15 Sep 1804, d. 12 Nov 1885
Relationships2nd great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
2nd great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*26 April 1839 William James Blakely was born on 26 April 1839 at Pittsburgh, PA, This is the second William in family. Earlier birth Aug 23 1828 must have died young.1,2 
 He was the son of James B. Blakely and Susananna Smyth
Baptism5 May 1839 He was baptized on 5 May 1839 at Roman Catholic; St. Patrick/St. Paul, Pittsburgh, PA, Sponsors listed as Johanna and Alice Blakely. (Not sure which Alice and do not know who is Johanna (John Simpson?). 
MARRIAGE10 May 1864  Marriage record from St. Mary's Church states: " William James Blakely, son of James Blakely and Susan Smyth from Pittsburg, and Josephine Luhr, daughter of Joseph Luhr and Barbara Loesch from Forshheim, Baden (Germany), married in St. Mary's Church on May 10, 1864. Witnesses were Laurie Blakely, James B. Dodge, Susan Blakely, and Mary English. Minister was Father Ferdinand B. Wolf, of the Order of St. Benedict."
Josephine died in March of the following year in childbirth. William remarried and apparently named his first daughter Josephine after his first wife. (Probably first and second wives were friends or possibly could have been sisters). Laura Glass does not think they were sisters as Wimmer mentions going to the "Gensheimer store" while in Erie in 1871. She thinks that he met Mary in Erie since that is where he set up his practice, probably leaving St. Marys shortly after the death of his wife Josephine. 
MARRIAGE*25 August 1870 He married Mary Gensheimer on 25 August 1870 at Erie, PA, Need to check these witnesses. I believe they go with Marriage #1 not this marriage #2. 
Death*7 January 1877 He died on 7 January 1877 at Died Young, Erie, PA, at age 37 He died at an early age from pneumonia contracted from a patient. (Taken from SLB Diary) Saturday, Dec. 30th 1876
This morning at 9 o'clock found so much snow drifted about house entry and all around fence high, that we were all kept busy till 3 p.m. to shovel the tracks clear. Last night and during day high wind, drifting snow in all directions. Mail West passed at 6 p.m. instead of 1.46 p.m. Mail East had not left Erie at 5 p.m. owing to snow drifts. Called at Blakely's and Luhr's store during afternoon and evening. This morning Dr. Wm. J. Blakely contracted his cold at Erie from which he died 8 days afterwards. (Taken from Sebastian Wimmer's Diary).3,4 
Obituary13 January 1877 Obnituary of William James Blakely was Lake Shore Visitor, Jan. 13, 1877 W.JAMES BLAKELY, M.D.".................After a very short but severe illness, surrounded by his family, --that true wife so worthy in every way of such a husband, -those THREE lovely children just able to lisp a prayer for their dying father,-that aged mother who had taught him how to live, now come to teach him how to die,-that reverand brother................."

(Newspaper article) From Kay Ryan          DUST TO DUST
     On Thursday last the mortal remains for Dr. W. James Blakely were interred in Trinity Cemetery. At ten o'clock, after the office for the dead was recited at the house, the funeral cortege moved to St. Patrick's pro-Cathedral, where a large concourse of people, of all denominations, had already assembled to witness the impressive ceremonies. The day was unusually stormy, otherwise the church could not have held all who would have attended. But in spite of the falling snow and driving winds the attendance was very large, attesting the very high estimation in which the deceased was held in this community. The Young Men's Catholic Lyceum attended in a body, with their badges, and the pall-bearers with the casket, followed by the mourners, passed between their open ranks, to the altar railing. A solemn requiem Mass was sung by Father Aloysius, younger brother of the deceased, assisted by Rev. James A. McCabe, of St. Andrew's, as deacon and Rev. E. J. Murphy, of St. Patrick's, as sub-deacon; Rev. Thos. A. Casey, rector of the Cathedral, and Rev. M. J. Decker, of St. John's were also in the sanctuary. The Rt. Rev. Bishop was unavoidably absent from the city. The Mass was, of course, in the solemn Gregorian chant, appropriate to such occasions; and both on the part of the celebrant and the choir, under the leadership of Mrs. Bohen, who also presided at the organ, it was rendered in a manner that must have moved the hearts of all who heard it. The voice and manner of Father Aloysius were peculiarly touching and impressive. While the Dominus vobisum showed an intonation tremulous with human sorrow, in all the rest of the mass it was the priest, not the brother, who was seen and heard, till in the last Requiescal in pace! the human heart of the brother again contended for the mastery, and the impassioned wail of sorrow and supplication, not unmingled with the gladness of a hope, went to every heart; and suffused many an eye with tears.
     Then when the asat solemn services were chanted over the coffin, and a few prayers were recited in English, with responses by the congregation, Father Casey ascended the pulpit, and delivered a most beautiful eulogy on the life and character of the deceased. The reverend orator spoke from the heart and every word that fell from his eloquent lips was listened to with rapt attention by the entire assemblage. Many a tear was caused to well afresh, by his touching allusions to the merits and virtues of the deceased and the sympathy that is felt for his bereaved family and friends. We have not space for the sermon entire, but make room for the following synopsis: "Well done thou good and faithful servant. Since thou hast been faithful over few things I will place thou ever many. Enter thou into the joy of the Lord."
     We are assembled here to-day, kind friends to pay the last sad tribute to the memory of one, who was well known and highly respected in this community. Persons of all classes are. The non-Catholic is present, because in the person of the deceased during life, he recognized all those qualities of heart and of mind, that united make the gentleman of sterling worth. By all such he was known as a member of his profession, gifted with an ability more than ordinary, possessed of an honor and an integrity far beyond reproach. They mayhap had frequently met him in the performance of his professional duties, and had learned to regard him as a physician most anxious to advance the interests of the school to which he beonged, and ever ready and willing to assist his fellow man no matter of what creed or color; hence throwing all religious felling aside they manifest by their presence to-day, that the deceased, although a devoted Catholic, had won for himself many true and warm-hearted friends amongst those who are strangers to his cherished faith.
     The Catholic and particularly members of this congreation are here to perform a most sacred duty. They are here for a higher, holier purpose. They have been taught that all ends not with death, that no matter how well the life may have been led, there perhaps may have been some fault unatoned for, since they know that God in His all-wise judgment is scrupulously just and exacting; hence they are here for the purpose of uniting with the Priest at the altar in asking God to forgive whatever may have been amiss in the life of the deceased. The members of this congregation knew the deceased to have been a pious, a devout Catholic. Frequently had they witnessed him set the very edifying example of approaching the Holy Table and reverently receiving the precious body and blood of Him by whose death his immortal soul was ransomed. Generally every Saturday morning the Doctor received Holy Communion, and on Friday evenings he presented himself, for the reception of that other sacrament, at the sacred tribunal of penance, where man by his humility and obedience rises as it were far above his common nature, believing as his faith taught him that penance is the only reparation that can be made for any fault, however slight. Many of you who are accustomed to assist on week days at Mass know very well that I am but speaking the truth, when I say, that generally at the 6 or 7 o'clock Mass on week mornings the deceased was present. But this is not all; he was one who not only practiced his religion, but understood it well, and as well knew how to defend it. Were any of its principles attacked, any of its sacred institutions slandered, the hand that is now stilled in death was ready and willing to use the pen in their defense, and the tongue that is now hushed in the keep silence of the grave, often uttered words that bore with them conviction, because they proceeded from a heart sincerely honest. In a literary point of view the deceased was a man of no mean ability. Of a studious turn of mind, he kept himself well posted not only on new developments that might be made in the science of medicine, but on all topics of interest, whether civil or religious. His highest ambition apeared to have been to diffuse around him as far as he could that knowledge which he himself possessed, and hence we find him interested in associations of a literary character, and to-day one of these societies, the Young Men's Catholic Lyceum, have turned out in a body to do honor to him whom a few days ago they unanimously chose to be their President. To these young gentlemen of the Lyceum I would say, that your selection was a good one. As a member of your society he was an honor. As its president or its leader he was an oruament and invalabule. Did any difficulty arise, he was the man to meet it; was any advice necessary, he was the man to give it; and the safety of that advice could always be relied on, in as much as it was always given in accordance with and subject to those laws by which his whole life was regulated viz the laws of our Holy Church. Let his memory then not soon die out. Let those many shining examples he has set you, his requent and worthy communions, his weekly confessions, his daily attendance at the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, make that impression they should make, and when at some future meeting you adopt resolutions of regret, respect and sympathy, adopt one resolution more becoming to you as Catholics, and beneficial to him- a resolution binding the members to say a prayer for the repose of his soul. As a father, the Doctor was kind; as a husband, gentle; as a member of society, not only exemplary but a model. Some years ago it was a pleasant duty for me to address a few words of encouragement to the deceased. I congratulated him upon the happy event which then took place. I told him his future looked bright and happy. These words may have been true, but how short that future was? and she who to-day is dressed in the habiliments of grief, mourning a sad and irreparable loss, and towards whom the sympathies of the entire community are now extended, stood by his side on the auspicious occasion, decked in the gay attire of a bride, happy in the consciousness of being the possessor of a rich treasurey viz: the love of a true and devoted husband; but she too belongs to the same faith which he so edifyingly practiced and strongly defended, and her duty, as that faith teaches, is to bow in meek submission to the holy will of Him "who doeth all things well." To the father and mother, brothers and sisters of the deceased, I can say that this sad event is our which excites the sympathies of the entire community. In your sorrow you are not alone, for the poor who received assistance from him whom you morn, feel that they have lost a benefactor and a friend. The congreation has lost an exemplary member, and all, I am sure, extend to you those feelings which sore affliction to a neighbor should cause to arise. Let it, however, be a consolation to you to know that he died fortified by the sacraments-that his death was such as might have been expected after a good life, a peaceful and happy one-and let this thought dissipate the heavy cloud which now hangs over you viz: that your loss is his great-his eternal-gain.
     We need not follow the sad cortege through the pitiless storm to the cemetery. Even the elements seemed to grieve that so good a man should be returned to dust. But so it must be, sooner or later, with each of us. "Dust to dust, and the soul to God who gave it."


(Newspaper article from the Lake Shore Visitor: January 13, 1877)     W. JAMES BLAKELY, M.D.
     Truly does death love a shining mark. One of the noblest and best of human kind has been stricken down in our midst; with startling suddenness, in the very prime of life, and on the threshold of a career of eminence and usefulness. The whole community mourns his loss. In him the medical profession has lost one of its most learned, brilliant, and successful disciples; the Catholic Church a devoted and exemplary member and an able and fearless defender; society a bright and edifying ornament; and his immediate family circle a husband, father, son, brother and friend whose place cannot be filled this side the grave.
     Humanly speaking it is a bitter thing to know that the earthly remains of William James Blakely, but yesterday, as it were, in the full flush and vigor of life, to-day lie cold and silent on the bier, waiting the solemn rites that on the morrow are to consign them to the still more cold and silent grave. But it is consoling to remember that he was not all "of the earth, earthy." His soul still lives, and it is a sweet consolation to his friends to know that his life was a constant preparation for death, and to believe that his soul has gone to its eternal rest in Heaven. Without the slightest ostentation in his piety-for his unobtrusive nature shrank from ostentation of every kind-his daily life and conduct were shaped and guided by the precepts of our holy religion-of that religion that had been implanted in him at his mother's knee, and had become deeply rooted in his conscientious convictions. Religion was to him no mere form or matter of outward observance. It was far more. It was the "one thing necessary." The words of Christ, "Seek first the kingdom of God and His justice and all these things will be added unto you," were, in his ears, no prettily sounding phrase, to be listened to with momentary admiration, and then forgotten. No he heard and treasured up. He remembered and obeyed. And how beautiful was his life in consequence! How guileless, how pure, how just, how charitable, how serene, how humble! In short he was a Catholic,-but not in name merely. He was a Catholic in deed as well as in faith. Yes, Catholic faith, Catholic morality, Catholic charity, and Catholic piety were all exemplified in a marked manner in his daily life. And so, too, have they been exemplified in his death. After a very short, but severe illness, surrounded by his family,-that true wife so worthy in every way of such a husband-those three lovely children just able to lisp a prayer for their dying father-that aged mother who had taught him how to live, now come to teach him how to die-that reverend brother, the messenger of peace and minister of God, summoned to his bedside,and bearing to him in his mortal agony the consolations of the religion he had so loved in life,-amid such surroundings, and with the image of the Crucified upon his breast and a smile of peace upon his lips, his physical sufferings ceased, and his soul passed from its tenement of clay, leaving behind him the fragrance of a good name and the legacy of an example worthy of all imitation.
     Dr. Blakely was the son of James and Susan Blakely, (nee Smith) He was born in Pittsburgh April 26, 1839. At proper age he was sent to St. Francis' College, Loretto. Taking there a two years' preparatory course, he went next to Georgetown College, D. C., an institution that numbers among it alumni so many ripe scholars and distinguished men. There, after a six years' classical and scientific course, during which he was noted for intense application and energy, added to excellent natural talent, he graduated at the age of 18, with the highest honors of his class. Choosing the profession of medicine, he took a three years' course at the Medical Institute of Homeopathy and the Homeopathic Medical College of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, and received diplomas in the branches of medicine, obstetrics and surgery, in March, 1861. He established himself in practice in St. Mary's, Elk County, and married Miss Josephine Luhr, an amiable and accomplished young lady of that place, who was soon taken from him by death. In 1869 he removed to Erie, where, the next year he married Miss Mary Gensheimer. Here by seven years of patient toil, by real though modest merit, and by a conscientious fidelity to duty, he laid the foundations of a large and successful practice, and was rapidly rising to a high rank in his learned and honorable profession. He was an officer of both State and National Homeopathic Medical Societies.. He had recently been made president of the Young Men's Catholic Lyceum, of this place, and took a great interest in its welfare. Happily and worthily mated, and blessed with children greatly endeared to him, his ????? life, too, was without a cloud. But all these honors and blessings and bright prospects and opportunities of doing good, could not detain him here. This was not to be his abiding place. And so his career of domestic happiness, of professional fame and social usefulness has been suddenly cut short before reaching its zenith; and we who had learned to love and admire him, and had hoped so much for him and from him, are tempted to apostrophise Death in the bitter words of one who mourned, as we do, the loss of a friend, stricken down in the bright forenoon of a useful life: "Oh, thou destroyer of human hopes and happiness! was there no head frosted by time and bowed with cares, to which thy marble pillow could have afforded rest? Was there no heart-broken sufferer to seek refuge from his woes in thy cheerless habitation? Was there no insulated being whose crimes or miseries would have made thee welcome?-who had lived without a friend, and could die without a mourner?" But no, we dare not thus repine. We know that our heavenly Father doeth all things well, and we bow with sorrowing resignation to His holy will.
     Dr. Blakely's parents both survive him, and reside at St. Mary's He leaves four sisters and two brothers. His eldest sister is the venerable Mother Beatrice, O.S.B., of Nebraska City. Another, Mrs. Mary Ryan, now a widow, resides in Cincinnati. Another, Lavinia, is married to Sebastian Wimmer, Esq., of St. Marys, late member of the Legislature for that district. Another, Miss Sue Blakely, resides with her parents. His elder brother is Laurie J. Blakely, Esq., an attorney, of Covington Kentucky. The younger is Rev. Aloysius M. Blakely, one of the Passionist Fathers, of Dunkirk, New York, and who was summoned by telegraph in time to be present at his death.
     To these, his sorrowing friends, to his bereaved wife and helpless little ones, as yet but dimly conscious of their loss, to the Y. M. C. L., and to the entire Catholic community of Erie, who now only fully realize the worth of the bright exemplar they have lost,-we address, in conclusion, the words of one of his sisters, written on the occasion of his first great sorrow, and which we adapt to this occasion of still greater sorrow to his friends:
          "Faith looks aloft
     And sees his gentle spirit, freed
     From all earth's care, from human need,
     High in that Heaven, toward which so oft
     He turned his earnest eyes.
     O, blessed faith! thy light divine
     Can pierce the silent skies,
     And show the lost to earth, who shine
     As stars in Paradise.
     *     *     *     *     *
     Oh! stricken hearts! lift up your gaze,
     Beyond the tomb, so dark and chill,
     And see, through faith's so lightening rays
     In endless joy HE LIVETH STILL."
               -Rquiescat in Pace.
(From the same newpaper article as above)
(Communication.) The Lord his God is with him; and the sound of the victory of the King is him.-Num.xxiii.21.
     MR. EDITOR -- Dear Sir: No season --'seen the most joyous that brightens this earth-is without its shadow. The echoes of the grave are ever audible. No triumph, with its trumpets and chariots, has silenced them. No song of youth, or hope, or love, however, thrilling and divine, has stilled those dread "Voices of the Night." And so, in the very dawn of this New Year.-rosy and glowing with so many hopes and good resolves-there rises a cloud of sorrow above our path in the death of W. James Blakely, M.D. When a friend, as he was to us, departs this life, 'tis so much heart, so much truthfulness, so much genuine manfulness and goodness that disappears. These are no idle words. It is not idle to plant the Evergreen in the mould of that fresh grave, and so cluster it with the emblems of a remembrance that shall ever be green and a hope that shall never droop. Kindnesses, generous services, a bounteous welcome whenever we crossed his threshold, some five years of proven and unwavering friendship-these are, what at this moment make us feel that no words of ours, however laudatory they may appear to strangers, are out of place when applied to Doctor Blakely.
     A strict, practical Catholic, conscientious, honest even to a nicety, unpretending in an extreme degree, guileless as a child, yet ever bravely true to his convictions and the promptings of his heart, a man of no common worth has been lost in him. Of no common worth, we repeat it; for now-a-days, selfishness prevails, and cunning supplants the natural benevolence of the race; insincerities multiply themselves in every walk of life. And so that public honors or prosperity be achieved, no pervesion of God's best gifts, whether of wisdom, or eloquence, or hardihood, or graceousness of manner, or religiosity itself is held to be a crime. Not to fill his cash-box, not to conciliate the haughty Dives and secure him as a patron, not to shun the slightest or the weightiest consequence which his even persistency in what he thought right might entail upon him; not to save save himself from beggary, were that itself to be the chastisement of his integrity would he compromise an atom of what he treasured as the truth; This was exemplified in the noble stand taken by him in defence of Catholic education at the grand metting of the laity at St. Mary's Hall, some months since.
     In him, too, the poor of Erie have lost a sympathizing friend and a skilled physician ever ready to attend them; the hope of fee or reward being a secondary consideration with him. The Young Men's Catholic Lyceum has now to mourn the untimely decease of its president, and has now one brotherly hand less to guide and help it on its road to success.
     On every occasion when the lovers of Catholic education in the future meet to serve in any way their good cause, or to defend it and their spiritual directors from calummy, or to contribute to any charitable or religious enterprize which may be set on foot, Dr. Blakely will be missed. It must be so; since, for years, he has been identified in Erie, with all the charities and labors that have had the good of religion, in that city or elsewhere, for their guiding star. Of the home he leaves desolate, we cannot bring ourselves to speak. Suffice it to say that the bereaved widow and her orphaned little ones have the sympathy of the entire community of Erie. CATHOLIC PARENT.     Erie Jan. 10, 1877 on 13 January 1877. 
Biography*  William James Blakely, the sixth child and first son of James and Susanna [Smyth] Blakely, joined this full house on the 26 of April 1839. James Cochran and Catherine McCauley [his maternal aunt and her husband] were the sponsors when he was presented at St. Paul’s Cathedral for baptism on the 5th of May 1839. William began his education at St. Vincent’s in Latrobe Pennsylvania. He later attended St. Francis School in Loretto Pennsylvania, where he studied for two years, taking preparatory classes. He then transferred to Georgetown College in Washington D. C. Where, after six more years of classical and scientific studies, he graduated in 1858 with the highest honors of his class. Choosing the profession of medicine, he took a three-year course of study at the Medical Institute of Homeopathy and the Homeopathic Medical College of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia, and he received degrees in medicine, obstetrics and surgery.

To quote from A History of Allegheny County:
Dr. William J. Blakely, a native of Pittsburgh and student of Dr. J. P. Dake, graduated at the Homeopathic Medical College of      Pennsylvania, in the class of 1861.

He lived in Pittsburgh for a short time before he moved to St. Marys in Elk County where he was a surgeon working for a section of the Philadelphia & Erie Railway. While living in St. Marys, Dr. Blakely met the amiable and accomplished Josephine Luhr, daughter of Joseph and Barbara [Loesch] Luhr.

Dr. Blakely and Josephine Luhr were married on May 10, 1864 in St. Marys, but only ten short months later, Josephine died in childbirth on March 13, 1865. The grief stricken husband buried his new bride and their stillborn son, whom they named John Becan Blakely, on the Blakely family lot in St. Marys Catholic Cemetery.

In the years following the loss of his wife and son, Dr. Blakely met Mary Gensheimer of Erie Pennsylvania. By 1870, Dr. Blakely left St. Marys and moved his practice to Erie, where he and Mary Gensheimer were married on August 25, 1870. Dr. William and Mary [Gensheimer] Blakely welcomed into their hearts and lives four children; Eugene, Josephine, Susan and James A. Blakely.

On January 7, 1877, Dr. William James Blakely died suddenly from pneumonia contracted from one of his patients. He left a grieving widow with four very young children, ranging in age from six to newborn (perhaps just months old).
The newspaper accounts of his untimely death are many and lengthy. The following is part of the eulogy, delivered by Father Casey, as quoted in the Erie newspaper:
We are assembled here today, kind friends, to pay the last sad tribute to the memory of one who was well known and highly respected in this community. Persons of all classes are here. The non-Catholic is      present because in the person of the deceased, during life, he recognized all those qualities of heart and of mind that united, makes the gentlemen of sterling worth. By all such, he was known as a           member of his profession, gifted with an ability more than ordinary, possessed of an honor and an integrity far beyond reproach. They may have had frequently met him in the performance of his professional duties, and had learned to regard him as a physician most anxious to advance the interests of the school to which he belonged, and ever ready and willing to assist his fellow man, no matter what creed or color; hence throwing all religious feeling aside, they manifest by their presence today, that the deceased, although a devoted Catholic, had won for himself many true and warm-hearted friends amongst those who are strangers to his cherished faith.
The Catholic and particularly members of this congregation are here to perform a most sacred duty. They are here for a higher, holier purpose. They have been taught that all ends not with death, that no      matter how well the life may have been led, there perhaps may have been some fault unatoned for, since they know that God in His all-wise judgment is scrupulously just and exacting; hence they are here for the purpose of uniting with the priest at the altar in asking God to forgive whatever may have been amiss in the life of the deceased. He was one who not only practiced his religion, but understood it well, and as well, knew how to defend it. Were any of its principals attacked, any of its sacred institutions slandered, the hand that is now stilled in death was ready and willing to use the pen in their defense, and the tongue that is now hushed in the keep silence of the grave, often uttered words that bore with them conviction, because they proceeded from a heart sincerely honest. In a literary point of view, the deceased was a man of no mean ability. Of a studious turn of mind, he kept himself well posted not only on new developments that might be made in the science of medicine, but on all topics of interest, whether civil or religious. His highest ambition appeared to have been to diffuse around him as far as he could, that knowledge which he himself possessed, and hence we find him interested in associations of a literary character, and today one of these societies, the Young Men’s Catholic Lyceum, have turned out in body to do honor to him whom a few days ago unanimously chose to be their president. As a father, the Doctor was kind; as a husband, gentle; as a member of society, not only exemplary but a model. Some years ago it was a pleasant duty for me to address a few words of encouragement to the deceased. I congratulated him upon the happy event, which then took place. I told him his future looked bright and happy. These words may have been true, but how short that future was. And she who      today is dressed in the habiliments of grief, mourning a sad and irreparable loss, and towards whom the sympathies of the entire community are now extended, stood by his side on the auspicious occasion, decked in the gay attire of a bride, happy in the      consciousness of being the possessor of a rich treasury, viz-a-vie the love of a true and devoted husband; but she too belongs to the same faith which he so edifyingly practiced and strongly defended, and her duty, as that faith teaches, is to bow in meek submission to the holy will of Him ‘who doeth all things well’. To the father and mother, brothers and sisters of the deceased, I can say that this sad event is one, which excites the sympathies of the entire community. In your sorrow you are not alone, for the poor who received assistance from him whom you mourn, feel that they have lost a benefactor and a friend. Let it be a consolation to you to know that he died fortified with the sacraments, that his death was such as might have been expected after a good life, a peaceful and happy one; and let this thought dissipate the heavy cloud which now hangs over you, that your loss is his eternal gain.

Mary raised her family, with the help of her loving parents. It seems that she survived her husband by many years although her date of death is unknown. Perhaps one day an heir of one of the four children of Dr. William James and Mary [Gensheimer] Blakely will be located and the story of each of them will be revealed.
 
Employment* He wasa doctor at Physican. 
Graduation*circa 1859 He was graduated circa 1859 at Georgetown & Jefferson Med., Philadelphia, PA; The following is from SLB's "Reminiscenses" One of the elder sons, William James Blakely, graduated at Georgetown and at the Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. He died at an early age, having contracted pneumonia on his return from a visit to a patient. Another source says he graduated with the class of 1861 from the Homeopathic medical college of Pennsylvania. 
Residence*1861 He lived in 1861 at St. Mary's, Elk County, PA; On page 98 of a History of Allegheny County Pennsylvania is found the following: "Dr. William J. Blakely, a native of Pittsburgh and student of Dr. J.P. Dake graduated at the Homeopathic Medical College of Pennsylvania in the class of 1861. He located in Pittsburgh for a short time then he removed to Elk County where he was surgeon for a portion of the Philadelphia and Erie Railway until 1869 when he removed to Erie where he is now residing. (MVW suspects this accounts for why his parents chose St. Mary's when they lost everything in Pittsburgh and had to start over.) 
Employmentcirca 1875  Circa 1875 at Center Street, St. Mary's, Elk County, PA, He had a store in St. Marys. His sister Lavinia was said to have visited him at the store. This is probably the store that is mentioned in connection with Laurie John Blakely as well. James Blakely (father) also kept a store.5 

Family

Mary Gensheimer b. 1850, d. circa 1930
MARRIAGE*25 August 1870 He married Mary Gensheimer on 25 August 1870 at Erie, PA, Need to check these witnesses. I believe they go with Marriage #1 not this marriage #2. 
Children
Last Edited7 Sep 2009

Citations

  1. [S52] 1850 Census;.
  2. [S38] Baptismal Entry St. Paul, Diocese of Pittsburgh
    Synod Hall
    125 N. Craig Street
    Pittsburgh, PA 15213
    412-621-6217 Fax 412-621-6237.
  3. [S14] SLB Diary.
  4. [S463] "Sebastian Wimmer Diary,."
  5. [S457] Charles J. Schaut, Early St. Marys.
  6. [S56] 1880 Census;.

Henry Donald Blauvelt1,2

M, #3123, b. 12 November 1925, d. 29 January 1969
ChartsWilliam Landrum
PETER LANDRUM
Birth*12 November 1925 Henry Donald Blauvelt was born on 12 November 1925.2 
MARRIAGE*3 September 1948 He married Lillian Maude Baldwin, daughter of John Dwight Baldwin and Lillian Maude Lendrum, on 3 September 1948.1,2 
Death*29 January 1969 He died on 29 January 1969 at age 43.2 

Family

Lillian Maude Baldwin b. 26 August 1929
Child
Last Edited20 Feb 2002

Citations

  1. [S488] Lillian Hudson Lendrum, "unknown short title," e-mail to Margot Woodrough, March 12 2001.
  2. [S499] Lillian Blauvelt, "Note from Lillian Blauvelt."

Lisa Margaret Blauvelt1

F, #3373, b. 29 February 1960, d. 12 November 1986
Father*Henry Donald Blauvelt1 b. 12 Nov 1925, d. 29 Jan 1969
Mother*Lillian Maude Baldwin1 b. 26 Aug 1929
Relationships4th cousin of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
4th cousin of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Landrum
PETER LANDRUM
Birth*29 February 1960 Lisa Margaret Blauvelt was born on 29 February 1960.1 
 She was the daughter of Henry Donald Blauvelt and Lillian Maude Baldwin.1 
Death*12 November 1986 She died on 12 November 1986 at age 26.1 
Last Edited20 Feb 2002

Citations

  1. [S499] Lillian Blauvelt, "Note from Lillian Blauvelt."

Christopher (Kit) Bloodworth

M, #1175, b. 1861
ChartsZachariah Davis
Birth*1861 Christopher (Kit) Bloodworth was born in 1861 Date from Bob Bridger. 
MARRIAGE*22 January 1882 He married Ellifair Davis, daughter of Zacharias Davis and Elizabeth King, on 22 January 1882 at Pulaski County, GA.1 

Family

Ellifair Davis b. 1865, d. June 1890
Last Edited18 Jul 2003

Citations

  1. [S339] Unknown subject unknown repository.

Elizabeth Blount

F, #1135, b. 24 December 1831, d. 27 May 1900
ChartsWILLIAM BASSE
Birth*24 December 1831  This is a guess since she is Elizabeth and is buried in Floyd Family Cemetery. There is and Elizabeth there born 1831 died 1900 who could be this person. 
MARRIAGE*5 April 1860 Elizabeth Blount married his second wife Amos Kinchen Floyd, son of Federick (Fed) Floyd and Mourning Bass, on 5 April 1860 at Pulaski County, GA.1
Marriage Certificate of Amos Floyd and Elizabeth Blount
Burial*1900 She was buried in 1900 at Floyd Family Cemetery, Bleckley County, GA.2
Death*27 May 1900 She died on 27 May 1900 at GA at age 68.2 
Married Name5 April 1860  As of 5 April 1860,her married name was Floyd.1 
Census1860 She appeared on the census of 1860 at Pulaski County, GA.3 
CENSUS1870*1870 She was shown on the 1870 census in 1870 at GA; He was living with wife and children next door to an adult son and both father and son were listed as "planter" indicating they survived the war if decent financial condition.4
Census*1880 She appeared on the census of 1880 at GA.5 

Family

Amos Kinchen Floyd b. 11 April 1816, d. after 29 September 1900
MARRIAGE*5 April 1860 She married his second wife Amos Kinchen Floyd, son of Federick (Fed) Floyd and Mourning Bass, on 5 April 1860 at GA.1
Marriage Certificate of Amos Floyd and Elizabeth Blount
Children
Last Edited4 May 2007

Citations

  1. [S2] Harris, History of Pulaski County.
  2. [S502] June Adams, Betsy Smith Robin Mullis, Bleckley County, Georgia Cemeteries.
  3. [S54] 1860 Census;, Shown living with wife #2 in house 449.
  4. [S55] 1870 Census;, Living with wife #2 in house #890.
  5. [S56] 1880 Census;, Living with husband in house # 445.

Martha Ellafair Blount1

F, #1160, b. 30 October 1841, d. 25 September 1903
ChartsZachariah Davis (#1)
Zachariah Davis (#2)
ZACHARIAS DAVIS (#1)
ZACHARIAS DAVIS (#2)
Birth*30 October 1841 Martha Ellafair Blount was born on 30 October 1841 at GA.2,3 
MARRIAGE*20 October 1860 She married James (Jim) Henry Davis, son of Zacharias Davis and Elizabeth King, on 20 October 1860 When James Henrywent off to the War of Succession he asked his brother, Thomas Davis to look after his wife Martha Ella and their baby Elizabeth. Family lore says he had a feeling that he would not return from the war. And James Henry was indeed killed during that war. Jimmie Lee Davis.4 
MARRIAGE18 March 1867 She married Thomas (Tom) Davis, son of Zacharias Davis and Elizabeth King, on 18 March 1867 at Pulaski County, GA.5 
Burial*1903 She was buried in 1903 at Floyd Family Cemetery, Bleckley County, GA.3
Death*25 September 1903 She died on 25 September 1903 at age 61.3 
Married Name20 October 1860  As of 20 October 1860,her married name was Davis. 
Note*2003  Bob Bridger says Benjamin and James may be the same person. 

Family 1

James (Jim) Henry Davis b. circa 1842, d. circa 1861
MARRIAGE*20 October 1860 She married James (Jim) Henry Davis, son of Zacharias Davis and Elizabeth King, on 20 October 1860 When James Henrywent off to the War of Succession he asked his brother, Thomas Davis to look after his wife Martha Ella and their baby Elizabeth. Family lore says he had a feeling that he would not return from the war. And James Henry was indeed killed during that war. Jimmie Lee Davis.4 
Child

Family 2

Thomas (Tom) Davis b. 1846, d. August 1900
MARRIAGE18 March 1867 She married Thomas (Tom) Davis, son of Zacharias Davis and Elizabeth King, on 18 March 1867 at GA.5 
Children
Last Edited30 Aug 2010

Citations

  1. 1880 census gives her name as Ellen.
  2. [S56] 1880 Census;.
  3. [S502] June Adams, Betsy Smith Robin Mullis, Bleckley County, Georgia Cemeteries.
  4. [S332] Unknown subject unknown repository.
  5. [S608] Jimmie Lee Davis, "unknown short title," e-mail to MVW.