Mary Basse1

F, #2938
Father*John Basse1 d. bt 1820 - 1821
Relationships5th cousin 6 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
5th cousin 6 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
 Mary Basse was the daughter of John Basse.1 
Last Edited1 Dec 1999

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Mary Basse1

F, #3119
Father*Edward Basse1 b. 8 May 1622, d. Sep 1696
Mother*Mary Tucker1 d. b 21 Apr 1713
Relationships1st cousin 11 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
1st cousin 11 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
 Mary Basse was the daughter of Edward Basse and Mary Tucker.1 
Last Edited26 Nov 2000

Citations

  1. [S487] John Bass, Documents MVW file.

Matthew Basse1

M, #2900, b. 24 December 1684
Father*Richard Basse1 b. 2 Aug 1658, d. 26 Dec 1722
Mother*Jane Bryant1 b. 17 Dec 1665, d. 14 Feb 1689/90
Relationships1st cousin 10 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
1st cousin 10 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
Birth*24 December 1684 Matthew Basse was born on 24 December 1684 at VA.1 
 He was the son of Richard Basse and Jane Bryant.1 
Last Edited30 Nov 1999

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Nathaniel Basse1

M, #2272, b. 19 December 1589, d. 1655
Note Caption saying, Nathaniel Bass his book. It is apparently Nathaniel's signature.
Father*Humphrey Basse b. c 1564, d. 4 Jun 1616
Mother*Mary Buscher b. c 1568, d. 1616
Relationships11th great-grandfather of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
11th great-grandfather of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
ReferenceB-6272
Christening*19 December 1589 Nathaniel Basse was christened on 19 December 1589 at London, England.2,3 
 He was the son of Humphrey Basse and Mary Buscher
MARRIAGE*21 May 1613 He married Mary Jordan on 21 May 1613 at London, England.2,4,5 
Death*1655 He was buried in 1655 at St. Alphage, Cripplegate, London, England; Old Basse family notes say that ffather (sic) Nathaniel Basse departed this life in Middlesex (illegible) a Google search reveals that Middlesex is the city of London, in 1654. St. Alphage was located in the city wall. The following from the William and Mary Quarterly should put to rest the idea that Nathaniel died without heirs. "Basse's Choce" originally called for three hundred acres,but its acreage was really four hundred, of which two hundred and fifty acres was marsh land. Mr. Peter Knight, who may have married one of Basse's daughters, patented one hundred and fifty acres of the same in 1640, and two hundred and fifty-five in 1643. It was situated on the east side of Pagan Bay. Peter Knight sold the tract to John Bland, the eminent London merchant, and in 1659-'60 the General Assembly ordered Mr. William Drummond as agent of "the coheirs of Basse" to pay Theodorick Bland, of Westover, brother and agent of John Bland, twenty-five hundred pounds of tobacco damages awarded in some suit probably affecting this land. Note that the Govonor's name was Sir John Harvey Knight.2
ST ALPHAGE IN THE WALL LONDON
This map of London shows the location of St. Alphage. It was at the "cripple gate" entrance through the London wall.
Burial*3 July 1655 He was buried on 3 July 1655 One last point, you have referenced Albert Bell’s mistaken date for the burial of Nathaniel Basse. It’s the only mistake he made that I know of, but it is without question a mistake. He places Nathaniel’s burial on 3 July 1654 when it actually occurred on 3 July 1655. As I have stated in the Polemic, I have corresponded directly with the Guildhall Library’s Keeper of Manuscripts:

I have received a transcription of the burial record for Nathaniel Bass (sic) from St. Alphage Church, “The parish register of St. Alphage London Wall (Guildhall Library Ms 5746/1): ‘July 3rd Nathaniel Bass [sic] in the Church.’ The burial took place in 1655” --Guildhall Library Manuscripts Section, Aldermanbury, London EC2P 2EJ, Tel: 020 7332 1863. The statement that the burial took place in 1655 is that of the Keeper of Manuscripts: Stephen Freeth. He states, “Having re-examined the microfilm of burials in St. Alphage London Wall 1613-1678 (Guildhall Library Ms 5746/1), I can confirm that the transcription is correct and that the burial of Nathaniel Bass took place July 3rd 1655. As I am sure you are aware, the old system of dating meant that the new year occurred at the end of March, as opposed to the end of December as it is now. It is possible that the confusion arose as the page displaying this entry is headed 1654. However, the margin clearly shows the beginning of 1655 at the end of March. I hope this has clarified the matter for you.”.4 
EMAIL*  Don Floyd and I have corresponded for thirty years on the Bass/Floyd family. Here is a thought he presented in 2005:
Margot: I don't remember your sending me anything earlier about Nathaniel Basse being a Puritan. The recent e-mail is the only thing I have a record of in this regard. I'm a little skeptical about it, although I think it's possible that he was a Puritanic supporter or lean-toward. A contemporary of his named Edward Bennett was reported in one source as being a Puritan. But I have my doubts about that, too. Three months after Nathaniel 's arrival in the Virginia Colony, the first Council and House of Burgesses met at Jamestown and in 1621, Bennett, a rich merchant from London, received a patent for a plantation upon the condition of settling 200 immigrants. One hundred and twenty new residents arrived in February 1622 and settled along the James River at what was then called Warrosquoyacke, or sometimes Edward Bennett's Plantation. It seems to me that if Bennett were so preoccupied with making tons of money and running a plantation, he would have little time to be an effective Puritan. There may well have been Puritans among his group, probably seeking a more agreeable religious environment in an area somewhat untainted by religious control and/or persecution. What irony that the Puritans turned into holy terrors. That seems to always be the case with religious zealots. But I degress.
Same goes for Nathaniel Basse. It seems that Nathaniel was too busy running a plantation, serving in the early legislature, making trips to London and overseeing Thomas or Thomasine Hall to be a very effective Puritan. His focus, it seems to me, was on making money and rounding up recruits in England to come back to the colony. Too, in his leadership position I don't think he would have done anything to jeopardize his standing in the community and with the powers that be. Attendance in the Church of England was required by British law in Virginia as well as Ireland -- and perhaps other places. I'm sure he was in the Church of England every Sunday along with his family. If he were to skip church and not have a satisfactory reason, he could be fined. I have a record of two other men being fined for such an infraction. If he did have Puritan leanings, they would be on the side, I think. These days, everybody with community standing goes to either the First Baptist Chuch, the First Methodist Church, the First Presbyterian Church or perhaps All-Saints Hallelujah Episcopal Church. It's expected, and business is often discussed quietly in the halls or outside. Now they may watch Tammy Faye on TV, but that is just a diversion. I don't think it was any different in those days. Nathaniel went to the Church of England, and it was a perfect place for all sorts of conversations. He still could have consorted with Puritans, and probably did. As a leader, he would have to, it seems.

There is one thing about Nathaniel, though, that should be examined to see if it gave cause to possibly flee Virginia. This is all speculation, and it is what-if speculation. If Nathaniel were, indeed, a Puritan or a Puritan lean-toward, and it were found out, he could be in dangerous territory around 1650. Around that time all the Puritans were driven out of Virginia, and I guess they all ended up in Massachusetts, and again that is glorious irony. But guess where Nathaniel went. You got it: London, dying there in 1654.6
 
Anecdote  From Don Floyd:


The Floyds and their uniqueness

The Floyd family is a fascinating study, veiled at times with mystery and often muddled by elfish unpredictability. They are unique. They are rare. They are elusive. But persistent research over a span of 35 years has uncovered some amazing stories about them, who they were, and whom they married.

Still, there are gaps in the story, much like missing pieces from a jigsaw puzzle. When the puzzle is assembled to near completion, the viewer can analyze the shape and size of the missing pieces and gain additional clues to what they are by observing the scenery around them. We consider our book, The Elusive Floyds, a beginning. Future research will reveal more. The Floyds are elusive, but they can be found.

Their greatest talent, it seems, was the ability to marry well. This suggests that they were a handsome and strong lot and were attractive to women needing safety amid unsafe surroundings. And when we say “marry well” we are talking, for example, about an 1803 wedding in North Carolina where Mourning Bass, a descendant from the high wealth of London, married Federick Floyd, a man of humble background. Mourning’s earliest Bass ancestor to make a home in Virginia was John Basse (the original French spelling) along with his Nansemond Indian wife. But Mourning’s rich genealogical trail goes back further to London and to the elite of Northern France.

The Basse family were among the few Europeans to settle in Virginia about 1618 and survive the Powhatan Indian Massacre of 1622 when 347 Englishmen were slain. John had memories of London, but he soon found himself adjusting in Virginia to what circumstances required. During this ongoing lifestyle change, he married the daughter of the king of the militant Nansemond Nation (called tribe today) in 1638 and chose to live with the Nansemonds, thereby enjoying the protection afforded to his Nansemond wife.

As we continue our research today we often find family historical nuggets that are nothing short of phenomenal. One such story features Nathaniel Basse, who in 1616 inherited his father’s stock in The Virginia Company. But that stock was only a very small portion of Humfrey Basse’s overall wealth. He left a will in London that is one of the longest in English history. The stock most likely brought Nathaniel to Virginia for further investment. Before it was over, however, he most likely suffered financial losses. So did The Virginia Company which never turned a profit, and its charter was revoked by King James I.

Beginning about 1622, Nathaniel Basse operated Basse’s Choice, a plantation commonly called a hundred, south of the James River very near present-day Smithfield. He also served in the House of Burgesses in 1623 and 1629, and in the Colonial Council between 1624 and 1629 and was the chief judicial authority in the area of Basse’s Choice. As a member of the House of Burgesses, he was instrumental in developing the model of representation for all future colonies, including Massachusetts. He also traveled, under orders of the governor, to such places as Nova Scotia, Dutch settlements and possibly the West Indies to negotiate trade deals. He was a key figure in early American history but history books have for the most part ignored him.

About 1623, after apparently coming to America from Northern Ireland and possibly having a link to southwestern Scotland, Thomas Floyd lived at West and Sherlow Hundred near Jamestown. Living at West and Sherlow suggests that he was an indentured servant working on the plantation. After examining the records of all Floyds of the 17th century in Virginia and surrounding areas between 1618 and 1700, we conclude that this Thomas Floyd most likely was our first ancestor in Virginia, but we have no proof. Our Floyds became centered in Isle of Wight County, Va. Family oral history says we are Irish, but it is possible that we are Scots-Irish, who lived in Northern Ireland and originally were from Scotland.

One factor that impedes Floyd research is our rarity. The National Geographic’s Genographic Project, an ongoing five-year DNA study of the migration patterns of humans from northeastern Africa over the past 60,000 years, confirmed that our Floyds possess DNA that places us in Haplogroup G, which makes up about 3 percent of the population, and our Floyds make up a small fraction of that 3 percent. There are some Floyds from Ireland who do not share our DNA. And there is one family of Floyds that is neither Irish nor Scottish. It is Welsh. Their original name was ap Lloyd, the gray one, and this name evolved into Floyd. In our case, the Gaelic name Tuile, was anglicized to Flood while under English dominion and evolved into Floyd or Floid possibly because of the way Irishmen pronounced Flood: “flow-id.”

One of the more exciting features of the Floyd story is its link with two men of kinship who put America on a course toward permanency and eventually toward national sovereignty. Nathaniel Basse was one. Another was Basse’s father-in-law Samuel Jordan, who was among a handful of Englishmen involved in saving Jamestown from collapse during its darkest hour about 1610. Three months before The Mayflower, Samuel Jordan in June 1609 boarded The Sea Venture in Plymouth and set sail for the New World. The recently built state-of-the-art vessel was one of eight ships to set sail that day on a mission called The Third Supply, providing new settlers and provisions for a corporation called Virginia.

Six to eight weeks out, the flotilla ran into a powerful storm – assumed to be a hurricane – and was pummeled for almost 48 hours. The Sea Venture could not hold up during the storm because it had a major flaw. Its caulking had not been allowed to thoroughly dry before the ship’s departure at Plymouth. The other seven ships survived and proceeded to Jamestown. The Sea Venture, meanwhile, was foundering somewhere in the unseen distance. Directly, the ship’s master spotted land – the Bermudas – and ordered the ship in that direction. The ship became snared between two coral reefs – which may have been a saving factor for the passengers and crew. The ship never sank and all passengers and crew were believed to have survived. However, there were some deaths on land weeks to months after the passengers and crew went ashore.

A star in the making in the Bermudas was a possible kinsman of Samuel Jordan. He was Sea Venture passenger Sylvester Jourdain, who wrote an account of the storm that bore much similarity to William Shakespeare’s “The Tempest,” but Jourdain wrote his account a good year before Shakespeare staged his play in 1611. If Shakespeare used Jourdain’s material, which was published and widely available in London as early as 1610, he did not plagiarize but simply used a journalistic account as a basis for his story. He also could have drawn from at least one other account. Both Jordan and Jourdain originally were from Dorsetshire.

Samuel Jordan and the rest in the Bermudas undertook to build two small ships from Sea Venture salvage and from such native resources as cedar. It took 10 months or so to finish the two ships and then set sail for Jamestown in 1610. Samuel Jordan and the others apparently had lived in a healthy environment in the Bermudas. After arriving in Jamestown, they were shocked by what they saw: blank stares, emaciated bodies, disarray, and a seeming desire to flee the misery of life. Of a one-time population of about 500, only 50 or so were left, and they were planning to set sail for England the next day. But Samuel Jordan and his associates were able to revive their spirits, provide food for the hungry and comfort the sick. Within a few days, the 50 were feeling good about staying in Virginia. It was one of the most important developments in American history. Without it, today’s America most likely would not exist. Instead, Spain likely would rule. It is reported that Spain had already used spies and poison against Jamestown.

There is much more we are sharing in this book about the Floyds and related families, but above all, we are
presenting a human story – a story made up of many human stories. We have, for the most part, shunned lists.
We want to bring you face to face with your ancestors so that you might see who they were and how they lived. After all, when you look in the mirror today, they are there looking back. 
Anecdote1608  In 1608 Nathaniel's father, Humphrey Basse was a stockholder in the Virginia Company meaning that Nathaniel was likely to seek his fortune in the new venture of the company, Jamestown.

Nathaniel Basse settled at Basses Choice, 1619
In the early spring of 1608, Captain John Smith, driven by the necessity of obtaining food for the famishing colonists at Jamestown, crossed the river and obtained fourteen bushels of corn from a tribe of Indians called the Warrosquoyackes. Again in December of the same year, Captain Smith, while on his way to visit Powhatan on the York River, spent his first night with this same tribe. In the spring of 1610, the discouraged settlers who were departing Jamestown spent their first night there.

The Warrosquoyackes occupied a village near what is now known as Fergusson's Wharf and their hunting grounds extended along the James River about five miles and inland about twenty. They had a fighting strength of forty to fifty warriors. Captain Smith records that the king of this tribe later furnished him with two guides to accompany a soldier named Sicklemore in searching for the "lost colony" of Sir Walter Raleigh on Roanoke Island, to no avail. The king also warned Smith against the treachery of Powhatan.

The first English settlement in this area was by a group led by Captain Christopher Lawne. In late 1618/early 1619, he and seven associates received a patent from the London Company to establish a plantation in Virginia. On May 21, 1613, Captain Nathaniel Basse (1589-1654) and his wife Mary Jourdan (1591-1630) were married in London, Middlesex, England. After their first four children were born in London, the Basses came to Virginia on March 27, 1619. They arrived at Jamestown with one hundred other settlers on the Marygolde commanded by Captain Evans. They immediately settled near the mouth of a creek on the south side of the James which is still known as Lawne's Creek. Captain Lawne and Ensign Washer represented the settlement known as Lawne's Plantation in the first House of Burgesses on July 30, 1619. After Lawne died on November 11, 1619, the Company instructed the remaining associates that, in order to maintain their patent, new settlers must be transported to replace those who had died. They had until midsummer 1625 to bring the census up to 200. The Company also declared that the plantation was to be henceforth known as Isle of Wight. Had this not occurred, we might still be wrestling with the many spellings of Warrosquoyacke, the former name.

On November 4, 1620, the associates submitted a petition to the Company to reconfirm their patent for Isle of Wight Plantation and subsequently renamed Isle of Wight County. On April 2, 1621, Nathaniel Basse shipped to England on the Supply to recruit new colonists for the plantation. On November 21, 1621, Edward Bennett, a rich merchant of London, was granted a patent for a plantation upon the condition of settling two hundred immigrants. On the same day, Arthur Swaine, Nathaniel Basse and others applied for a patent to establish "Basses Choice" plantation and the patent was granted on January 30, 1622. This was a 5,000 (800?) acre site on the west side of the Warrosquoyacke (now Pagan) River near Smithfield, Isle of Wight County, now off State Route 10.

Sadly, while the Basses were in England, many of the settlers on the plantation were killed during the Good Friday Massacre (It being on Good Friday is a myth resulting from the double dating of the time. Actually it was 1622/23.)

The story that two of the Basse children were slain in the massacre is entirely bogus as proved by Stephaun Paul in his "polemic" "I’m only aware of the legend of Humphrey dying in the massacre. I cannot emphasize this more strongly; the legend of Humphrey dying in the massacre is based on a misunderstanding of double dates. IT IS ABSOLUTELY FALSE! As I prove in the Polemic, it was impossible for Humphrey to have died in the massacre. He died the following year. There can be no doubt that Humphrey died a year-to-date from the massacre, probably in the Plague of the Abigail. I really don’t want to see this error further perpetuated. Following is the proof as I’ve stated it in the Polemic:
http://web.me.com/depaul7/Polemic/Welcome.html

It appears that Mary traveled with Nathaniel since their son Edward was born while they were in London. Their sons John and William may have been with them, but the fate of their other son, Anthony, is unknown. However, some miraculous escapes were reported in the south river settlements. Using guns, spades, axes, brickbats and whatever was available, a small company of thirty inhabitants fought off the Indians. After this, all Warrosquoyacke, from Hog Island down the river for fourteen miles, was abandoned. In the early fall, Sir George Yeardley commanded an expedition which drove out the Warrosquoyackes and the Nansemonds, burned their houses and took their corn. The proprietors of the abandoned settlements took heart, and were allowed to return. The census of 1624 showed 33 living at "Warwick Squeak" and 20 at Basses Choice. [www - Isle of Wight]

Upon returning to Virginia on the Furtherance, Nathaniel was referred to as Captain as well as "Gentleman." On February 16, 1623, on May 10, 1625, and again on October 16, 1629 he was elected to the House of Burgesses for Warrosquoyacke. Basse was commissioned to hold courts in 1623, to try all cases except capital offenses in 1626, and to be Justice of the Peace in 1632. He also was named Commander of Warrasquoyacke County in 1628. In 1631, he was appointed to the Governor's Council of Virginia. "In March 1631, Governor Harvey commissioned Nathaniel Basse to go to New England, Nova Scotia, or the West Indies and invite the inhabitants to Virginia, if any are so inclined, especially if those of New England dislike the coldness of the climate or the bareness of the soil, to offer them Delaware Bay. This is the last appearance of Nathaniel Basse in the Isle of Wight, and his fate is unknown." [Boddie, 92]
Given these choices, it seems logical that he might have gone to the warm climate of the Indies. He reportedly had in his possession a book "The Naturall and Moral Historie of the East and West Indies." Maybe this indicates that the area was of particular interest to him. It also is reported that the surname Bass is very common in the Caribbean, particularly on St. Kitts. There are records of names like Richard Bass and Nathaniel Bass on several of the islands in the 1600s. However, his brother, Samuel, was an early and prominent citizen of Massachusetts, having arrived in Roxbury about 1632. There is some evidence that he first may have gone with Samuel to Massachusetts, and then to the Indies. A 1654 disposition for his sisters in London indicates that he died in "Virginea" before August 30, 1654. He was buried in London on July 3, 1654/55.4 
Anecdote1608  In 1608 at Isle of Wight County, VA, Here is a historical sketch that serves to illuminate the times.
The first occupants of this county known to history were the Warrascoyack Indians. Their village was seated somewhere on Burwell's Bay, on James river, and their territory extended some five miles along the shore and twenty miles inland. Their fighting strength amounted to forty warriors. They were visited by John Smith in the summer of 1608, and fourteen bushels of corn were supplied by them to the famishing colonists at James- town. When Smith and his party set out in December, 1608, to visit Powhatan at Werewocomoco, on the York, they spent their first night at Warrascoyack. Here they left Michael Sicklemore, a valiant soldier, whom the Indian king promised to furnish with guides to search the country about Roanoke Island for the lost colony of Sir Walter Raleigh, and Samuel Collier, a boy, who was to learn the Indian language. The chief warned Smith to be on his guard against Powhatan, and acted in good faith towards Sicklemore(1) and Collier.(2) The first English settlement in Isle of Wight county was begun by Capt. Christopher Lawne and his associates, Sir Richard Worsley, knight baronet; Nathaniel Basse, gent., John Hobson, gent., Anthony Olevan, Richard Wiseman, Robt. Newland, Robert Gyner, and William Wellis.
(1) On April 27, 1619, Capt. Lawne arrived in person at Jamestown, with one hundred settlers, in a ship commanded by Capt. Evans. Sicklemore was furnished with two guides, penetrated to the Roanoke, but found no trace of the lost colony.
(2) Samuel Collier became proficient in the Indian language, and was accidentally killed by a white sentinel at Kecaughtan (Hampton) in 1622.
They settled near the mouth of a creek on the south side, still known as Lawne's creek. This creek, whose name is sometimes written "Lyon's Creek," was made the dividing line between the counties of Surry and Isle of Wight, as early as 1642. Capt. Lawne and Ensign Washer represented the settlement in the first House of Burgesses, which met at Jamestown July 30, 1619. All new settlements are unhealthy, and terrible mortality prevailed among these settlers. Capt. Lawne soon died, and on November 30, 1620, the London Company ordered that "in regard of the late mortality of the persons transported heretofore by the late Capt. Lawne, his associates be granted till midsummer, 1625, to make up the number of persons which they were disposed to bring over." They also declared that the plantation was to be henceforth called "Isle of Wight plantation" -- a name, however, not in use till many years later. It was derived very probably from the place of residence, in England, of the principal patentees. One of them was certainly from Isle of Wight, viz., Sir Richard Worsley, probably the Richard Worley, gent., who went to Virginia in 1608. He was knighted at White Hall February 8, 1611. On November 21, 1621, Edward Bennett, a rich merchant of London, obtained a patent for a plantation conditioned on settling two hundred emigrants. His associates in the patent were his brother, Robert Bennett, and nephew, Richard Bennett, Thomas Ayres,(1) Thomas Wiseman, and Richard Wiseman. And in February, 1622, the Sea Flower arrived with one hundred and twenty settlers, headed by Capt. Ralph Hamor, one of the council; Rev. William Bennett and George Harrison, kinsmen of Edward Bennett, and connected with him in his colonization scheme. Their place of settlement was called "Warrascoyack," and sometimes "Edward Bennett's plantation." On the day this patent was awarded, Arthur Swain, Capt. Nathaniel Basse and others undertook to establish another plantation in the same neighborhood. Capt. Basse came over in person, and his plantation was known as "Basse's Choice," and was situated on Warrascoyack river.

(1) Many of the kinsmen of Thomas Ayers, doubtless, came to Virginia. In Lower Norfolk County records we learn that "John Custis married the relict of Robert Eyres, dec'd" (1652, Feb. 16), and that "Sam. Chew, of Herrington, in Maryland, Esq.," married Anne, "daughter and sole heir of William Ayres, late of Nancemond" (12 Sept., 1672). ---------- ISLE OF WIGHT COUNTY RECORDS 207 William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, Vo., 7, No. 4 Apr., 1899). pp. 205-315. ISLE OF WIGHT COUNTY RECORDS I.7 
LAND GRANT*after 1616  After 1616 at VA Nathaniel Bass acquired Basse's Choise after 1616 and before 1624 as no grant for him appears in the earliest book which begings in 1616 and he is not shown in "Ancient Planters" which ends in 1616.
Basse's Choise is located SE of Jamestown. It is shown on maps prior to the 1622 massacre, but is left off maps starting 1632. The population in 1621 was estimated at 1,200. of which 347 were killed by the Indians. 
BUSINESS*November 1617 He was in business Nov. 4-6.      184. Court Minutes of the East India Company. Letter read from the Lord Admiral in behalf of James Erwyng to be a captain ; Committee to make excuses to his Lordship. Cannon's business. No further use for Capt. Harris' services. Joshua Bainbridge to be purser in the Moon. Business of Lawrence Walldo to be heard. Hogshead of pepper to be delivered to Guy Wood's widow. 100 barrels of oil to be delivered to [Rich.] Mountney, at 56s. a barrel. Business of Peter Floris heard. Gratuity of 50l. to Wm. Ebert for his services at Patani. 50l. adventure of Nathaniel Basse in the old joint stock to be sold. Minutes of a Meeting of the Committees at Blackwall on the 25th September 1617. Nov. 6.-Employment of Lawrence Potten. Objections against Lawrence Walldo for his behaviour to Rich. Sadler at Surat, "which struck such a grief unto him as that he never recovered it, unto his dying day ;" certificates produced of his honest carriage abroad ; Ambassador Roe's unfavourable opinion of him ; the Company contented to let him have his wages and certain mace free of freight. Propositions of Richd. Fursland for employment ; intention to send him to Acheen ; Nicolls to be brought away from thence, but the manner to be left to Capt. Jourdain, to have it effected quietly, lest he might incense the King to do some mischief. Payment of Joseph Salbancke's wages. Nathaniel Martyn to have his goods upon paying freight. Grant of 200l., upon the account of the sixth voyage, to Capt. Jourdain for his services. Agreement with Giles James to serve the Company seven years, dated 25th Oct. 1617 ; also with John Jourdain to serve the Company five years, dated 5th Nov. 1617. [Five and a half pages. Court Bk., IV., pp. 52-58.] in November 1617. 
BUSINESS1618 He was in business May 19-23.      356. Court Minutes of the East India Company. Christopher Farewell's bonds for "true service" to be cancelled. There being many points unfit to be divulged in the letters from Persia which both the Spaniards and the Hollanders will be ready to take advantage of, the Committee only to be allowed to read them. Letter read from Aleppo, that the delay of Connok's previous letters was caused by his sending them by way of Marseilles; also of the danger of sending the two Arabs according to Connok's advice. Discussion whether in the letter from his Majesty to the King of Persia, the King's kindness in offering to give credit to his Majesty's subjects for 2,000 or 3,000 bales of silk, should not be acknowledged. A pinnace of 130 or 140 tons, and not to draw more than 11 feet of water and of extraordinary length, to carry good ordnance "for offence," to be built for the coast of Persia. A Committee to appear before the Privy Council concerning Sir James Cunningham's business. Request of Mrs. Walthall to sell 100l. of her husband's adventure in the first joint stock, referred. Petition of Nathaniel Basse about brokerage. Petition of divers poor men of Blackwall, Ratcliffe, and Limehouse for employment and to be relieved from the opposition of the porters of London. Petition of Eliza, wife of John Noble and a prisoner with the Turks, for payment of certain debts. The lease of Leadenhall to be sealed by the Company. May 23.-Permission to Mary Walthall to pass over 100l. of her late husband's adventure in the first joint stock to the account of Humphrey Browne. [Two pages. Court Bk., IV., 175-177.] in 1618. 
Residence*11 February 1618 He lived on 11 February 1618 at London, England; Citizen and Girdler lodging near Puddle Wharf according to Blackmansbury, Volumes 6-8. 
Anecdote1619  In 1619 at VA The first occupants of this county known to history were the
Warrascoyack Indians. Their village was seated somewhere on
Burwell's Bay, on James river, and their territory extended some
five miles along the shore and twenty miles inland. Their
fighting strength amounted to forty warriors. They were visited
by John Smith in the summer of 1608, and fourteen bushels of
corn were supplied by them to the famishing colonists at James-
town. When Smith and his party set out in December, 1608, to
visit Powhatan at Werewocomoco, on the York, they spent their
first night at Warrascoyack. Here they left Michael Sicklemore,
a valiant soldier, whom the Indian king promised to furnish with
guides to search the country about Roanoke Island for the lost
colony of Sir Walter Raleigh, and Samuel Collier, a boy, who was
to learn the Indian language. The chief warned Smith to be on
his guard against Powhatan, and acted in good faith towards
Sicklemore(1) and Collier.(2)
The first English settlement in Isle of Wight county
was begun by Capt. Christopher Lawne and his associates,
Sir Richard Worsley, knight baronet; Nathaniel Basse, gent.,
John Hobson, gent., Anthony Olevan, Richard Wiseman, Robt.
Newland, Robert Gyner, and William Wellis. On April 27,
1619, Capt. Lawne (and N. Basse) arrived in person at Jamestown, with one
hundred settlers, in a ship commanded by Capt. Evans. ...
.
On the day this patent was awarded, Arthur Swain, Capt.
Nathaniel Basse and others undertook to establish another plan-
tation in the same neighborhood. Capt. Basse came over in
person, and his plantation was known as "Basse's Choice," and
was situated on Warrascoyack river.

ISLE OF WIGHT COUNTY RECORDS 207
The houses were building, when, in March, 1622, occurred the
great massacre by the Indians. In the course of a very few hours
one-fourth of the white population perished. The mortality in
the plantations in Warrascoyack reached a total of fifty-three.
Some miraculous escapes are recorded. The Indians came to
one Baldwin's house and wounded his wife, but Baldwin, by
repeatedly firing his gun so frightened them as "to save both her,
his house, himself and divers others." At about the same time
they appeared at the house of Master Harrison, half a mile from
Baldwin's, where was staying Thomas Hamor, brother of Capt.
Ralph Hamor, who also lived near by. The Indians pretended
that they came to escort the captain to their king, who was hunt-
ing in the woods. The message was sent to the captain, but, he not
coming as they expected, they set fire to a tobacco house, and
murdered the white people as they rushed out of Harrison's
building in order to quench the flames. Many were killed, but
Thomas Hamor was saved by a chance delay. He remained to
finish a letter, which he was engaged in writing. After con-
cluding the letter, he went out, but seeing the commotion, and
receiving an arrow in his back, he returned and barricaded the
house. Then the savages set the house on fire, whereupon
Hamor, with twenty-two others, fled to Baldwin's house, leaving
their own burning.
In the meantime, Capt. Ralph Hamor was in utmost peril.
He was on his way to meet the king, who had invited him, and
came upon the savages chasing some of the whites. He returned
to his new house, where, armed with only spades, axes, and brick-
bats, he and his company defended themselves till the enemy gave
up the seige and departed. At the house of Capt. Basse, however,
in the same neighborhood, everybody was slain. Basse, who was
in England at the time, escaped. 
Immigration*27 March 1619  Nathaniel, Mary and four children arrived at Jamestown Virginia on the Marygolde commanded by Captain Evans. They immediately settled near the mouth of a creek on the south side of the James which is still known as Lawne's Creek. Captain Lawne and Ensign Washer represented the settlement known as Lawne's Plantation in the first House of Burgesses on July 30, 1619. After Lawne died on November 11, 1619, the Company instructed the remaining associates that, in order to maintain their patent, new settlers must be transported to replace those who had died. They had until midsummer 1625 to bring the census up to 200. The Company also declared that the plantation was to be henceforth known as Isle of Wight. Had this not occurred, we might still be wrestling with the many spellings of Warrosquoyacke, the former name.
Location. 37° 0.832? N, 76° 38.053? W.

Here is another account by Colonel E. M. Morrison in "Isle of Wight County, 1608-1907" (the difference in dates can be explained by the change in calendar.
The first English settlement in Isle of wight County was made by Captain Christopher Lawne and Sir Richard Worsley, knight, baronet and their associates, viz Nathaniel Basse, gentleman; John Hobson, gentleman and (husband of Nathaniel's sister); Anthony Olevan, Richard Wiseman, Robert Newland, Robert Gyner, and William willis. On April 27, 1619 they arrived at Jamestown with one hundred settlers in a ship commanded by Captain Evans. They immediately settled near the mouth of a creek on the south side of the James River still known as Lawn'e Creek. Captain Nathaniel Basse and others undertook to establish another plantation in the same neighborhood -- and his plantation was known as "Basse's Choice" and was situated on Warrosquoyacke (now Pagan) River. on 27 March 1619 Jamestown, VA
TRIP*2 April 1621  On 2 April 1621 Nathaniel Basse shipped to England on the supply ship to recruit new colonists for the plantation.4 
PATENT*21 November 1621 He wasreceived a patent Edward Bennett, a rich merchant of London, was granted a patent for a plantation upon the condition of settling two hundred immigrants. On the same day, Arthur Swaine, Nathaniel Basse and others applied for a patent to establish "Basses Choice" plantation and the patent was granted on January 30, 1622. This was a 800 acre site on the west side of the Warrosquoyacke (now Pagan) River near Smithfield, Isle of Wight County, now off State Route 10. on 21 November 1621 at VA.4
Taken from Albert Bell's book. Shows the location of Nathaniel's land.
Muster*1622  A muster(census) was taken following the Indian Massacre of 1621/22 to determine who was living and who died as a result of the attack.
Here is a list of the inventory of Basses choyse Corne 40 bushells;Pease 6 bushells;Fish 500 ct centum meaning hundred;Sows 1;Houses 2; Armes: corsletes, 4;Swords,6; Coates of Male, 7;peeces, 7; pistoles,2;petrenell, 1; Murderer, 1; powder, 12lb; lead, 300 lb. in 1622 at Basse Choise, Isle of Wight County, VA.8
AnecdoteMarch 1622  In March 1622 at VA William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, Vo., 7, No. 4 Apr., 1899. pp. 205-315. ISLE OF WIGHT COUNTY RECORDS ll
Historical Sketch
The houses were building, when, in March 22,1621/22, occurred the great massacre by the Indians. In the course of a very few hours one-fourth of the white population perished. The mortality in the plantations in Warrascoyack reached a total of fifty-three. Some miraculous escapes are recorded. The Indians came to one Baldwin's house and wounded his wife, but Baldwin, by repeatedly firing his gun so frightened them as "to save both her, his house, himself and divers others." At about the same time they appeared at the house of Master Harrison, half a mile from Baldwin's, where was staying Thomas Hamor, brother of Capt. Ralph Hamor, who also lived near by. The Indians pretended that they came to escort the captain to their king, who was hunting in the woods. The message was sent to the captain, but, he not coming as they expected, they set fire to a tobacco house, and murdered the white people as they rushed out of Harrison's building in order to quench the flames. Many were killed, but Thomas Hamor was saved by a chance delay. He remained to finish a letter, which he was engaged in writing. After concluding the letter, he went out, but seeing the commotion, and receiving an arrow in his back, he returned and barricaded the house. Then the savages set the house on fire, whereupon Hamor, with twenty-two others, fled to Baldwin's house, leaving their own burning. In the meantime, Capt. Ralph Hamor was in utmost peril. He was on his way to meet the king, who had invited him, and came upon the savages chasing some of the whites. He returned to his new house, where, armed with only spades, axes, and brick- bats, he and his company defended themselves till the enemy gave up the siege and departed. At the house of Capt. Basse, however, in the same neighborhood, everybody was slain. Basse, who was in England at the time, escaped. The consternation occasioned by the massacre was such that the determination was taken to abandon all the plantations but seven or eight, viz., Jamestown, the settlements on the opposite side of the river (in Surry), Kecaughtan, Newport News, Southampton Hundred (including Hog Island), Flowerdieu Hundred, Sherly Hundred, and the plantation of Mr. Samuel Jordan, at Jordan's Point. All Warrascoyack, from Hog Island down the river shore for fourteen miles, was abandoned. But vigorous efforts were made by the authorities to dislodge the Indians from the locality.

In the fall succeeding the massacre an expedition was sent out under the command of Sir George Yeardley against the savages down the river. He drove out the Nansemonds and Warrascoyacks, burned their houses, and took their corn. On May 21, 1623, a commission was given to Capt. Roger Smith, who had served twelve or thirteen years in the wars in the Netherlands, to erect a fort on the shore opposite to Tindall's Shoals, where Capt. Samuel Each had a block-house in building. In the summer of 1623 the governor sent companies in all directions against the Indians. Capt. William Tucker, of Kecaughtan (Hampton) (Elizabeth City), commanded the expedition against the Nansemonds and Warrascoyacks. On the same day, August 2, 1623, all of these commands fell upon the Indians, slaughtered many, cut down their corn, and burnt their houses. A week after, Capt. Tucker went down a second time against the Nansemonds. The proprietors of the abandoned settlements took heart and were allowed to return to them. The census of February 6, 1623-'24, showed as then living at "Warwicke Squeake" and "Basse's Choice" fifty-three persons; twenty-six had died "since April last." Disease, in fact, proved more destructive to the settlers than everything else combined. Four-fifths of the colonists, including the new emigrants who arrived, died from this cause in the interval between 1619 and 1625. The census of 1624-'25 showed but thirty-one persons alive at Warrascoyack and Basse's Choice. Among those who had died were Mr. Robert Bennett (brother of Edward Bennett), who had come to the colony, and the first minister, Mr. William Bennett, doubtless one of the same family. After 1625 the colony took a new and more prosperous turn, Richard Bennett and his brother, Philip Bennet, came over also to see about the interests of their uncle, Edward, and their own interests. Capt. John Hobson now arrived, and Basse, Richard Bennett and Hobson were made members of the council. In 1624 the representative from "Basse's Choice" was John Pollington. In 1629 Warrascoycak (which term came to embrace Basse's Choice and all the other settlements in the Isle of Wight) were Capt. Nathaniel Basse, Richard Bennett, Robert Savin and Thomas Jordan. In March following, they were John Upton, John Atkins, Robert Savin and Thomas Burges. In September, 1632, they were Thomas Jordan and William Hutchinson.

A 1622 passenger list for the ship "Furtherance," from London, arrived in Virginia, lists Nathaniell Basse, age 35. (This seems to support the idea that he was in England at the time of the massacre.)

Feb. 16.     2. List of names of the living in Virginia. At College Land there were 29 persons; at the Neck of Land, 41; West and Sherlow Hundred, 45; Jordan's Journey, 42; Flourdien Hundred, 63, including 11 negroes; West and Sherlow Hundred Island, 24; Chaplain's Choice, 24; James City, 182, including 3 negroes; in the Main, 88; James Island, 39, including 1 negro; the Neck of Land, 25; over the river, 33; at the plantation over against James City, 77, including 1 negro; at the Glass House, 5; Archer's Hoop, 14; Hogg Island, 31; Martin's Hundred, 24; Warwick Squeak, 33, including 4 negroes; at Indian Thicket, 11; Elizabeth City, 319, including 2 negroes; Buckrow, 30; Bass' Choice, 20; at the Eastern shore, 76. Total 1,275, including 22 negroes. Also list of names of the dead in Virginia. Total 370, including 15 "killed" and two "lost." [? Sent by Davison to Ferrar. See ante p. 43, No. 28.]9 
DEED*1623 He was named in a deed in 1623 at VA; Here appears to be the metes and bounds description of Basse's Choice. I beleive that the title Bassetts Choice is a typo. This information taken from "Direct Line Software Site.
typ patent ref VPB 7 p71 dat 23 Apr 1681 to Maj'r Tho. Taberer re 400a of high Land & Marsh Neer the Mouth of !the Pagan Creeke ! in the upper parish of the !Isle of Wight county & Comonly Called Bassetts Choice !150 part thereof being granted granted by !pattent dated unto Mr Peter Knight (Peter married Nathaniel's daughter Genevieve) in !Ao. 1640 & by the sd Knight sold & Conveyed to !Mr John Bland of London mr'ht & by Mr Giles Bland !his sonn & Attorney of the sd John Conveyed to the !said Taberer the 4th of December 1675 together !with a Confirmacon of the said Sale & a !relinquishment of Dower by Mrs Sara. Bland wife !& Genll. Attorney of the aforesd John 6 Oct 1679 !the remaineing 250 Acres being the greatest part !Marsh land Adjoyning to the former & due to the con Transportacon of 5 persons [8 listed] !The whole being thus bounded loc 118764 -46801 F127 L0 P255 pt A) at the Mouth of Palentines/Polentines swamp !wch swamp devideth the sd Taberers land from !the land of Mr James Day lm n32w; 80p; up Palentines Sw. pt B) a Locust saplin in John Mungoes line ln SW; 92P; John Mungoe pt C) a white oake Neer the head of a small Gutt lm s25w; 60p; down a small Gutt frm Neer the head pt D) Hutchins Creeke lm s; 100p; guess, dwn Hutchins Cr. pt E) & the Crosse Creeke to lm ese; 100p; guess, down Crosse Cr. pt F) the Maine pagen Creeke lm ne; 120p; by the Maine Pagen Cr. pt G) the Mouth of the sd Taberers owne Creeke lm n; 50p; guess, up Taberers Cr. pt H) & Jones hole Creeke to lm ; ; up Jones hole Cr. pt I) a Locust post in the Marsh lc N53W; 40P; fm the Marsh. 
Living*16 February 1623 He was living on 16 February 1623 at Basse Choise, VA; He had 300 acres planted at Warosquoiacke Plantation. Here is a note from Stephaun DePaul that refutes the statement. The idea that he had "300 acres planted" comes from the document mistakenly read as Nathaniel receiving an additional patent in 1626 for 300 acres of land. This was a mistake of the W&MQ that has been perpetuated. You will find the original document on my website under the "Sermon Book" link at the top. The document actually reads "Capt. Nathl. York, 300 planted" and not "Nathaniel Basse."


January.
Virginia.     35. Musters of the inhabitants of the college land in Virginia; of the neck of land in the corporation of Charles City; West and Shirley Hundred; Jordan's Journey; Chaplain's Choice and the Truelove's Company; Peirsey's Hundred; Pasbehaighs and the Maine belonging to the corporation of James City; James City and Island; of a neck of land near James City; Hog Island; Martin's Hundred; Mulberry Island; Wariscoyack; Bass's choice; Newport News; Elizabeth City; and of the Eastern shore over the Bay; taken between the 20th Jan. and 7th Feb. together with the names of the ships in which the people arrived in the colony, and a list of the provisions brought by each; also a list of the dead in the several plantations. 116 pages.10 
Census*16 February 1624 He appeared on the census of 16 February 1624; 2. List of names of the living in Virginia. At College Land there were 29 persons; at the Neck of Land, 41; West and Sherlow Hundred, 45; Jordan's Journey, 42; Flourdien Hundred, 63, including 11 negroes; West and Sherlow Hundred Island, 24; Chaplain's Choice, 24; James City, 182, including 3 negroes; in the Main, 88; James Island, 39, including 1 negro; the Neck of Land, 25; over the river, 33; at the plantation over against James City, 77, including 1 negro; at the Glass House, 5; Archer's Hoop, 14; Hogg Island, 31; Martin's Hundred, 24; Warwick Squeak, 33, including 4 negroes; at Indian Thicket, 11; Elizabeth City, 319, including 2 negroes; Buckrow, 30; Bass' Choice, 20; at the Eastern shore, 76. Total 1,275, including 22 negroes. Also list of names of the dead in Virginia. Total 370, including 15 "killed" and two "lost." [? Sent by Davison to Ferrar. See ante p. 43, No. 28.] 
ELECTION*16 February 1623/24 He was elected on 16 February 1623/24 at VA; On February 16, 1623, on May 10, 1625, and again on October 16, 1629 he was elected to the House of Burgesses for Warrosquoyacke. Basse was commissioned to hold courts in 1623, to try all cases except capital offense, and to be Justice of the Peace in 1632. He also was named Commander of Warrasquoyacke County in 1628. In 1631, he was appointed to the Governor's Council of Virginia.s in 1626.4 
Anecdote8 April 1629  On 8 April 1629 Here are some examples of the type of civil matters that Nathaniel had to wrestle with:
H[enry] R[ead] McIlwaine (1864-1934), ed, Minutes of the Council and General Court of Colonial Virginia, 1622-1632, 1670-1676, with Notes and Excerpts from Original Council and General Court Records, into 1683, Now Lost (Richmond : The Colonial Press, Everett Waddy Co., 1924).
[*193]

8 daie of Aprill Ao Dmi 1629
A CORT at James Citty the 8th daie of Aprill Ao Dmi 1629 present
John Pott Esqr Gouernor &c Capt: Smyth.
At this Court was heard a difference depending betweene Gilbert Whitfeild plt against Robte Poole defendt and it appeared that Robte Poole was indebted unto the said Gilbert in the some of 19411 of tobaccoe and nyne barrells of Eares. Whereuppon it was agreed betweene them and the cort have thought fitt that the said Robte Poole shall give security to the said Whitfeild for the paymt of the said Tobaccoe at the next cropp and to paie the Corne at or before the first of May next.
A comission was graunted unto Robte Poole to goe a trading for Corne to the Easterne Shore.
At the Cort a Controversie depending between Musick[?] William[?] and Richard Bennett[?] was . . . Concerning a granting of a leafe of Certaine land in Warrosquoaiche[?] and for that there was not witnes produced to prove anything on eyther partes the Cort hath referred the examinacon of the Contest to Capt Baffe[?] and hath retourned to same to the Gouernor and Councell at the next Quarter Cort heare holden.
George Vnwise aged thirty yeares or thereabouts sworne and exaied sayth that Dorcas Howard his maide being at worke in the grounde on Monday the two and twentieth daie of March last past, as this exaite taketh it, shee began to complaine that she was not well and being come into the howse shee fell very sick Whereuppon this dept demaunded of her what shee ayles who answered I am very ill in my body, and wished that her dame were wth her for her dame could give her ease, then this dept demaunded of her if she were wth Childe to wch she answered noe whereuppon this dept threatned to beat her if shee would not tell him the truth why she was so payned and then presently she confessesd she was wth Childe and that Robte Gage was the ffather And [then] this exaite bade her goe to bed and asked her [to] call some weomen to her, but shee intreated [that] hee would not And in the morning (the said Dorcas being in bed) this exaite demaunded of her how shee did who answered I have had a mischance, And then presently hee came to his wife and tould her of it and asked her what hee should doe who bade him goe backe and call some weomen to view the Child. Whereuppon this dept sent for one Moorecocks wife who came and looked uppon it but whether it were borne alive or deade this dept knoweth not, nor more to this matter cann hee depose.
Elizabeth Moorecocke the wife of Reiginald Moorecocke of the age of thirty yeares or thereabouts sworne and exaied sayth that George Vnwin came to this exaiats howse and tould her that her [his] maide was broughte a bed and had Carried out the Childr but had not buried it and desired this dept to come and view it whereuppon this depont went wth him and looked uppon the Childe wch was a boy, and the mould of the head was bruised, but for anyother thing this dept could perceave the Childe might bee borne alyve, and this is all this dept can depose in this matter.
This Re was continewed till March Qrter Co.
At this Cort George Vnwin planter did acknowledge to owe unto our soveraigne Lord the King 4011 soveraigne englishe wth condicon Dorcas Howard shall appeare at the Quarter Cort to Holden at James Citty
At this Cort the Church wardens of the parishe of the lower partes of Eliz Citty did present that William Capps and John Sipse parishioners there doe not repaire nor frequent the said parishe Church to hear dyvine service according to the lawes and orders of this Colony in such cases provided, It is therefore ordered that for soe long tyme as it shall be proved that the said Capps and Sipse have been absent from the said Church, that they shall pay such fines as by an actte therefor made are provided to be paid: the said fines to be levied at the next Crop by way of distresse.
The issue below became the historical novel "The Captain and Thomasine" published in 2010 by Don Floyd at Lulu.com.
[*194]
Exaicons taken before John Pott Esqr gouernor the 25th day of March Ao [1629]
ffrancis England of the age of twenty yeares or therabouts sworne and exaied faith That Thomas Hall (being exaied by Cap: Baffe wether hee were man or woeman (as himselfe did confesse to this exaite) toulde this exaite that hee answered Capt: Basse that hee was both man and woeman And this exaiate further sayth that the said Hall being at Atkins arbor one Nicholas . . . asked him why hee went in woemans aparell the said Hall answered in the hearing of this dept I goe in woemans aparell to gett a bitt for my Catt And he further sayth that there was a Rumor and Report that the said Hall did ly wth a maid of Mr Richard Rodes being at the upper plantacon after it had beene rumored that the said Hall was a man and that hee was put in mans apparell the said Hall being then there with them, the said Rodes tould Hall thou hast beene reported to bee a woman and now thou art proved to bee a man, I will see what thou carriest, Whereuppon the said Rodes laid hands uppon the said Hall, and this exaiate did soe likewise, and they threw the said Hall on his backe, and then this exaiate felt the said Hall and pulled out his members whereby it appeared that hee was a perfect man, and more hee cannot depose.
John Atkins of the age of 29 yeares or thereabouts sworne and exaied deposeth and sayth That Mr Stacy having reported that Hall now a servante unto this exaiate was as hee thought a man and woeman, not long after, the said Hall (being then servante to Robte Eyros and John Tyos) and being at Nicholas Eyros his howse Alice Longe Dorothye Rodes and Barbara Hall being at that tyme in the said howse, uppon the said Report did search the said Hall and found (as they then said) that hee was a man but the said Tyos swore the said Hall was a woeman (as the said Dorothy Rodes did often affirme unto this depot Whereuppon Cap: Basse exaied the said Hall in the presence of this depte whether hee were man or woeman, the said Hall replyed hee was both only hee had not the use of the mans parte . . . was a peece of fleshe growing at the . . . belly as bigg as the topp of his little finger [an] inch longe whereuppon Capt: Basse Commanded [him] to bee put in woemans apparell, but the aforesaid searchers were not fully resolved, but stood in doubte of what they had formerly affirmed, and being (about the twelveth of february) at this exaiates howse the said Hall dwelling then wth him, and finding the said Hall asleepe did againe search him and then allsoe found the said Hall to bee a man and at that present[ly] called this exaiate to see the proof therof, but the said Hall seeming to starre as if shee had beene awake this exaiate lefte him and at that instant Could see nothing But the Sunday following, those serchers being againe assembled and the wife of Allen Kinaston and the wife of Ambrose Griffen being in Company wth them were againe desirous to search the said Hall, and having searched him in the prnce [presence] of this Deponent did then likewise finde him to bee a man Whereuppon this exaiat asked him if that were all hee had to wch hee answered I have a peece of an hole and thereuppon this dept commanded him to lye on his backe and shew the same And the said woemen searching him againe did againe find him to bee a man Whereuppon the sd exaiate did Comaunde him to bee put into mans apparell And the day following went to Captaine Basse, and tould him that the said Hall was founde to bee a man and desired that hee might be punished for his abuse And this dept further sayth that the said Hall (as this dept hath heard) did question the said Alice Long for reporting that hee had layen wth a mayd of Mr Richard Bennetts, to wch shee answered I reported it not, but Penny [?] Tyos his man reported soe much And this is all this exaiate can say.
[*195]
Thomas Hall exaied saith that hee being borne at or neere Newcastle uppon Tyne was as hee hath beene often tould Christned by the name of Thomasine and soe was called and went Clothed in woemans apparell there untill the age ot twelve yeares at wch age the said Exaiats mother sent him to his Aunte in London and there hee lyved ten[?] ye[ares] untill Cales Accon, at wch tyme a brother of his being pressed for that service this exaiate Cut of his heire an Changed his apparell into the fashion of man and went over as a souldier in the Isle of Ree bing in the habit of a man, from whence when he was retorned hee came to Plymouth, and there hee changed himselfe into woemans apparell and made bone lace and did other worke wth his needle, and shortly after Shipping being ready for a voyage into this Country hee Changed againe his apparell into the habit of a man and soe came over into this Country.
It was thereuppon at this Cort ordered that it shall be published in the plantacon where the said Hall lyveth that hee is a man and a woeman, that all the Inhabitants there may take notice thereof and that hee shall goe Clothed in mans apparell, only his head to bee attired in a Coyfe and Croscloth[?] wth an Apron before him And that hee shall finde suerties for his good behavior from Quarter Cort to Quarter Cort untill the Cort shall dischardge him and Capt Nathaniel Basse is ordered to see this order executed accordingly.
ffor as much as Edward Waller did at this Cort comence his suit against John Johnson about the sale of a sowe and the taking away of a peece, and because Johnson testified to this Cort that hee sent a pigg in parte of satisfaccon and the peece by Richard Dolphenby to the said Edward Waller the wch the said Waller affirmed hee never receaved And for that the said Mr Waller hath dyvers wintesses to examine in this Cause wch at this Cort were not present It is ordered that the Captain Smyth shall examine the said Dolphenby uppon his oath Concerning the same, and the Cause is referred to bee determined at the next Quarter Cort
It is ordered that every comaunder wthin the severall plantacons of this Colony shall take a generall muster of all the inhabitants men woemen and Children as well Englishe as Negroes inhabiting wthin the same and Retorne a lift of their names to the Governor and Councell at the next Quarter Cort to bee here holden.
John Virgo being bound by Recognizance to appear this Cort hath made default whereby hee hath forfe[yted] to the Kings Matie 40li sterling.
Charles Waller beeing bound by Recognizance to appear at this Cort hath made defaulte whereby hee hath forfeyted 401i sterling to the Kings Matie


. 
Anecdote*1631  In 1631 In 1631 Nathaniel was sent to New England to try to entice settlers to come to the warmer climate of Virginia. After this he does not appear in records. Possibly he returned to England, possibly the records are lost. Interestingly though, there was an earlier Bass in New England who married an Alden of the John Alden family. I find it interesting that a number of southern Bass families chose to name a son "Alden". Possibly there is a connection here that has yet to be discovered. MVW Nov. 1999.
His plantation Basse Choice disappears from the maps of 1632. Possibly he sold the land. However, there are several mentions of people receiving land in 1639 and 1642 with the description of their land as "adjoining or near the land of Captain Bass.
Note too that some of the Basse family may have been either settlers to or traders with the Carribean Islands - possibly Barbados.
Here is another note on the topic:
On 6 Mar 1631/32 Nathaniel was commissioned to "trade between 34 and 40 N Latitude, England, Nova Scotia and West Indies to invite inhabitants hither". (If they were tired of cold and damp!) Nathaniel was also commissioned to trade to the Dutch Plantation and Canada. He was given power of Justice of Peace. (Virginia Council & General Court Records 1626-1634)

Dec. 20 1631Dec. 20.
James City. [Virginia.]     34. Accord between the Governor and Council of Virginia; concluding and silencing by a peaceable period all those "unhappy differences which have interrupted all good proceedings" for the benefit of the plantation. Signed by Sir John Harvey, Fras. West, Sam. Mathews, Wil. Claybourne, Wil. Tucker, Wil. Ferrar, Hen. Finch, Nath. Basse, John Utie, Thos. Purvisse, Hugh Bullock, and Wil. Peirce. [Copy.]11 
Living20 April 1641 He was living on 20 April 1641 at VA; Evidently Nathaniel was still living in 1641 as a land grant to Thomas Morrey says that the Morrey land adjoins that of Captain Nathaniel Basse.12 
COURT1 July 1643 He were involved in a court proceeding on 1 July 1643 Ordered, That Mr. Alexander Hampden shall have Leave to go to Captain Basse's House at Hackney (outside London), for the Recovery of his Health: And that Captain Basse do take care, that his Keepers be continually with him.13 
COURT*30 August 1655  On 30 August 1655 at England a deposition was taken in London. It is a highly controversial document. MVW ordered an original and below is a transcription copied from the original located in the Corporation of London Records Office filed in the Mayor's Court Deposition Box 5
The 30th day of August 1654/55

"Major Edward Basse citizen & mercer of London aged sixty years or thereabouts, & Dame Mary Poole the wife of Sir John Poole of Bromley in the county of Middlesex Barronett (written over the word knight which is crossed out) aged 57 years or thereabouts sworn & examined at the instance & request of Hester Hobson of Bromley aforesaid widow, Abigail Thorpe of Chissell Hampton in the county of London widow and Thomas Hastler citizen & barber surgeon of London and Sarah his wife Depose & say upon their corporal oaths Severally that the said Hester Hobson Abigail Thorpe & Sarah Hastler were are are the sisters & coheirs of Luke Basse who died a bachelor (written over the word unmarried which is crossed out) & was late brother & heir of Nathaniel Basse their brother also of the whole blood lately also deceased in Virginea without issue as these deponents have understood: And that the said sisters & deceased brother were all of them the legitimate children of Humphrey Basse of London merchant & Mary his wife long since deceased And that no brother or other sister (than the three before named) of the said deceased brother are now surviving The said deponents giving for reason of their knowledge in the premises that they had long acquaintance with the said parents & children and much & familiar conversation with them.
Sworn in court Ed: Basse, Mary Pole

And we the said London Mayor & Aldermen do further certify that the said Hester Hobson & Abigail Thorpe present in court did declare that they have appointed their said brother-in-law Thomas Hastler their true and loyal attorney to recover & receive all estate real and personal due or accruing unto them as heirs of the aforesaid brother or otherwise after their decease in Virginea, and for such further end & purposes as in & by their letter of attorney hereunto annexed is more fully mentioned and expressed."

Note: that there has been an enornous amount of speculation about this document. I personally believe that it was either falsely sworn or is being misinterpreted due to lack of punctuation. MVW 2-02.

Here are my (MVW) thoughts: One can read it as saying that Luke the bachelor was without issue. After all the deposition was for the heirs to secure property from Luke and they were testifying that he left no heirs. The part about his brother already deceased was only to identify Luke with certanty. In 1659/60 the General Assembly of Virginia ordered William Drummond as agent of "the coheirs of Basse" to pay a sum to Tehdorick Bland of Westover for some suit affecting the Basse land.

The continuing controversy over the lineage of Nathaniel Bass and the veracity of the Albert D. Bell Book “Bass Families of the South” has caused me to try to define the problems and look for possible answers. I do this for my own understanding and offer it to others for consideration. I welcome definitive challenges to my suggestions as long as they are substantiated by more than simple allegations. Let me define the problems I see:

What do we make of the August 30th 1654 deposition by Major Edward Basse age sixty and Dame Mary Poole regarding the whereabouts of Nathaniel Bass at the time of their brother Luke’s death?
When and how did the name “Keziah” enter into the Bass family?
What do current researchers say about the Basse family?

First, lets examine the 1654 deposition. I read a transcript of the deposition in the NITA (Nansemond Indian Tribal Association) booklet, but just to be certain I ordered an original copy from the London Records Office. The NITA transcript is accurate however lack of punctuation can alter the meaning. One sentence of the deposition troubled me. The deponents, Maj. Edward Bass age 60 and Dame Mary Poole age 57 are testifying that three sisters of Nathaniel and Luke Bass (Hester, Abigail and Sarah) are the sole living heirs of Luke and therefore entitled to his estate. The sisters are represented by Sarah’s husband, Thomas Hastler as their attorney “to recover and receive all estate real and personal due or accruing unto them as heirs of the aforesaid brother or otherwise after their decease in Virginia…”

The deposition is valid up through the point where Major Edward Bass and Dame Mary Poole declare that they know the three sisters as well as the family and testify “that they are the sisters and coheirs of Luke Basse who died a bachelor”.

The deposition dissolves into hearsay with the next phrase that states: “and was late brother and heir of Nathaniel Basse their brother also of the whole blood lately also deceased in Virginea without issue as these deponents have understood”. I am troubled by the phrase “without issue as these deponents have understood.” It does not say they knew it for a fact from their own knowledge, but merely that they “understood” it. Understood from whom? Unless I know something for sure I can only offer hearsay evidence that someone else told me.

If the sisters were seeking to get clear title to the estate of their brother Luke they certainly had a big interest in making sure that the deponents Major Edward Basse and Dame Mary Poole “understood” that the only threat to their claim, namely their “lately also deceased in Virginia brother Nathaniel” left no heirs to challenge them.

Think for a moment what you might say in the circumstances. You need clear title, the people who might challenge your claim are far away and you are asked what you know. How simple just to say “best we know there are no other heirs”. Its not a lie, but its also not first hand knowledge. I think that is exactly what happened.

Nathaniel was buried in London just six weeks before the deposition. He would have been about sixty four at the time of his death. By then his heirs and any family that he left in Virginia were grown and scattered and probably had no contact with England, and even if they did how could they possibly afford the time or money to bring a lawsuit?

For whatever reason, Nathaniel had returned to London late in life and died and was buried there. Then his brother Luke died leaving only the three women one of whom had a husband to represent the group, and they seek to get clear title to Luke’s estate by declaring that Nathaniel had no issue. Clean as a hounds tooth!

Where is either Luke’s or Nathaniel’s will? Perhaps finding one would clarify the situation. Until such time I suspect the deposition was an expeditious way of clearing title.

Much has been made about the name Keziah relative to Nathaniel’s son John. It is quite true that the John Bass sermon book does not use the word Keziah in connection with John’s wife, Elizabeth. BUT, page 12 of Albert D. Bell’s book “Bass Families of the South” says, “Keziah Basse belouved wife of John Basse departed this life the 4 days of Xber in the Yeare of our Blessed Lord and Savr 1676. Elsewhere on the same page is:John Basse marrid Keziah Elizabeth Tucker daughter of Robin the Elder of ye Nansimuns kingdom…” Where did Bell get this information and where is it now?

Page four of Dr. Bell’s book states “I visited the late Jesse L. Bass, chief of the Nansemonds, at his home in the Portsmouth General Hospital where he passed away in 1960 at the age of 85…his mind and memory were clear. Without his help it would have been almost impossible to find the answers to many questions that had puzzled me. Because he was sympathetic, various members of the Bass families of Norfork County (and their relatives of other names) allowed me to copy their precious ancient family documents containing important information that is not available elsewhere. (pp 11-16) of this section.”

The various papers were and perhaps still are with family members. Bell saw them and recorded them without comment. He had no reason to lie or fabricate. The name Keziah which by the way persisted in the Georgia branch of the family into the mid 1800’s was legitimately taken from Bass family papers.

Were there two sermon books? I do not think so. I believe there was one sermon book and “A Holy Bible bound with the Book of Common Prayer 1725 that was recently in the possession of Justin Bass of the Yadkin community.” As Dr. Bell recorded in his book. Fortunately Dr. Bell saw these and numerous other records recorded on “loose papers – brittle and faded” and made a record. Where are the originals today? Likely they are stashed in the attic or archives of a descendant living in the Smithfield area.

Recent authors (1993) have opined on the Basse family. The following is taken from “Historic Isle of Wight” by King:: “By 1631 Nathaniel Basse left Virginia on a mission to seek settlers from New England. For a long time his disappearance from the Virginia scene was a mystery; now we know he returned to England where he died on July 3, 1654/55.” And, on page nine of the same book we find: “The Bible (obtained by Oliver Perry) documented the 1638 marriage of Englishman John Basse to Keziah Elizabeth Tucker.” (Remember, there is both a Bible as well as a Sermon book.)

For me, the preponderance of the evidence points to Nathaniel Basse son of Humphrey and father of John married to Keziah Elizabeth as our connection with history, the Indians and the merchant Basse family of London. Prove me wrong by finding a will, letter of administration etc. for Nathaniel or Luke. Until then I find it a bit amusing to think of the three sisters and the attorney husband being clever enough to get clear title to Luke’s estate through the use of a deposition containing the nebulous phrase “without issue as these deponents have understood” or in today’s parlence –“Well, if you say so…”

May 2008 - I am now absolute positive that the Nathaniel Basse in Virginia is in fact only one person and he is our ancestor. Boyd's Inhabitants of London and Boyd's Family Units states: "Nathaniel, son of Humphry Basse, went to Virginia where some of his children settled. It is believed he returned to England." Stephaune Paul points out that Boyd's is a modern compilation of records which is true however there is a statement that supports this record. In addition a statement dated May 17 1797 regarding a William Basse (which William is unknown) states that "all the Basses of this county descent from Captain Nathaniell Basse, as satifactorally proved by the records preserved." Test William Portlock. A copy is at the North Carolina State Archives (which makes one think that above William left Virginia for North Carolina).14,15 
Anecdote1659  In 1659 at VA Historical Sketch:
Soon after Virginia yielded to the authority of the Parliament, the two representatives from the Isle of Wight, John Hammond and James Pyland, were expelled from the House of Burgesses -- the one because of his "scandalous" character, and "being a frequent disturber of the peace of the country," and the other because of his "abetting Thomas Woodward," a noted loyalist, in his "mutinous and rebellious declaration" against the Parliament. John Hammond, really a fine character, removed to Maryland, where he was a friend of Lord Baltimore, and was the author of "Leah and Rachell," a most interesting tract on the relations of Virginia and Maryland. Woodward, for whom Pyland suffered, had been assay-master of the mint to Charles I., patented in Isle of Wight and in 1665 was appointed the first surveyor of the Province of North Carolina. He appears to have had at least two sons, John Woodward, who died in England, and Thomas, of Virginia.
In 1667, the fleet of merchant ships from Bristol, which traded with the Southside, was suddenly attacked at the mouth of the Elizabeth river by four Dutch men of war, and twenty of the vessels were destroyed. The damage would have been greater, had not Major-General Bennett, in command of the Southside counties, arrived on the scene, and driven off the invaders. In 1671, the Dutch came again, with further disastrous results, to the Bristol ships, which, however, were revenged in the end in the seizure of New York by the English. In Bacon's Rebellion (1676) Isle of Wight was the scene of constant foray. Col. Joseph Bridger(1) headed the followers of Berkeley, and John Jennings, clerk of the court, was the most noted of Bacon's adherents. He was banished from the colony. but died before the decree could be carried into effect. Among the interesting places, the plantation of Edward Bennett deserves notice. His personal share of land appears to have been fifteen hundred acres of land, and by a deed recorded in the secretary's office, dated April 8, 1663, this land was divided between his daughters, Silvestra, the wife of Major Nicholas Hill, and Mary, the wife of Thomas Bland. Silvestra's share was the upper moiety, and began at a locust post on the river side, and ran for length three hundred and twenty poles southwest into the woods, and for breadth three hundred and seventy-five poles up the river to a marked tree in a valley near a place called "The Rocks" (still known as such). Mary's share was the lower moiety. It began at the locust post on the river side, ran down the river by Felgate's Island, and bounded on Pollington's Point (Day's Point?), three lines of Peter Hull's land to a branch of Hutchinson's Creek. Maj. Hill, in 1674, left this land to his son, George Hill, after the death of his wife, Silvestra. Silvestra Hill by her will left 550 acres of this land to Mary Baker, wife of Major Henry Baker. Col. Nathaniel Bacon, Sen., had a plantation near by, which fell to his heiress, Abigail Smith, who married Major Lewis Burwell, of Gloucester county. By degrees the Burwells absorbed much of the land in the neighborhood. In the Virginia Gazette, about the latter part of the last century, is an advertisement, which describes the Burwell estate as "ten miles below Hog Island, containing thirty-five hundred acres, whereon are three plantations, cleared and in good order for cropping, sufficient to work thirty-five hands. On the Manor plantation is a handsome brick house, sixty by twenty-six feet, two stories high, well finished and wainscoated, with two brick houses forty feet by twenty, barns, stables and every other necessary house, a handsome garden completely laid off, a hundred and five yards by seventy- five. On the three plantations there are about seventeen hundred apple trees, and a great variety of other fruit.

Near the said land is a tract containing eighty-five acres, with a well-accustomed mill thereon, and as fine a stream as any in Virginia". "Basse's Choice" originally called for three hundred acres, but its acreage was really four hundred, of which two hundred and fifty acres was marsh land. Mr. Peter Knight, who may have married one of Basse's daughters, patented one hundred and fifty acres of the same in 1640, and two hundred and fifty-five in 1643. It was situated on the east side of Pagan Bay. Peter Knight sold the tract to John Bland, the eminent London merchant, and in 1659-'60 the General Assembly ordered Mr. William Drummond as agent of "the coheirs of Basse" to pay Theodorick Bland, of Westover, brother and agent of John Bland, twenty-five hundred pounds of tobacco damages awarded in some suit probably affecting this land.
(1) Sir John Berry names among the eminent sufferers by Bacon's Rebellion Col. Joseph Bridger, "a very Resolute gentleman, who, though forced to fly in the heat of war from his own countrie, yet on his Return was very Active and Instrumental in reducing to their obedience the South part of James River," &c. William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine,
Vo., 7, No. 4 Apr., 1899. pp. 205-315.
ISLE OF WIGHT COUNTY RECORDS V. 
COURT1659 He were involved in a court proceeding on 1659 at VA The General Assembly ordered Mr. William Drummond as agent of the co-heirs of Basse to pay to Theodorick Bland of Westover, brother and agent of John Bland, 2500 lbs. of tobacco, dowages awareded in same suit affecting the land. n In 1675 Giles Bland, son and agent of John bland, sold Basses Choice to Maj. John Taberer. Sarah Bland, wife of John, relinquished her dower.
Note from MVW - this should put to rest forever the notion that Nathaniel Basse left no heirs as the Nansemond Indians would have us believe.16 
Biography*1999  Nathaniel Basse was active in the early years of English settlement. Basse's Choice was one of the first three settlements in Isle of Wight County and was probably the first to hold a court. Colonel Morrison tells us that Basse was in England at the time of the great massacre and, of course, escaped being killed along with all the others in his house. He returned from England in 1622 and lived on his grant. Records show that he held court on his plantation in 1626 and represented it in the House of Burgesses in 1629. In 1631 he was sent on a mission to New England to seek colonists for Virginia. His name is not mentioned again in local records after he left on the mission to New England.

Here is a brief history that is interesting:
It is believed that Nathaniel Basse brought his children back to London after the 1622 Indian Massacre; however, Nathaniel continued making trips to the colonies.
The first English settlement in the area known by the Indians as Warrosquoake (Isle of Wight Co., Virginia) was made by Captain Christoper Lawne, Sir Richard Worsley, Knight & Baronet, and their associates NATHANIEL BASSE, Gentleman, John Hobson, Gentleman, Anthony Olevan, Richard Wiseman, Robert Newland, Robert Gyner and William Willis.
They arrived at Jamestown with one hundred settlers on 27 April 1619 in a ship commanded by Captain Evans. They immediately settled on the south side of the Warrosquoake River (James River) and established the plantation "Warrosquoake", to be known as "Lawne's Creek". When their patent was confirmed it was to become known as the "County of Isle of Wight".

NATHANIEL BASSE and others undertook to establish another plantation in the same neighborhood, to the east, known as "Basse's Choice" situated on the Warrosquoake River (James River) and Pagan Creek. His patent was received 21 Nov 1621 for 300 acres plus 100 acres of marshland. The houses on Captain Basse's plantation were being built when at midday on 22 Mar 1622/23, (note this was not Good Friday as many sources say. The discrepancy came about because of the double dates.) the Indians attacked the settlers killing 347 of the 1240 English inhabitants in the 80 settlements on the north and south sides of the river (James) 26 at Isle of Wight were among those killed. The settlers made a valiant defense of themselves with guns, axes, spades and brickbats. Nathaniel and his wife, Mary, were in England at the time, and some of the children were at "Basse's Choice" with a nurse. The story is told that five-year old JOHN was one of the children that escaped and was rescued by some friendly Nansemond Indians! A 1622 passenger list for the ship "Furtherance," from London, arrived in Virginia, lists Nathaniell Basse, age 35. (Many ships at that time considered passengers as cargo and did not list their names. Some ships listed the names of the men on board but did not list women and children.)

A census taken 16 Feb 1623/24 shows a total of 53 persons living at "Worwicke-Squeak" and "Basse's Choice". Nathaniel Basse and Samuell Basse were among those listed. Capt. Nathaniel Basse, Samuel Basse and William Basse are also found living among the list of 1,033 Early Pioneers of 1624. They are listed as living at Basse Choise, sndx no. B200.
Nathaniel was appointed to the House of Burgesses at the first Legislative Assembly representing Warrosquoake (Isle of Wight) for 1623/24. He was again a member of the House of Burgesses in Oct 1629 and 1631, appointed to Harvey's Council 1631/32 and a member of the Great Council 1631/32. On 6 Mar 1631/32 Nathaniel was commissioned to "trade between 34 and 40 N Latitude, England, Nova Scotia and West Indies to invite inhabitants hither". (If they were tired of cold and damp!) Nathaniel was also commissioned to trade to the Dutch Plantation and Canada. He was given power of Justice of Peace. (Virginia Council & General Court Records 1626-1634)
Basse's Choice originally called for 300 acres but its acreage was closer to 400.

Mr. Peter Knight married to Nathaniel's daughter Genevieve, patented 150 acres of the same in 1640 and 255 acres in 1643. Peter Knight sold the tract to John Bland, an eminent London Merchant.
Nathaniel Basse was buried 3 July 1654 in the Church of St. Alphage, Cripplegate, London. Mary, his wife, had died 17 Jan 1630, with the birth of a stillborn son. After Nathaniel's death in 1654, the General Assembly of Virginia in 1659/60 ordered Mr. Wm. Drummond as agent of the Co-heirs of Nathaniel Basse to pay to Theodorick Bland of Westover, 2500 lbs tobacco in settlement of a suit affecting the land. (This statement should once and for all put to rest the concept that Nathaniel Bass had no heirs.)
Pp. 545-552, (March, 1659-60---11th of Commonwealth) WHEREAS Mr. Theodorick Bland petitioned...for damages in a case...against Mr.William Dromond who was attornie of the Coheires of Basse...
http://vintagegold.topcities.com/knight1.html.17 

Family

Mary Jordan b. 1591, d. 1630
MARRIAGE*21 May 1613 He married Mary Jordan on 21 May 1613 at London, England.2,4,5 
Children
Last Edited2 Mar 2015

Citations

  1. This is a test.
  2. [S527] Colonial Ancestors.
  3. [S522] International Genealogical Index (IGI), Source Information: Batch No.: Dates: Source Call No.: Type: Printout Call No.: Type: C022342 1571 - 1709 0394830 Film 6903690 Film.
  4. [S547] Fred Harvey Williiams, "Basse Family," e-mail to Margot Woodrough, Feb 2004.
  5. [S635] Unknown compiler, "NC State Archives", Ancestral File.
  6. [S486] Donald Floyd, "Donald Floyd."
  7. [S571] "William and Mary," Various.
  8. [S529] Adventurers of Purse, p. 39 Lists Nathaniell Basse aged 35 who came on the Furtherance in 1622 (note this was not his first voyage).
  9. [S460] Basse Sermon Book.
  10. [S528] Hotten, Original Lists of Persons of Quality - 1600 to 1700.
  11. [S530] Abstracts of Virginia.
  12. [S477] John Bennett Boddie, 17th Century Isle of Wight.
  13. [S629] Unknown subject unknown record type, by unknown photographer.
  14. [S568] "Isle of Wight Records", P. 215.
  15. [S610] Boyd, Boyd's.
  16. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.
  17. [S461] Helen Haverty King, Isle of Wight.

Nathaniel Basse

M, #2298, b. 29 May 1640, d. 30 December 1652
Father*John Basse Sr. b. 7 Sep 1616, d. 2 Apr 1699
Mother*Elizabeth Keziah Tucker b. c 1624, d. 4 Dec 1676
Relationships9th great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
9th great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*29 May 1640 Nathaniel Basse was born on 29 May 1640 at VA.1 
 He was the son of John Basse Sr. and Elizabeth Keziah Tucker
Death*30 December 1652 He died on 30 December 1652 at VA at age 12.1 
Last Edited30 Nov 1999

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Richard Basse

M, #2271, b. 30 October 1591
Father*Humphrey Basse b. c 1564, d. 4 Jun 1616
Mother*Mary Buscher b. c 1568, d. 1616
Relationships11th great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
11th great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Christening*30 October 1591 Richard Basse was christened on 30 October 1591 at London, England.1,2 
 He was the son of Humphrey Basse and Mary Buscher
BUSINESS*September 1617 He was in business Resolution to sell the Jambi pepper at 26d., the Bantam pepper at 25d., and as many other commodities as may be. Request of Mr. Leske, the preacher, to have his goods delivered to him free of freight ; some condemned him as worthy of no kindness, seeing he was, as it is said, sent home as a malefactor ; others supposed he was wronged because of his severe reprehension of sin in others who sought to injure him "by putting a trick upon him by a wench at the English house ;" resolved in respect of his coat to deal kindly with him and leave it to the Governor to remit the freight as a favour.

Wages of Joseph Salbancke; his desire to write 200l. in the last joint stock, referred. Petition of John Curtis, master of the Peppercorn, "craving favour" for his goods brought home, referred, as it was conceived a great wrong to bring such a quantity of spices home, contrary to his bond.
Committee appointed to frame proceedings for commissions, letters, number of ships, men, provisions, and the like for the next year's fleet. Committee to speak with Slanye, respecting the purchase of six or seven tons of elephants' teeth. Sept. 23.-Minutes of a General Court.

Those of the generality absent to be fined 12d. each. Resolutions concerning the sale of the spices and other goods brought home by the Globe and Peppercorn. 250l. of Luke Walthall in the first joint stock "put to sale," adjudged to Robert Delean, he bidding 212l. per cent. for the same ; also 40l. belonging to Rich. Basse, sold to Wm. Preistley for 85l; 300l. of John Wightman to Rowland Backhouse, for 218l. per cent; 400l. of Anna Walthall, half to [Hugh] Hamersley for 210l. per cent., and half to Robt. Delean for 210l. 10s. per cent; 400l. of Edw. Dodsworth, half to Rowland Backhouse for 210l. 10s., and half to [John] Bancks for 210l. per cent; and 400l. of John Walthall, half to Rich. Venne, and half to Wm. Cockes for 210l. per cent. each ; and 200l. to Arthur Robinson. Sale of commodities with names of purchasers and the prices. Sept. 25.-In the case of the "rulers" of the porters, Robert Pore is enjoined to submit. Demand of Barrett referred. Difference between Martyn and the "Caldæan," referred.

Consideration of the number of ships to be employed in the next fleet. To be at Bantam to command the factories in the Indies, and to examine, establish, and dissolve factories as there may be occasion in the next fleet, their tonnage, the places they should go to, and the stock they should carry ; some of opinion to send eight ships,-two to Surat and six to Bantam, one from Surat to go to Acheen and Bantam ; those from Bantam to go to the Moluccas and parts thereabouts, that the Dutch may perceive the English intend not to leave [off] their traffic to those places ; and by such strength the inhabitants there and at Banda will be encouraged to deal with the English when they shall find them of power to resist the wrongs put on them by the Hollanders.
After discussion, it was held fit to send the more shipping, not to oppose the Hollanders in hostile manner, but to countenance the Company's business, that they be not put down or forced from their trade, "which, it seems, they (the Hollanders) do intend in all parts," but to send a good strength, both to the Moluccas and Banda, to purpose once for all and see what the Hollanders will do, "if a man of courage may be had that will not endure their wrongs ; as yet, they have only given hard words, but performed no deeds, and the Company's intents have been and still will be, not to drive a war with them, but to defend and resist the wrongs that may be put upon the English." Opinion that it were fit for the English to attempt Banda, and endeavour to expulse the Flemings, where the country people will assist, hating the insolency of the Flemings.
Resolved to have, first Mr. Jourdain's, then Capt. Keeling's opinions, and then both together ; to hear also Augustine Spaldinge, Capt. Saris, Mr. Paiton, and others. Opinion of Jourdain on prosecuting the trade in the Indies, and dissolving unprofitable factories ; that Jourdain would be a fit person [for that service]. Description of the alterations and additions to be made in the several departments of the Company's premises at Blackwall ; these include the repacking and slaughter rooms.
Sept. 26.-Complaints of Deane concerning his "half capital," of divers grocers regarding the purchase of pepper, and of other members of the Company who could not have their half capitals. in September 1617.3 
BUSINESS13 November 1656 He was in business Nov. 13.     18. Petition of Nicholas Blake, Nicholas Juxon, and Rich. Basse, merchants and part owners of the Friendship, to the Lord Protector and Council. Have sundry plantations belonging to them in Barbadoes, which greatly need working horses. Pray for a licence to transport 30. Endorsed, "Ref. 13 Nov. Ord. 18 Nov. 1656." on 13 November 1656.4 
Last Edited17 Mar 2011

Citations

  1. [S545] Stephaun Paul, Feb 5 2004.
  2. [S610] Boyd, Boyd's.
  3. [S629] Unknown subject unknown record type, by unknown photographer.
  4. [S629] Unknown subject unknown record type, by unknown photographer, 'America and West Indies: November 1656', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 1: 1574-1660 (1860), pp. 450-452. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx

Richard Basse

M, #2284, b. 1625
Father*Nathaniel Basse b. 19 Dec 1589, d. 1655
Mother*Mary Jordan b. 1591, d. 1630
Relationships10th great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
10th great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*1625 Richard Basse was born in 1625.1 
 He was the son of Nathaniel Basse and Mary Jordan
Anecdote1651  In 1651 Feb 28 Depositions re bond given by Francis Norton of Charles Town, New England, merchant to John Hart and Richard Basse of London merchants. "Complete Book of Immigrants" Coldham. 
Anecdote1656  In 1656 Petition of Nicholas Blake, Nicholas Juxon and Richard Basse part owners of the "Friendship", that they may transport horses to their plantation in Barbados. See "Complete Book of Immigrants" by Coldham. Do not know if this is same Richard, but could easily be. 
Anecdote1660  In 1660 April 11 Deposition on behalf of John Hart and Richard Basse, merchants of London re bond between John Allen and Richard Basse of New England to deliver Virginia fish in 1650 to Hart. Found in "Complete Book of Immigrants" not sure if it is this same Richard, but could easily be. 
Last Edited26 Sep 2009

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Richard Basse

M, #2295, b. 2 August 1658, d. 26 December 1722
Father*John Basse Sr. b. 7 Sep 1616, d. 2 Apr 1699
Mother*Elizabeth Keziah Tucker b. c 1624, d. 4 Dec 1676
Relationships9th great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
9th great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*2 August 1658 Richard Basse was born on 2 August 1658 at Nansemond Kingdom.1 
 He was the son of John Basse Sr. and Elizabeth Keziah Tucker
MARRIAGE*6 November 1680 He married Jane Bryant on 6 November 1680.1 
MARRIAGE*25 August 1695 He married Mary Burwell on 25 August 1695 at VA.1 
Death*26 December 1722 He died on 26 December 1722 at Nansemond at age 64 William Rudd, Clergyman of the Parish of Elizabeth River Church, stated "These are peaceful subjects of His Majesty George I, King and defender of he faith, numbered among ye Nansiemum people, freeborn, and worthy of ye respecfull consideration of Christians in ye Church in Carolina as in Virginia and intitled to the same." Note - Evidently the Basse family was preparing to move south to North Carolina. It was the custom to be released from one Parish so that they could transfer to the Parish church in the new area.1 
Anecdote*between 1722 and 1727  Between 1722 and 1727 The Nansemonds split into two parts in the mid-seventeenth century. The nonreservation Christianized Nansemonds continued to live on the Nansemond River in Virginia until either the late 17th or early 18th ceentury. Then, family by family, they withdrew southeast into the back country of Norfolk County on the northern edge of the Great Dismal Swamp. There they went on living quietly throughout the 18th century, keeping a Nansemond identity and living by hunting and farming on a small scale. However, the Indian identity of these people and later, their distant Indian ancestry made some of their English neighbors unwilling to respect their citizenship. Therefore, sometime between 1722 and 1727 the children of Richard Bass in Norfolk County Virginia had the clerk of court write a certificate for them, reciting their ancestry and stating that "these are Peaceful Subjects of His Maitie George I...numbered among ye Nansiemum People, freeborn, and worthie of ye Respecfull Consideracon of Christians in ye Church in Carolina as in Virginia."2 

Family 1

Jane Bryant b. 17 December 1665, d. 14 February 1689/90
Children

Family 2

Mary Burwell
Children
Last Edited21 Apr 2006

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.
  2. [S461] Helen Haverty King, Isle of Wight.

Richard Basse1

M, #2915, b. circa 1730, d. circa 1792
Father*Andrew Basse Sr.1 b. 9 Jun 1698, d. Mar 1770
Mother*Elizabeth Smith1 b. c 1715
Relationships2nd cousin 9 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
2nd cousin 9 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
MARRIAGE* Richard Basse married Sarah (?) Record says they might have married in Johnston Co., NC.1 
Birth*circa 1730 He was born circa 1730 at Craven, NC.1 
 He was the son of Andrew Basse Sr. and Elizabeth Smith.1 
Death*circa 1792 He died circa 1792 at Wayne, NC.1 

Family

Sarah (?)
Children
Last Edited1 Dec 1999

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Richard Basse

M, #2931, d. circa 1897
Father*Edward Basse b. c 1762, d. c 1802
Mother*Sarah Farmer
Relationships4th cousin 7 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
4th cousin 7 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
 Richard Basse was the son of Edward Basse and Sarah Farmer
Death*circa 1897 He died circa 1897 at TN
Last Edited1 Dec 1999

Richard Basse1

M, #2943
Father*John Basse1 d. bt 1820 - 1821
Relationships5th cousin 6 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
5th cousin 6 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
 Richard Basse was the son of John Basse.1 
Last Edited1 Dec 1999

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Richard Basse

M, #4500
Father*William Basse b. c 1522
Mother*Mary Carkin b. c 1520, d. 1542
Relationships12th great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
12th great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
 Richard Basse was the son of William Basse and Mary Carkin
Note*1616 He He is mentioned in Humphrey Basses' will as "my bretheren along with a Robert Basse" Will is ambiguous. Possibly both Robert and Richard are dead. in 1616. 
Last Edited20 Jun 2006

Richard Basse Jr.

M, #2905, b. 24 June 1707
Father*Richard Basse b. 2 Aug 1658, d. 26 Dec 1722
Mother*Mary Burwell
Relationships1st cousin 10 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
1st cousin 10 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
Birth*24 June 1707 Richard Basse Jr. was born on 24 June 1707 at Norfolk, VA
 He was the son of Richard Basse and Mary Burwell
Note* He Hiyas Margo!
I really *shouldn't* post to people when I have been studing into the early morning hours. I do tend to ramble when it gets past midnight. As best I can I will key in what I have from the death of Humphrey Basse to present on my end. I do not have records of all the children - only the one who made our family line - sorries. I know my Auntie would have this information but I asked only for "my family history - descendants to myself" - what I can fill in I will (from my chart orother family records). And I can get other information about all (or many)children of ancestors - butmy Auntie is ill and it may take me a few weeks before she isable to help me. 

Humphrey Basse - born about 1564 in France-died in Middlesex, London1616 . He
was married to Mary Buschier about 1587who diedthe 22 of July 1616.
He was known as "The Immigrant" as they came from France. They had a
son named Nathaniell (or Nathaniel as US records show)

Nathanie(l)l Basse -born 29 of December 1589 in London. He died the 3rd of July 1654. He was
married 21 of May 1615 in London to Mary Jordan (who died the 17th of Jan.
 1630). They were of the "gentry" class (I can explain the "class" system of
UK at this time period if needed for background in a later e-mail). They had
 a son - John Basse (other children not on *my* list as I only asked forthe
line from my maternal grandfather back but I can get this information if you
 need it)

John Basse - born 7th of December in 1616, London England, and he died the 2cd of April
 1699 in Norfolk, Virginia (however UK records state they have record he died
 at this time period in London "without incident- escaping the massacre in
 Virginia"- the UK information comes from *my* research not my Aunties) -
 John Basse was married to Elizabeth Keziah- daughter of the Great Petter,
 King of the Nansemond Indians, on 14th of August, 1638. Elizabethdied
4th of Dec, 1676 in Virginia

Richard Basse-7th child of John & Elizabeth born the 2cd of August, 1658and he died the
 26th of December in 1722 in Nansemond Virgina. Hemarried Mary Burwell
on 26 of August,1695 in Namsond, North Carolina (Mary Burwell was his
 2cd wife - Richard Basses' first wife was Jane Bryant - she bore him 6
children and died when 24).

Richard Bass- 3rd child born24th of July 1710 in Virginia and died the 9th of March 1780
 in Sampson, NorthCarolinaand married Elizabeth (?) born ca 1710 Virginia
 They were married about 1738 in Virginia or North Carolina and had 11
 children - the 11th being Andrew.

Andrew Bass- 11th child - born ca. 1768 Duplin County, North Carolina. Died before 1850 in
Barbour County, Alabama. He married Rebecca Pate born abt 1775 in North
Caroline. She died in Clayton, Barbara County, Alabama. They had 7
 children.

Allen Bass - the 3rd child. He was born in 1798 in North Carolina he died in 1854 Barbour
 County, Alabama. He married Molsey Frances Tew who was born ca 1805
 and died in Barbour County Alabama

Hardy Bass-Born 12th of August, 1822 Sampson County , North Carolina. Died 16th of
Sept 1913 buried in Damacus Cemetary, Coffee County Alabama was
 married the 20th of July, 1847 to Clarkey Adaline Long - who was born the
30th of November, 1831 Georgia and died the 23rd of June, 1907 is buried in
same cemetary as Hardy (next to him).

John Hardy Bass- Born 26th of Feb, 1868 in Alabama - he died the 6th of Jan, 1924 in Coffee
 County, Alabama . He was married the 22cd of December, 1887 to
 Christian Ledora Smith was was born in Sept 1862 in Coffee County,
 Alabama and died November of 1905. John Hardy was buried in Beulah
 Baptist Church Cemetary in Opp Alabama & Christian Ledora was buried
 in Bethany Church Cemetary in New Brockton, Alabama (unmarked grave at
 time chart was made but I believe the family changed this & she now lies in
 a marked grave).

Malcolm Rosco Bass - (my grandfather- and one of many children- thats the Bass`s for you -
 they did believe in huge families up to this point) :)
born 24th of Sept, 1898 in Elba, Alabama and died the 9th of July, 1986
Married the 28th of November, 1920 to Sallie Ilene Donaldson - born 20th
 of March, 1904 in DeFuniak Spgs, Florida and died the 2cd of June,
 1967. The are buried side by side in Alaqua Methodist Church
 Cemetary, DeFuniak Spgs Florida - had5 children. Milladeen, Olene,
 John, Milford, Donald.

My Mother is Della Olene - she had myself (eldest) and 2 sons. I have information going back 2 more generations from Humphrey - we originally came from France (the Basse). I started doing research when I was living in Leadhills Scotland (I married a Scot). Writing for records from UK archives.

Also I have information from my aunts chart going back from Clarkeys side of the family (Hardys wife) & of course my maternal grandmothers side (Donaldsons, Trotmans) but I am only sending the organized bits that I have on the Basse family. Does this help or ...?

Hope this post doesn't sound *quite* as disjointed as my first"early morn" post did. This took longer to key in this way than it does to write it on a chart. lol Okies - I am "off to play pogo".
Hope to hear from you soon & if you wish any other info I will certainly hasten to send it to you!

Sincerely~
Tisha Harvey-Davidson
tharveydavidson [tharveydavidson@cableone.net]. 
Last Edited16 Feb 2009

Robert Basse

M, #4499
Father*William Basse b. c 1522
Mother*Mary Carkin b. c 1520, d. 1542
Relationships12th great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
12th great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
 Robert Basse was the son of William Basse and Mary Carkin
Note*1616 He He is mentioned in Humphrey Basses' will as "my bretheren along with a Richard Basse" Will is ambiguous. Possibly Robert was dead. in 1616. 
Last Edited27 Aug 2010

Sally Basse1

F, #2940
Father*John Basse1 d. bt 1820 - 1821
Relationships5th cousin 6 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
5th cousin 6 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
 Sally Basse was the daughter of John Basse.1 
Last Edited1 Dec 1999

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Samuel Basse

M, #2289, b. 15 July 1615, d. 1622
Father*Nathaniel Basse b. 19 Dec 1589, d. 1655
Mother*Mary Jordan b. 1591, d. 1630
Relationships10th great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
10th great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*15 July 1615 Samuel Basse was born on 15 July 1615 at London, England, Stephaun Paul doubts that this person exists.1,2 
 He was the son of Nathaniel Basse and Mary Jordan
Death*1622 He died in 1622 at Jamestown, VA, Apparently his parents were in England at the time of the Massacre. 
EMAIL*February 2001 He wasdiscussed in an e-mail I have since spotted a family tree writeup (can't remember where) indicated that Humphrey and Samuel were, indeed, twins.
The name Algonquins was sometimes used in referring to a variety of tribes living in the area. The term Algonquin referred more to common or similar languages than it did anything else. Most of them were part of the Powhatan Confederation, which attacked the plantations in 1622 and killed 347 people. Algonquins and Powhatans are sometimes used interchangably. The Nansemonds were part of the Powhatan Confederation. Although some romantics want to say that friendly Nansemonds rescued young John Basse from being killed, it is more likely that they were in on the killing. However, just as Pocahantas had helped bring peace by her marriage to the Rolphe guy, I am speculating that Keziah's marriage to John Basse helping bring peace in 1638. The marriage -- coincidentally or not -- came about the same time that a period of peace began -- this following attacks by colonists against the Nansemonds and Warrosquoyackes. I have read of another colonist marrying an Indian -- in addition to the Basse who married Mary Tucker -- so it is possible that these marriages were either arranged or tacitly suggested (if that makes any sense). I am only speculalting. But I don't buy into the idea that John Basse married Keziah because there were no white women available. I think he may have been more interested in maintaining his scalp. However, Keziah may have had his scalp later. in February 2001.3,1 
Last Edited19 Jun 2011

Citations

  1. [S547] Fred Harvey Williiams, "Basse Family," e-mail to Margot Woodrough, Feb 2004.
  2. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.
  3. [S486] Donald Floyd, "Donald Floyd."

Samuel Basse

M, #2296, b. 23 March 1651/52
Father*John Basse Sr. b. 7 Sep 1616, d. 2 Apr 1699
Mother*Elizabeth Keziah Tucker b. c 1624, d. 4 Dec 1676
Relationships9th great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
9th great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*23 March 1651/52 Samuel Basse was born on 23 March 1651/52 at VA
 He was the son of John Basse Sr. and Elizabeth Keziah Tucker
Last Edited30 Nov 1999

Samuel Basse1

M, #2898, b. 20 January 1682/83
Father*Richard Basse1 b. 2 Aug 1658, d. 26 Dec 1722
Mother*Jane Bryant1 b. 17 Dec 1665, d. 14 Feb 1689/90
Relationships1st cousin 10 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
1st cousin 10 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
Birth*20 January 1682/83 Samuel Basse was born on 20 January 1682/83 at VA.1 
 He was the son of Richard Basse and Jane Bryant.1 
Last Edited30 Nov 1999

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Sarah Basse

F, #2273, b. 27 June 1615, d. after 1654
Father*Humphrey Basse b. c 1564, d. 4 Jun 1616
Mother*Mary Buscher b. c 1568, d. 1616
Relationships11th great-grandaunt of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
11th great-grandaunt of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Christening*27 June 1615 Sarah Basse was christened on 27 June 1615 at London, England.1 
 She was the daughter of Humphrey Basse and Mary Buscher
MARRIAGE*circa 1640 She married Thomas Hastler circa 1640 Husband's name from Aug 30 1654 depostion. 
Death*after 1654 She died after 1654 at London, England, She is mentioned in a deposition in 1654. 
Married Name Her married name was Hastler. 
Note*13 May 1616 She is mentioned in her father's will. on 13 May 1616 at London, England
Married Namecirca 1630  As of circa 1630,her married name was Carrellon.2 

Family

Thomas Hastler
MARRIAGE*circa 1640 She married Thomas Hastler circa 1640 Husband's name from Aug 30 1654 depostion. 
Last Edited19 Jul 2009

Citations

  1. [S545] Stephaun Paul, Feb 5 2004.
  2. [S610] Boyd, Boyd's.

Sarah Basse

F, #2924, b. circa 1764
Father*Richard Basse b. c 1730, d. c 1792
Mother*Sarah (?)
Relationships3rd cousin 8 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
3rd cousin 8 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
MARRIAGE* Sarah Basse married Joseph Boon
Birth*circa 1764 She was born circa 1764. 
 She was the daughter of Richard Basse and Sarah (?)
Married Name Her married name was Boon. 

Family

Joseph Boon
Last Edited1 Dec 1999

stillborn Basse

M, #2281, b. 17 January 1629/30
Father*Nathaniel Basse b. 19 Dec 1589, d. 1655
Mother*Mary Jordan b. 1591, d. 1630
Relationships10th great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
10th great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*17 January 1629/30 Stillborn Basse was born on 17 January 1629/30 at London, England.1,2 
 He was the son of Nathaniel Basse and Mary Jordan
Last Edited10 Nov 2007

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.
  2. [S603] Rutherford, online http://www.nelsongenealogy.org/gedcom/sources.html#2

Stillorn Basse

M, #2280, b. after 1613
Birth*after 1613 Stillorn Basse was born after 1613. 
Last Edited4 Jan 1998

Thomas Basse

M, #2302, b. 21 February 1601/2, d. 1603
Father*Humphrey Basse b. c 1564, d. 4 Jun 1616
Mother*Mary Buscher b. c 1568, d. 1616
Relationships11th great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
11th great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Christening*21 February 1601/2 Thomas Basse was christened on 21 February 1601/2 at London, England.1 
 He was the son of Humphrey Basse and Mary Buscher
Death*1603 He died in 1603.1,2 
Burial*11 January 1603 He was buried on 11 January 1603.1,3 
Last Edited15 May 2008

Citations

  1. [S545] Stephaun Paul, Feb 5 2004.
  2. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.
  3. [S610] Boyd, Boyd's.

Thomas Basse1

M, #2909, b. 5 July 1719
Father*Richard Basse1 b. 2 Aug 1658, d. 26 Dec 1722
Mother*Mary Burwell1
Relationships1st cousin 10 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
1st cousin 10 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
Death* Thomas Basse died at Craven, NC.1 
Birth*5 July 1719 He was born on 5 July 1719 at Norfolk, VA.1 
 He was the son of Richard Basse and Mary Burwell.1 
MARRIAGE*circa 1740 He married Sophia Cordwainer circa 1740. 

Family

Sophia Cordwainer
Last Edited27 Apr 2006

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Thomas Basse1

M, #4185, d. before 13 May 1616
Father*William Basse1 b. c 1522
Mother*Mary Carkin1 b. c 1520, d. 1542
Relationships12th great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
12th great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
 Thomas Basse was the son of William Basse and Mary Carkin.1 
Death*before 13 May 1616 He died before 13 May 1616 His brother's will mentions Thomas as deceased and forgives most of his debt.1 
Last Edited20 Jun 2006

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Thomas Basse1

M, #4496
Father*William Basse1 b. 18 Feb 1647/48, d. 1695
Mother*Hester (?)1
Relationships2nd cousin 10 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
2nd cousin 10 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
 Thomas Basse was the son of William Basse and Hester (?).1 
Last Edited19 Jun 2006

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Uriah Basse1

M, #2908, b. 29 October 1716
Father*Richard Basse1 b. 2 Aug 1658, d. 26 Dec 1722
Mother*Mary Burwell1
Relationships1st cousin 10 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
1st cousin 10 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
Birth*29 October 1716 Uriah Basse was born on 29 October 1716 at Norfolk, VA.1 
 He was the son of Richard Basse and Mary Burwell.1 
Last Edited30 Nov 1999

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Uriah Basse

M, #2926, b. 11 June 1766, d. 30 May 1819
Father*Richard Basse b. c 1730, d. c 1792
Mother*Sarah (?)
Relationships3rd cousin 8 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
3rd cousin 8 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
Birth*11 June 1766 Uriah Basse was born on 11 June 1766 at Dobbs, NC
 He was the son of Richard Basse and Sarah (?)
Death*30 May 1819 He died on 30 May 1819 at Madison, AL, at age 52. 
Last Edited1 Dec 1999

Uriah Basse

M, #2930
Father*Edward Basse b. c 1762, d. c 1802
Mother*Sarah Farmer
Relationships4th cousin 7 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
4th cousin 7 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
Birth* Uriah Basse was born Died in infancy. 
 He was the son of Edward Basse and Sarah Farmer
Last Edited1 Dec 1999

Uriah Basse1

M, #2937
Father*John Basse1 d. bt 1820 - 1821
Relationships5th cousin 6 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
5th cousin 6 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
 Uriah Basse was the son of John Basse.1 
Last Edited1 Dec 1999

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.