Edward Basse

M, #2285, b. 8 May 1622, d. September 1696
Father*Nathaniel Basse b. 19 Dec 1589, d. 1655
Mother*Mary Jordan b. 1591, d. 1630
Relationships10th great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
10th great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*8 May 1622 Edward Basse was born on 8 May 1622 at London, England.1,2 
 He was the son of Nathaniel Basse and Mary Jordan
MARRIAGE*1644 He married Mary Tucker in 1644...Edward Basse took in marriage one virtuous Indian Maydn by the Christian name of Mary Tucker and went to live amongst the Showanoes in Carolina in 1644 AD. He went to Carolinas in latter years in pursute of trade and not in 1644. Dyed in 1696 (last two sentences added at a later date, but in same handwriting).1 
Death*September 1696 He died in September 1696 at Chowan, NC, at age 74 His death record states: "a devout and Godly man."1 
Name Variation The letter "A" is for identification purposes and is not part of his name.3 
Biography*1644  "Edward Basse, sonne of Nathll and Mary Basse yt unregenerated by ye Spirit of God, took in marriage one virtuos Indian maydn by the Christian name of Mary Tucker and went to live amongst the Showanocs in Carolina in 1644 AD. He went to Carolina in later years in persute of trade and not in 1644. Dyed in 1696 Ad."1 

Family

Mary Tucker d. before 21 April 1713
Children
Last Edited26 Sep 2009

Citations

  1. [S460] Basse Sermon Book.
  2. [S547] Fred Harvey Williiams, "Basse Family," e-mail to Margot Woodrough, Feb 2004.
  3. [S487] John Bass, Documents MVW file.

Edward Basse1

M, #2923, b. circa 1762, d. circa 1802
Father*Richard Basse1 b. c 1730, d. c 1792
Mother*Sarah (?)1
Relationships3rd cousin 8 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
3rd cousin 8 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
MARRIAGE* Edward Basse married Sarah Farmer
Birth*circa 1762 He was born circa 1762.1 
 He was the son of Richard Basse and Sarah (?).1 
Death*circa 1802 He died circa 1802 at Wayne, NC.1 

Family

Sarah Farmer
Children
Last Edited1 Dec 1999

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Elizabeth Basse

F, #2299, b. 12 July 1645
Father*John Basse Sr. b. 7 Sep 1616, d. 2 Apr 1699
Mother*Elizabeth Keziah Tucker b. c 1624, d. 4 Dec 1676
Relationships9th great-grandaunt of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
9th great-grandaunt of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Death* Elizabeth Basse died at VA.1 
Birth*12 July 1645 She was born on 12 July 1645 at VA.1 
 She was the daughter of John Basse Sr. and Elizabeth Keziah Tucker
Last Edited30 Nov 1999

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Elizabeth Basse

F, #2921, b. circa 1759
Father*Richard Basse b. c 1730, d. c 1792
Mother*Sarah (?)
Relationships3rd cousin 8 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
3rd cousin 8 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
MARRIAGE* Elizabeth Basse married James Stevens.1 
Birth*circa 1759 She was born circa 1759. 
 She was the daughter of Richard Basse and Sarah (?)
Married Name Her married name was Stevens. 

Family

James Stevens
Last Edited1 Dec 1999

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Elizabeth Basse1

F, #3118
Father*Edward Basse1 b. 8 May 1622, d. Sep 1696
Mother*Mary Tucker1 d. b 21 Apr 1713
Relationships1st cousin 11 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
1st cousin 11 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
 Elizabeth Basse was the daughter of Edward Basse and Mary Tucker.1 
Last Edited26 Nov 2000

Citations

  1. [S487] John Bass, Documents MVW file.

Elizabeth Basse1

F, #4497
Father*William Basse1 b. 18 Feb 1647/48, d. 1695
Mother*Hester (?)1
Relationships2nd cousin 10 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
2nd cousin 10 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
 Elizabeth Basse was the daughter of William Basse and Hester (?).1 
Last Edited19 Jun 2006

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Genevieve Basse

F, #2292, b. 9 October 1624
Father*Nathaniel Basse b. 19 Dec 1589, d. 1655
Mother*Mary Jordan b. 1591, d. 1630
Relationships10th great-grandaunt of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
10th great-grandaunt of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
MARRIAGE* Genevieve Basse married Peter Knight Taken from p. 10 of Historical Isle of Wight County that cites research by Oliver L. Perry, Sr. 
Birth*9 October 1624 She was born on 9 October 1624 She was a twin.1 
 She was the daughter of Nathaniel Basse and Mary Jordan
Married Name Her married name was Knight. 

Family

Peter Knight b. circa 1600
Last Edited27 Apr 2006

Citations

  1. [S460] Basse Sermon Book.

George Basse1

M, #2282, b. 11 December 1628, d. 1681
Father*Nathaniel Basse b. 19 Dec 1589, d. 1655
Mother*Mary Jordan b. 1591, d. 1630
Relationships10th great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
10th great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*11 December 1628 George Basse was born on 11 December 1628.2 
 He was the son of Nathaniel Basse and Mary Jordan
Death*1681 He died in 1681.2 
Last Edited10 Nov 2007

Citations

  1. Birth and death dates from Historical Notes on Isle of Wight County p 10.
  2. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Gregory Basse

M, #2283, b. 10 December 1628
Father*Nathaniel Basse b. 19 Dec 1589, d. 1655
Mother*Mary Jordan b. 1591, d. 1630
Relationships10th great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
10th great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*10 December 1628 Gregory Basse was born on 10 December 1628 Gregory and George were twins.1 
 He was the son of Nathaniel Basse and Mary Jordan
Last Edited19 Jun 2006

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Hester Basse

F, #2275, b. 3 July 1597
Father*Humphrey Basse b. c 1564, d. 4 Jun 1616
Mother*Mary Buscher b. c 1568, d. 1616
Relationships11th great-grandaunt of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
11th great-grandaunt of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Christening*3 July 1597 Hester Basse was christened on 3 July 1597 at London, England; Baptisim recorded at St. Gabriel Fenchurch St.1,2 
 She was the daughter of Humphrey Basse and Mary Buscher
MARRIAGE*5 September 1616 She married Thomas Hobson on 5 September 1616 at England Husband's name from Aug 30 1654 deposition. Location of marriage given as Stepney (I take this to be a church name).1,3 
Note*13 May 1616 She She was mentioned in her father's will. on 13 May 1616. 
Married Name1654  As of 1654,her married name was Hobson Called Hester Hobson of Bromley (widow) in 1654 deposition. 

Family

Thomas Hobson d. before 1654
Last Edited15 May 2008

Citations

  1. [S545] Stephaun Paul, Feb 5 2004.
  2. [S610] Boyd, Boyd's.
  3. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Humphery Basse

M, #2290, b. 15 July 1615, d. 22 March 1623/24
Father*Nathaniel Basse b. 19 Dec 1589, d. 1655
Mother*Mary Jordan b. 1591, d. 1630
Relationships10th great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
10th great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*15 July 1615 Humphery Basse was born on 15 July 1615 at London, England.1 
 He was the son of Nathaniel Basse and Mary Jordan
Death*22 March 1623/24 He died on 22 March 1623/24 at Jamestown, VA, at age 8 Note from Stephaun Paul whom I respect tremenduosly. - I cannot emphasize this more strongly; the legend of Humphrey dying in the massacre is based on a misunderstanding of double dates. IT IS ABSOLUTELY FALSE! As I prove in the Polemic, it was impossible for Humphrey to have died in the massacre. He died the following year. There can be no doubt that Humphrey died a year-to-date from the massacre, probably in the Plague of the Abigail. I really don’t want to see this error further perpetuated. Following is the proof as I’ve stated it in the Polemic:
http://web.me.com/depaul7/Polemic/Welcome.html.1,2,3 
EMAIL*February 2001 

The name Algonquins was sometimes used in referring to a variety of tribes living in the area. The term Algonquin referred more to common or similar languages than it did anything else. Most of them were part of the Powhatan Confederation, which attacked the plantations in 1622 and killed 347 people. Algonquins and Powhatans are sometimes used interchangably. The Nansemonds were part of the Powhatan Confederation. Although some romantics want to say that friendly Nansemonds rescued young John Basse from being killed, it is more likely that they were in on the killing. However, just as Pocahantas had helped bring peace by her marriage to the Rolphe guy, I am speculating that Keziah's marriage to John Basse helping bring peace in 1638. The marriage -- coincidentally or not -- came about the same time that a period of peace began -- this following attacks by colonists against the Nansemonds and Warrosquoyackes. I have read of another colonist marrying an Indian -- in addition to the Basse who married Mary Tucker -- so it is possible that these marriages were either arranged or tacitly suggested (if that makes any sense). I am only speculalting. But I don't buy into the idea that John Basse married Keziah because there were no white women available. in February 2001.4 
Last Edited19 Jun 2011

Citations

  1. [S460] Basse Sermon Book.
  2. [S547] Fred Harvey Williiams, "Basse Family," e-mail to Margot Woodrough, Feb 2004.
  3. [S626] Stephaun Paul, "Polemic," e-mail to MVW, august 2010.
  4. [S486] Donald Floyd, "Donald Floyd."

Humphrey Basse

M, #2264, b. circa 1564, d. 4 June 1616
Father*William Basse b. c 1522
Mother*Mary Carkin b. c 1520, d. 1542
Relationships12th great-grandfather of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
12th great-grandfather of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
ReferenceB-12,544
Birth*circa 1564 Humphrey Basse was born circa 1564 at France. 
 He was the son of William Basse and Mary Carkin
MARRIAGE*1588 He married Mary Buscher, daughter of Dominick Buscher and Genevieve Clerke ?, in 1588. 
Death*4 June 1616 He died on 4 June 1616 at London, England, Here is a note from Don Floyd in 2005: I think I know what Humphrey Basse and Mary Bushier Basse died of: typhus. also called "The New Fever." According to an Internet source, there was an outbreak of typhus in London in 1616, and William Shakespeare died that year, also apparently of typhus. Mary died a little more than a month after Humphrey. Sometimes this happens because of unconsolable grief, but in this case, I think it was infectious disease. She may have caught it from him, or they both may have caught it because they lived in probably the unhealthiest place on earth.

They also could have died of smallpox, the disease that killed Pocahontas in 1617, but to me typhus is a more likely suspect.
I also think that Nathaniel Basse possibly or probably died of Bubonic Plague, also called "Black Death." There was an epidemic of this dreaded disease in the United Kingdom in 1654, the year that Nathaniel died in London. Guess who else died in London that year. William Basse the poet. I believe there is a connection between this poet and Nathaniel, possibly cousins, but I have nothing solid on that. William Basse was a devotee of Shakespeare and wrote an opus extolling his merits. If Nathaniel and William Basse did die of Bubonic Plague they both suffered agonizing deaths.
I notice that a serious economic decline began in England in 1620. Do you think Nathaniel Basse and the other early Virginia leaders could read the economic tea leaves in London and that's the reason (or a reason) they headed for the New World? 
Probate*1619 His estate was probated in 1619 Jan. 19.      552. Court Minutes of the East India Company. Letter read from the Lords of the Council, renewing a business which was in question two years since about the suppression of pirates, for which the city proffered 20,000l. a year for two years conditionally, desiring to know what the Company will undertake, as the King intends to have it put in execution this summer. Acquittance read from Sir Jas. Cunningham for losses sustained by himself and company in their Greenland voyage, but no mention made of any release, according to the Lords' promise; to be shown to Mr. Solicitor to get an effectual assignment and release for Sir James to seal. Three ships to be employed for Bantam and two ships and a pinnace for Surat, "being uncertain of the Portugals' attempts, and therefore to go with a reasonable strength to Surat and so to Jasques." Petition of Richard Giles and John Wilson for some consideration for burning of logwood. Small pearls to be sent back from Surat, as they will not yield the profit expected. Letter read from George Ball from Bantam, 15 June last ; also a letter from the Low Countries, both stating that the Hollanders had taken and sunk some ships of the English, near Pooloroon and Bantam, "showing the continuance of their pride and hatred against the English." Petition of Nathaniel Basse concerning his security for bills to the Company for his father. [One page and three quarters. Court Bk. IV., 284-286.] 
Occupation*1589 A number of his children were baptized at St. Gabriel, Fenchurch St. London between the years 1571 and 1620. The church was destroyed during the great fire and was not rebuilt. A plaque was placed on Fenchurch Street to mark it's previous location. At the time their christenings were recorded Humphrey was called: haberdasher, French merchant (against Mynsyng Layne), marchart, girdler, marchant in the High Street. in 1589 at London, England
Occupation1589 He was Ottywell Smyth to Walsingham.
John Welles still a prisoner at Roanne. A gentleman brings news from the court that the French King is still at Angeres with a very strong camp. Thinks that the King of Navarre has passed the river, that Memoransee's forces are with him, and that Espernon waits until de Maine advances. Paris news that de Maine is at Etampes with great forces. On Thursday at Paris he summoned all soldiers to join him in twenty-four hours on pain of death, as Navarre's forces were said to be advancing on him. Secret report that some of de Maine's forces are beaten. Caenne news that Monpansiere besieges Fallysse and has ambushed and routed 3,000 men under the Count de Bryssake, killing 1,200. A Roanne report that he has taken Fallysse: if so, only Lysyouexe, a weak place, is between him and Roanne.
Those of Roanne do more hurt than all the rest. Besides several other castles, they took within the last two days Chateau Galyarde, which closed the river between Paris and Roanne. This governor recently sent powder, etc., thither. The governor of Chateau Galyarde surrendered for two thousand crowns after three days' siege: he could have held out for a year. They have but 4 castles more to take and then will probably besiege this town. This governor wants powder, etc. [as in Smyth's letter of the 7th, above, p. 203]: he has supplied much to various gentlemen and has no money. He wants Smyth to supply the gentlemen, who will pay him though they will not pay the governor. The governor of Caenne wrote to this governor for powder. If Humphrey Basse, merchant, may send over by Rye four or five thousand pounds, Smyth could supply everybody. Desires licence for this. Those of Rye allow strangers, but not Englishmen, to bring over powder. A small barque set forth by this governor, who prepares one or two more, took boats going from Roanne to Picardy. The governor of New-haven wants a truce: it is unlikely.
News came this week by three ships from Cyvylle in Spain that sixty very rich great ships went for the Indies not six weeks ago: thirty good ships could have taken them. No other army preparing. A Fleming, five years resident at Cyvell, says that not above forty sail of the army for England came back, and that the whole country is in poor estate for lack of traffic, corn being exceptionally dear and their crops burnt up by the great heat. Less than three weeks ago three small barques came from Spain with wool sacks, but in them were, it is said, over 200,000 crowns for Flanders and the League. The Indies fleet is expected within two months, with over 12 millions for the King, who would be undone for ever were it taken. Small barques will come with treasure to Newhaven this summertime: some small pinnaces lying off this coast might easily take them. Requests powder again.
Has sent four dozen quail, the first he has seen this year, to Mr. Dydsberye for Walsingham.—Dyepe, 26 April, 1589.
Postscript. Encloses a letter for Mr. Graye, brought by a Scot. This governor wants a good gunner: he expects a siege. Holograph. Add. Endd. Seal. 2 pp. [France XIX. f. 107.] in 1589.1 
CHARTER1600 He was in 1600; The Dutch were attempting to get a monopoly on the importation of pepper from the east. Londen merchants sought and were granted a charter to compete under the name of the name of English East India Company.
Dec 31. Westminster.     281. Charter of incorporation of the East India Company by the name of the Governor and Company of Merchants of London trading into the East Indies. "A privilege for fifteen years granted by Her Majesty to certain adventurers for the discovery of the trade for the East Indies;" that is to say, to Geo. Earl of Cumberland, and two hundred and fifteen knights, aldermen, and merchants, as follows [where Purchas has printed the names differently his spelling is inserted in brackets]:_
     Sir John Hart.     Robt. Lee.     Thos. Smythe and Thos. Cambell, citizens and aldermen of London.
Sir John Spencer.     Leonard Holliday.
Sir Edward Michelborne.     John Watts.
John Moore.
Wm. Cavendishe.     Edward Holmeden.     Edward Barker.
Paul Bannynge.     Robt. Hampson.     Thos. Marsh.
Sam. Backhowse.     Wm. Jennynges.     John Wragge.
Jas. Lancaster.     Gyles Paslowe.     Wm. Dale.
Rich. Staper.     Robt. Bell.     Lawrence Waldoe.
Thos. Cordell.     Thos. White.     Hen. Bridgman.
Wm. Garwey.     Nicholas Lynge.     Sam. Armitage.
Oliver Style.     Wm. Palmer.     Edward Harrison.
Wm. Quarles.     Ellis Crippes.     Edmond Nicholson
Bartholomew Barnes.     Geo. Bolles.     [Edward].
Wm. Offley.     Nic. Crispe. [These two last names omitted by Purchas.]     Clement Mosley.
Robt. Chamberlain.          John Newman.
John Harby [Harvy].          Hump. Wallcott [Wallot].
Rich. Wiseman.     John Merricke.     Thos. Richardson.
Wm. Stone.     Hump. Handforde.     Thos. Boothby.
Fras. Cherie.     Thos. Simondes.     John Couchman
Thos. Allabaster.     Robt. Cockes.     [Coachman].
Rich. Barret.     Wm. Wastall [Wustall].     Reynold Greene.
John Swinarton the younger.          Ric. Barret [Burret].
John Humphrey.     Robt. Mildmay.     
Thos. Garwey [Garaway].     Thos. Bostocke.     Wm. Hynde.
Bart. Hollande.     Geo. Chandlor.     
Wm. Romeny.     Ric. Cockes.     Edward Lutterforde.
Jas. Deane.     Wm. Walton.     Wm. Barret [Burrell].
John Eldred.     Wm. Freeman.     Step. Harvy.
And. Banninge.     Thos. Southacke.     Thos. Henshawe.
Edward Leanynge [Loaning].     John Frier.     Wm. Ferris.
Fras. Dent.     Wm. Aldersey.
Thos. Juxon [Jackson].     Ric. Balle [Bull].     Wm. Hewitt.
Ric. Pierce.     Wm. Fisher.
Nich. Leate.     Roger Heaminge [Henyng].     Jos. Salbucke [Salbanke].
John Wolstenholme.
Nic. Pearde.     Robt. Cobbe.
Wm. Chamber.     Robt. Robinson.     Nic. Manley.
Rowland Backhowse.     Fras. Evington.     Nic. Salter.
Hump. Smith.     Fras. Taylor.     Wm. Willaston.
Robt. Sandy.     Thos. Westwray [Westwrow].     Wm. Angel.
Hen. Robinson.     Nic. Barnealy.
Rich. Pointell.     John Midleton.     John Hawkins.
John Highlorde.     Robt. Gore.     Roger Dye.
Wm. Harrison.     Raphe Gore.     Ric. Clarke.
Hum. Style.     Wm. Cater.     Thos. Hewitt.
Hump. Robinson.     Geo. Cater.     George Whitmore.
Nic. Ferror.     John Busbridge.     Hen. Polsteade [Polstee].
Thos. Farrington.     Thos. Horton.
John Combe.     Wm. Bond.     Wm. Greenwell.
Robt. Offley.     Wm. Cotton.     Robt. Johnson.
Roger Howe.     John Stockley.     Bart. Hagget [Huggott].
John Hewitt.     Roger Ofield.
Jas. Turner.     Augustine Skinner.     Hump. Basse.
Morris Abbot.     Ric. Wiche [Wise].     Robt. Bucke.
Robt. Careill [Jas. Carrell].     Robt. Towerson.     Ambrose. Wheeler.
Ric. Talby.     Wm. Hale.
Robt. Brooke.     Robt. Midleton.     Rich. Hale [Hull], junior.
Ric. Chamberlain.     Robt. Bateman.
Geo. Chamberlain.     Ric. Gosson.     John Hodgson.
Leonard White.     Robt. Waldoe [Waldore].     Alfonsus Fowle [Foote].
John Cornelius.
Raphe Busby [Basby].     Ric. Wragge.     Edmund Spencer.
Ric. Piott.     Thos. Talbott.     Ric. Deane [Denne].
Wm. Bonham.     Robt. Pennington.     Ric. Ironsyde.
Edward Barkham.     Hump. Milwarde.     Geo. Smythes.
Geo. Colles.     Ric. Hearne.     Jas. Dunkin.
Raphe Hamor.     Raphe Allen.     Edw. Walter.
Jas. Cullimore [Colymer].     John Brooke.     And. Chamberlain.
Ant. Gibson.     Robt. Stratford.
Samuel Hare.     Robt. Kayes.     Ant. Stratford.
Geo. Utley ["disfranched" 6th July, 1601].     Hugh Crumpton [Crompton]     Wm. Millett.
Simon Lawrence.
Ric. Washer.     Thos. Lydall.
Gregory Allen.     Geo. Holman.     Step. Hodgson.
Hen. Archer.     Morrice Llewellin.     Ric. Wrighte.
Jeffrey Kyrby.     Ric. Persons [Parsons].     Wm.Starky [Starker].
John Cason.          Wm. Smyth.
Ric. Beale.     Fras. Barker.     John Ellacot.
Thos. Shipton.     Wm. Turnor.     Robt. Bayly, and
John Fletcher.     John Greenwoode.     Roger Cotton
     Licence at their own costs and charges to set forth one or more voyages to the East Indies, in the countries and parts of Asia and Africa, and to the islands thereabouts, divers of which countries and islands have long since been discovered by others of the Queen's subjects; to have succession and purchase lands without limitation; to have a common seal.
     Sir Thos. Smythe, alderman, to be the first governor, and     Wm. Garway.     Robt. Sandy.
Oliver Style.     John Eldred.
Jas. Lancaster.     Ric. Wyche.
Paul Bannynge.     Ric. Wiseman.     John Highlorde.
Leonard Hallyday.     Fras. Chery.     John Middleton.
John Moore.     Thos. Allabaster.     John Coombe.
Edward Holmden.     Wm. Romney.     Wm. Harrison.
Rich. Staper.     Roger Howe.     Nic. Lynge, and
Thos. Cordell.     Wm. Chambers.     Robt. Bell
     the twenty–four committees, to be elected annually, and jointly to have the direction of the voyages, the provision of shipping, and merchandise; and a deputy governor to be chosen in a general court, each to take the oath of fidelity, and to be elected within the first six days in July in each year, and every member of the Company to take an oath before being admitted to traffic as a freeman of the Company. Privileges to the sons, apprentices, servants, and factors in India of the adventurers. The governor or deputy governor always to be present at general assemblies when reasonable laws, constitutions, &c., agreeably to the laws of England, may be made, and offenders against them punished by fine or imprisonment. Exemption from paying customs for, the first four voyages; to be allowed to give their bonds payable at six and twelve months for customs afterwards payable for merchandise from India; further privileges of customs. Liberty to export in each voyage thirty thousand pounds in foreign coin or bullion; so as at least 6,000l. be first coined at the Mint; to send yearly to the East Indies six good ships and six pinnaces with 500 mariners, unless the royal navy go forth. None of the Queen's subjects, but the Company, their servants, and assigns, to resort to India without the Company's licence upon pain of forfeiting ships and cargoes, half to the Queen and half to the Company, with imprisonment till the offenders give 1,000l. bond not to trade thither again. Power to grant licences to trade to the East Indies. Apprentices, servants, factors, &c., may be admitted to the freedom of the Company by the majority. Silver exported to be shipped only at the ports of London, Dartmouth, and Plymouth, and duly entered by the Custom House officers without paying customs. ["We have not any liberty granted to carry out any gold by name, but only silver."_Marginal note.] If this charter shall not appear profitable to the crown and realm it may cease after two years' notice; if otherwise, the Queen promises at the end of this term to grant the Company a new charter for another fifteen years. Sixteen pages, with marginal notes. Brit Mus., Harleian, 306, fol. 17–25. Printed in Purchas, I., 139–47. See also Bruce's Annals of the E. I. Comp., I, 136–139, who quotes this charter from the "Printed Collection of East India Charters, p. 3," and Anderso[n's Hist, of Commerce, II., 196–197, who adds "This is the very same East Ind. Comp. which through many various vicissitudes existed under the same denomination until the year 1708, when it was absorbed by the present [1787] United Company of Merchants of England trading to the East." 
CHARTER1 July 1608 He was on 1 July 1608; 1608.
July 1.     417. Court Minutes of the East India Company. Sir Thos. Smythe elected governor, Wm. Greenwell deputy governor, and the following committees:—
     John Eldred.     Wm. Harrison.     Wm. Bonham.
Wm. Cockayne.     Robt. Middleton.     Wm. Millett.
Nich. Crispe.     Hugh Hamersley.     Thos. Styles.
Robt. Johnson.     Reynold Greene.     Wm. Jennyngs.
Henry Robinson.     Humphrey Basse.     Morris Abbott.
Humphrey Smyth.     Robt. Bell.     Jeoffrey Kirby.
Wm. Cater.     Ralph Freeman.     John Busbridge.
Thos. Westwray.     Geo. Bennett.     Edmond Scott.
     Thos. Farrington, treasurer; Wm. Leighton, secretary; Thos. Stephens, account keeper to Michaelmas; and in the meantime to finish the accounts of the first three voyages; and Thos. Evesett, beadle or officer of the Company. Order for buying timber, with the overplus of money belonging to the third voyage, confirmed. Power to the governor, deputy, and committees to promise gratifications in their discretion. The Act of 11 January 1601–2, for absence and late coming to courts, to be duly executed from henceforth, and a register kept of the names of those absent; all fines on that account to be set against each man's account, unless he gives just reason for his absence. Ten pounds to be given in charity to Sarah, widow of Wm. Brum, captain of the Ascension in the first voyage, who was killed by a shot from a great piece of ordnance, unadvisedly discharged out of the Dragon at the burial of one Mr. Winter, near the coast of the East Indies. Loan to Nich. Crispe and Sam. Garrett. [Two pages and a half. Court Bk., II, 98–99.]2 
Note*1610 He 5. [f.3] 25 Aug. 1610. Award by Trinity House

Humphrey Basse, girdler of London, Luke Barefoote and Tobias Johnson, mariners of London, on the one hand, and Thomas Silvester, Thomas Wilkenson, mariners of Ipswich, Samuel Cutler, merchant, Edward Man, vintner, Elizabeth Man, spinster, and John Sturgen, brewer of Ipswich, on the other, entered bonds [4] of £200 on 4 Aug. 1610 to accept the award of at least 6 members of Trinity House in respect of their dispute, provided that the award be made before 4 Sept. 1610. The award is as follows: (a) Silvester and his associates are to pay £47 to Basse and his associates. £21 is to be deposited at the house of Richard Nottingham in Ratcliff on 29 Sept., and the balance on 2 Nov. 1610. (b) Wilkenson is to pay £30 towards the cost of weighing the Providence of London in the Thames, of which Johnson was master. (c) The liability to pay the £47 [f.3v] and the cost of weighing the Providence over and above the £30 which Wilkenson himself has to pay is to be shared between Silvester and his associates in proportion to their shares in the ownership of the Sea Adventure of Ipswich at the time of the weighing of the Providence. (d) On or before 10 Sept., both parties are to relinquish all claims on each other in respect of all disputes up to 4 Aug. 1610. Documents to this effect are to be deposited at the house of Nottingham by 12 Sept. 1610. (e) Both parties are to pay a fee of [blank] to Nottingham, clerk of Trinity House, for drawing up this award.

Hugh Merret, Robert Salmon, William Jurden, William Jones, Robert Kytchen, Robert Ryckman, Thomas Milton, Nicholas Dygens, Matthew Woodcot, William Byam, John Osborne, John Skinner. in 1610.3 
CHARTER*12 March 1612  On 12 March 1612 at London, England, He was listed with a long list of others on the Third Virginia Charter indicating that he subscribed money to the project. I suspect this was how his sons including Nathaniel became involved with the colony at such an early time.The new Charter of March 25, 1612 extended the territorial boundaries of Virginia to include the Bermuda Islands, often written in the documents of the time as, "the bermoodies". This Charter reduced the control of the London Company Treasurer and his council and gave much more power to the ordinary stockholder with regard to the affairs of both the London Company itself and to the government in the Colony. The Charter provided for the establishment of a lottery to create a permanent fund to support the future needs of Virginia. And, most importantly, the 1612 Charter introduced a democratic element that allowed the reorganization of the Virginia Colony Government in 1618. Under this reorganization, the first representative assembly outside England's Parliament, came into being when the Burgesses gathered at Jamestowne July 30, 1619. This new system of colonial representation became the model of all future English colonies in the New World and the very basis of the democratic institutions in the future United States of America. The London Company continued to operate under the modified Charter of 1612 until Virginia became the King's Royal Colony, 1624.
Society Historian
This was just about the time that West Indian tobacco was being introduced and only two years before the marriage of Pocohantas that occurred on April 5, 1614.

Upon further research I've discovered that he was also part of the East India Company. Here is a brief description:
Having secured his monopoly grant of colonization, Sir Walter Raleigh "planted" in 1585 the first English colony in what would later be the United States, on Roanoke Island off the coast of present-day North Carolina. The area had been first explored by Ralph Lane and Richard Grenville under Raleigh's direction the previous year, and was named Virginia in honor of England's virgin queen. The new colony had few dedicated settlers, however, and the people returned to England two years later. In 1587 still another Raleigh expedition, headed by the painter John White, tried to effect a permanent settlement of Roanoke Island. Indeed, the first English child born in America, Virginia Dare, granddaughter of John White, was born that summer at Roanoke Colony. But English interest in and communication with the tiny colony was cut off during the battle with the Spanish Armada, and White, stranded in England, could not return to Roanoke until 1591. He could then find no trace of any of the colonists. The first attempt at English colonization of America had totally failed.
If Raleigh and Gilbert had received their inspiration for colonizing from such men as Hakluyt, their practical experience had been picked up in the course of subduing and enslaving Ireland. After serving in the army attempting to impose English rule on Ireland, Gilbert had proposed, in the late 1560s, to plant Englishmen in Ulster, as the Irish were forcibly driven out. A few years later, Gilbert became governor of Munster in Southern Ireland; in the course of "pacifying" the Irish, he drove out Irish peasants and replaced them with West Country English. Even as late as 1580, Gilbert and Raleigh fought together to suppress the Irish in Munster, and were rewarded with sizable grants of land. After the American colonizing failures, Raleigh turned his attention back to Ireland. There he planted English colonists to grow tobacco on the forty thousand acres of land he had been granted in Munster. In 1589 Raleigh, having expended forty thousand pounds on the American failure and not succeeding in persuading the queen to supply more, was happy to sell his patent for North American colonization to a group of associates and London merchants, largely connected with the Muscovy Company and including John White, the Reverend Richard Hakluyt, and Sir Thomas Smith. Raleigh, however, reserved to himself the right of dominion over the prospective colony.
Leading circles in and around the Muscovy Company had thus resumed the monopoly of rights to exploration and colonization of North America, which monopoly they had briefly held a decade earlier. But now they had a far greater incentive to pursue their grant to try to find compensation for the upheavals of the spice and Baltic trade, and of Antwerp, during the 1580s. Consideration was therefore given to establishing a sea trade direct to the East Indies by English and Dutch merchants. Thomas Cavendish, who had served on the Raleigh voyage to America in 1585, had sailed around the world during 1585-88 and had returned with a cargo of spices. The war with Spain now completely cut England off from the Levant spice trade, and in 1589 the London merchants received permission from the Privy Council to send three ships to the East Indies, carrying silver out of the country to pay for spices. Cavendish and John Davis, another old associate of Raleigh, made an unsuccessful attempt to circumnavigate the world. James Lancaster, who had been a merchant in Lisbon, was in 1591 dispatched with three ships to India; he returned in 1594 with one ship and a cargo of spices. In 1593 the Muscovy and Levant companies moved to the fore, sending George Weymouth to search for a northwest passage to India along the coast of North America.
The Dutch began in 1594 to form companies for distant voyages around Africa to India. Their first fleet returned in 1597, thereby giving a new impetus to the activity of English merchants. In 1598 alone, Dutch companies sent five fleets, totaling twenty-two ships, to the Indies; John Davis was the chief pilot of the Zeeland fleet. By 1601, over a dozen Dutch fleets of almost seventy ships had sailed for the East Indies. Because of renewed English voyages and conflicts with the Portuguese, the Dutch merchants forming the companies that had sent the ships to the East Indies began to amalgamate them, and in March 1602 all the Dutch companies merged into the United East India Company.
In September 1599, London merchants belonging to various trading companies, especially the Levant Company, formed an association on the model of the successful Dutch companies and petitioned the government to charter a company of London merchants having a monopoly of trade by sea to the East Indies. The charter to the East India Company was granted on December 31, 1600, under the title of the "The Governor, and Company of Merchants of London Trading into the East Indies"; the Levant Company was granted a new charter to distinguish the monopoly areas of the two companies. The governor named in the charter of the East India Company was Sir Thomas Smith (or Smythe). Smith's grandfather, Andrew Judd, had been a principal founder of the Muscovy Company. His father had preceded him as a leading tax collector, and had been a key royal official in erecting the edifice of royal absolutism, high taxation, and economic restrictionism during the Elizabethan era. Smith was governor also of the Muscovy Company and the Levant Company, of which he was a founder, and was also the principal member of the group of London merchants to whom Raleigh had in 1589 assigned his patent for American colonization. Indeed, Smith was the governor of every one of England's privileged companies then interested in foreign commerce and colonization. Smith has been referred to as the greatest "merchant-prince" of his era, but it is clear that his status and wealth arose not from private trade, but from the governmental privileges of tax farming and grants of monopoly.
The first voyage of the East India Company went out under the direction of James Lancaster and John Davis in 1601, and was followed the next year by George Weymouth's second voyage along the coast of North America, sponsored by the East India and Muscovy companies. Meanwhile, Sir Walter Raleigh resumed his interest in the New World in 1602, sending out another futile expedition to search for survivors of the Roanoke Colony. But in the following year, Raleigh's colonizing activities were unceremoniously cut short by the accession of King James I to the throne of England. One of James's first acts was to consign Raleigh to an indefinite imprisonment in the Tower and abruptly to vacate his dominion over Virginia. Among the king's motives was the desire to give Spain a tangible token of the new king's wish to conclude peace between the two warring countries. For Raleigh was now perhaps the most ardent warmonger and plunderer against Spanish shipping and whose colonizing activities sought bases for aggression against Spain; his incarceration was therefore a particularly apt token of peace between the two nations. Indeed, peace was concluded the next year, in August 1604, after which King James cracked down on the formerly lionized captains of piracy and freebooting.
American Neofeudalism
The Treaty of London of 1604 provided for freedom of commerce between England and Spain, as it had existed prior to the war. Since England had had the right to sail to Spain and Portugal, England now claimed that its ships could sail to the East and West Indies as well. Spanish America was the source of tobacco, and its use in England increased greatly once trade was reestablished on a regular basis, even though James disapproved of its use as a poisonous weed. Although the London merchants hoped to monopolize the renewed trade with Spain, the protests of the merchants of the West Country ports, especially Bristol and Plymouth, forced the government to backtrack. First it tried to include the West Country merchants in the monopoly, and then it decreed for all English merchants freedom of trade to Portugal, Spain, and the western Mediterranean, a policy that was later to apply to American merchants. At the same time, the privileged merchants of the Levant and Muscovy companies were suffering further losses because of local difficulties, especially foreign invasions of Russia.
While economic pressure was turning the attention of English merchants once again to possible markets and supplies of raw materials in North America, and peace renewed attention to the New World that had been diverted by the war against Spain, the peace treaty also terminated the previously permanent employment of many military and naval officers engaged in the war. In 1605 Weymouth again explored the coast of New England, this time in behalf of a group of soldier-courtiers, including Sir Ferdinando Gorges, the Earl of Southampton, and the latter's brother-in-law, Sir Thomas Arundel. Weymouth's return in July 1605 led to several projects for trade and colonization in America, and in September of that year, petitions were presented to the Privy Council for the formation of companies to engage in these activities. Although the Privy Council was then considering a project to plant English colonists in the lands taken from the Irish in Ulster, the value of North American colonies to English shipowners and to the English navy led the Trinity House Corporation and the Privy Council to approve the petitions. Finally, in April 1606 Raleigh's old dominion over Virginia was granted to two sets of powerful merchants, which included the merchants to whom Raleigh had sold his rights of trade.
The new patent divided the monopoly powers of government over Virginia between two joint stock companies of merchants. The South Virginia Company was to have claim over the land between the thirty-fourth and thirty-eighth parallels, roughly from Cape Fear north to the Potomac River; the North Virginia Company was to rule between the forty-first and forty-fifth parallels, roughly from Long Island to Maine. To stimulate competition and to provide incentive for colonizing, the zone in between was thrown open to settlement by either company, with the stipulation that one could not settle within one hundred miles of the other. Since the South Virginia Company was headed by leading merchants of London, it soon became known as the London Company; while the North Virginia Company, centered around merchants of Plymouth, came to be called the Plymouth Company. Each company was granted powers to allocate its land in any way it wished; the king reserved the then customary royalty of five percent of whatever gold or silver might be mined from the new land. Insisting upon overall royal control and dominion unique to monopoly charters of that era, the king vested supervisory control of the two companies in a Royal Council of Virginia, which was appointed by the king and which in turn was to appoint resident local councils to govern each of the two colonies. The settlers and their descendants were supposed to enjoy all the "liberties, franchises, and immunities" of Englishmen at home - a clause immediately contradicted by the absence of any provision for elections or home rule.
The Plymouth Company for North Virginia was composed of west country merchants, gentry, and soldiers, and was headed by the governor of Plymouth, Sir Ferdinando Gorges, who desired to establish a fishing and fur-trading colony independent of the London merchant-financiers. Also included in the group were Raleigh Gilbert, a son of Sir Humphrey, and Sir John Popham, chief justice of the King's Bench; Sir John had played a leading role in procuring the charter. The Plymouth Company dispatched an exploratory expedition in October 1606, and sent colonists to America in May 1607 under Raleigh Gilbert and George Popham, a relative of Sir John. A settlement was established on the Kennebec River in what is now Maine, but because of a severe winter and poor crops, and the death of the two Pophams, the colony was abandoned in September 1608. Thereafter the Plymouth Company did not attempt further colonization, but concentrated on the Newfoundland fisheries and some fur trade.
The London Company for South Virginia was composed of members of leading political families. The leading member was the ubiquitous Sir Thomas Smith, the leader of the group that had purchased trade rights from Raleigh, and the governor of the East India, Muscovy, and Levant companies. Other leading members were: the Reverend Richard Hakluyt; Robert Rich, Earl of Warwick, a leader in the monopoly-chartered East India, Burma, and Guinea companies; and the leading London merchants involved in the Muscovy, Levant, and East India companies. And just as the Levant Company had been founded by members of the Muscovy Company, and a quarter of the stockholders in the East India Company were members of the Levant Company, so over one hundred members of the East India Company were now investors in the London Virginia Company, a main purpose of which was to provide a source of raw materials, such as tropical products, spices, and furs. Another prominent member in the London Company was Sir Edwin Sandys, a prominent Puritan and friend of a royal favorite, the Earl of Southampton.
The London Virginia Company sent forth its first settlers in December 1606; they were carried then as in succeeding years on ships provided by privileged favorites. The crucial question then becomes: Will the land pass after a time into the hands of the settlers, or will it remain permanently in the hands of privileged overlords dominating the settlers?
England, the major sovereign over the lands of North America, had been subjected to feudalism since at least the Norman Conquest of the 11th century. After the conquest of England in 1066, the conquerors parceled out large tracts of land to the ownership of their leading warlords, and this newly created nobility became the liege lords of the subdued peasantry. Since the overwhelming mass of Englishmen were still engaged in agriculture, feudalism became the crucial fact about English - as well as other European - society. The major attributes of the feudal system were: the granting of huge estates to landowning warlords, the coerced binding of the peasants (serfs) to their land plots, and hence to the rule of their lords, and the further bolstering by the state of feudal status through compulsory primogeniture (the passing on of the estate to the oldest son only) and entail (prohibiting the landowner from alienating - selling, breaking up, etc. - his land). This process froze landlordship in the existing noble families, and prevented any natural market or genealogical forces from breaking up the vast estates.
But after the late 14th century, the serfdom aspect of feudalism began a steady decline in England, as compulsory labor service imposed on the peasants began to be commuted permanently into money rents ("quitrents," which quit or freed one of the onerous obligations of feudal - including military - service). By the early 17th century, however, feudal military service had not been abolished, and the two other aspects of feudalism - primogeniture and entail - remained intact.
An important specific spur to imposing feudalism on the colonies of the New World was England's experience in subjugating Ireland. In the process of conquering Ireland during the 16th century, the English concluded that the "wild Irish" were no better than "Savages" and "unreasonable beasts" and hence could be treated as such - a significant preview of English treatment of the American Indian. As a result, the English decided that, as in Ireland, a colony had to be "Planted" under direction of a central monopoly organization run along military lines; they also decided to favor imposing on a colony a system of feudal land tenure. It was no coincidence that the leaders in the early English colonizing projects in America had almost all been deeply connected with the planting of Englishmen (largely a supposed surplus of poor) and feudal landownership in Ireland. Indeed, many of the active incorporators of the Virginia Company had substantial interests in Irish plantations.[3]
As recently as 1603, in fact, a crushing defeat of the Irish had spurred renewed colonization in Ulster by the English government. The hapless Irish peasants were declared to have no rights in owning land; instead, their lands were handed over by the Crown in large grants to privileged courtiers and monopoly companies, all enjoying feudal powers over the new domain.
The Irish were deliberately exterminated or driven off their land, and the vacant lands compulsorily planted with an alleged surplus of English poor, who were now little better than serfs. The treatment of the Irish and Ireland provided a directly illuminating model for the gentlemen colonizing in Virginia.
That the first English settlements in the New World were organized not directly by the Crown, but by private monopoly companies, meant that the proprietary company would be interested in subdividing its granted land as quickly as possible to the individual settlers, in order to reap a rapid gain for its shareholders. The situation was of course not that of the free market; if it were, the British government would (a) have refrained from claiming sovereignty over the unused American domain, or especially (b) have granted ownership of the land titles to the actual settlers rather than to the company. The privileges to the chartered companies, however, did not prove disastrous in the long run: the companies were eager to induce settlers to come to their granted land and then dispose of the land to them at a profit. The cleansing acid of profit was to dissolve incipient feudalism and land monopoly. It is true that the fact of the land grant to the company engrossed the land for a time, and raised its price to the settlers, thus restricting settlement from what it would have been under freedom; but the quantitative effects were not very grave.[4]
Liberty vs Power in EuropeandEngland
by
Murray N. Rothbard


Here is a mention of both Smyth and Humphrey. Humphrey was one of the 24 elected.
July 5.— Letter read from Wm. Addames, dated Japan, 12th Jan. 1613, [see No. 630,] an Englishman, who went forth 16 years ago, as pilot–major with the Hollanders, and has continued at Japan ever since, being in great favour with the emperor. He desires to see some English shipping in those parts, and gives an account of the commodities to be bought and sold there, acknowledges the Company's charitable affection towards his wife, which he is ready to repay, and will strive to do the Company service; hopes to procure leave from the emperor to return in some of their shipping. Also letter read from Sophony Cozucke, dated in Succadana, 17th July 1613, with an account of a beneficial trade to be had in the river of Landak for diamonds and gold, by making a fortification in a small island in the river, the only place whence all the principal diamonds are brought. Also letters from Wm. Sheppard, factor, dated from Bantam, 14th Dec. 1613, containing particulars of the sale and delivery of goods to Capt. Best; from Edward Cristian dated at Tecoe, in Sumatra, 27th Oct. 1613, with an account of his voyage to Bantam, the loss of Sir Henry Middleton, the Trades Increase and most of his men, and his intended voyage to the Moluccas; and from Peter Floris, Thos. Essington, and Adam Denton, factors, relating the progress of their voyage, and the settling of two factories, one at Slam and the other at Patani. Sir Thos. Smythe's account of the proceedings of certain grocers as to the purchase of a large quantity of pepper from the Dragon; also of the gallant conduct of Captain Best in fighting, with a ship and a pinnace against four galleons, and as many frigates. Sir Thos. Smythe, excuses himself from being chosen governor, on account of his long service, his age and health; but he, Sir John Watts, Sir Thos. Lowe, Sir Dudley Diggs, and Alderman Cokayne being nominated, is elected governor; Wm. Greenwell, deputy, although he wished to be excused; Wm. Harrison, treasurer, and the following committees:—

Robt. Middleton.     Hump. Basse.
Robt. Offley.     Raphe Freeman.
Robt. Bell.     Reyn. Greene.
Robt. Johnson.     Wm. Burrell.
Morris Abbott.      Wm. Stone.
Thos. Westwray.     Jeof. Kirbie.
Lawr. Greene.     Hum. Smyth.
Edward James.     Robt. Bateman.
Hump. Handforde.     Hugh Hamersley.
Christ. Cletherowe.     Nich. Leat.
Robt. Salmon.     Hen. Garraway.
Nich. Crispe.     Wm. Hallyday.

Here is the original group meaning that Humphrey knew all of these people:

1601,
March 21,
to
1602,
April 26.     288. Names of those to whom “Bills of Adventure” have been to sealed in the East India Company, with the date of the bill of adventure and the amount. [Unless otherwise expressed, the sum April 26. subscribed by each adventurer is 240l., which includes the bill and supplies; the total amount is 62,880l.]
     Stephen Hodgson.     Henry Poulsteede.
Wm. Angel.     Fras. Barker.
Roger Hemyng.     Rich. Washer.
John Eldred, 600l.     John Hodgson.
Hump. Myllward.     Hump. Basse.
Richard Hearne.     Wm. Wollastone.
Robt. Pennington.     Hump. Wallcott.
Thos. Talbott.     John Newman.
Roger Ofielde, 360l.     Sam. Armitage.
John Stoackly.     Henry Bridgeman.
William Megges.     Wm. Bonde.
John Couchman.     Thos. Horton.
William Adderley,     John Swynerton, 360l.
Bart. Holland.     Robt. Waldoe.
Richard Humble.     Hump. Style.
Thos. Boothby.     Thos. Farrington.
And. Chamberlain.     Wm. Cotton.
Robt. Offeley.     Edmond Nicholson.
Eliz. Mosley.     Raphe Gore, 360l.
Thos. Southacke.     Oliver Style. 560l.
Wm. Quarles.     Richard Bellca.
Reynolde Greene.     Richard Piott.
Lawrence Waldoe.     Robt. Myldmay.
Raphe Buzby.     John Buzbridge.
Wm. Ferrers.     Robt. Coxe.
Wm. Bonham.     Richard Pierce.
Thos. Juxon.     Richard Ball.
Thos. Shipton.     Robt. Cobbe.
Edw. Barker, 300l.     George Coles.
Geo. Whitmore.     Robt. Bucke.
Thos. Bramby(?)     Richard Hale.
Wm. Hale.     Thos. Cambell, 360l.
Wm. Greenwell.     John Watts, 600l.
Robt. Johnson.     George Bowles, 300l.
And. Bannyng.     Sir John Hart, 600l.
Thos. Hewitt.     Ald. Edw. Holmden, 1,200l.
Robt. Middleton.     Sir John Spencer, 360l.
Wm. Stoane, 600l.     Ald. Robt. Sampson, 360l.
Wm. Cavendishe.     Wm. Offley, 300l.
Samuel Hare.     John Middleton.
Edmund Spencer.     Nicholas Peird.
Morrice Llewellin.     Giles Parsloe.
Nich. Barnesly.     Edmund Scott.
John Hewitt.     Edward Barkham.
John Cornelius.     Anthony Stratford.
James Turner.     Augustine Skinner.
Thos. Barbar.     Ambrose Wheeler.
Rich. Poyntell.     Anthony Mosley.
Jas. Deane, 360l     Thos. Richardson.
Thos. Westwray.     Wm. Burrell.
Rowland Backhouse.     Thos. Lydall.
Barth. Barnes.     Sam. Backhouse.
Ellis Crispe.     Rich. Barrett.
Richard Clarke.     Peter Helinge.
Raphe Hamor.     Nicholas Lynge.
John Hawkins.     Jas. Lancaster.
Thos. Henshawe.     Wm. Hynde.
Thos. Garway.     James Dunkin.
Thos. White.     George Bennett.
Geo. Chandlor.     Edward Walker.
Robt. Bateman.     Robt. Stratford.
Thos. Bostocke.     Gregory Allen.
John Clinche.     Edward Harrison.
Nicholas Leate.     Wm. Turner.
Robt. Sandy, 260l     Thos. Ball.
Rich. Wiseman, 600l.     Edward Latterfeild
Hughe Crompton.     Anthony Gibson.
John Wolstenholme.     Robert Bell.
Robt. Gore.     Rich. Ironsyde.
John Leman.     Nich. Manley.
Alphonsus Fowle.     Wm. Chambers.
Wm. Romney.     Wm. Millett.
John Fletcher.     Wm. Freeman.
Morris Abbot.     Wm. Albany.
Richard Tailbye.     Jeffery Kirby.
John Cason.     Robt. Key.
Thos. Alabaster.     Thos. Symonds.
Nicholas Pearde.     Simon Lawrence.
Thos. Smythe, 360l.     Nicholas Crispe.
Roger Howe "     Bart. Haggett.
John Westwray "     Wm. Smythe.
Edward Leeninge "     Lewis Pope.
Rich. Bowdler.     Jeremy Davers, 200l.
Robt. Ducy.     Wm. Allen, "
Robt. Brooke.     Thos. Heyes, "
Robt. Carrell.     Wm. Palmer, "
Rich. Deane.     Wm. Starkye, "
Richard Cocks.     Thos. Marshe, "
Nicholas Farrer.     Raphe Allen, "
Jas. Cullimore.     Richard Chamberlain.
John Harby.     Richard Champion.
Roger Cotton.     Robt. Chamberlain.
Robt. Bayly.     George Chamberlain.
George Cater.     Francis Evington.
Rich. Wyche.     John Morrice.
Wm. Dale.     Richard Staper, 800l.
Rich. Burrell.     John Jackson.
Leonard White.     Wm. Kellett.
George Holman.     Robt. Robinson.
Henry Archer.     John Watts.
Stephen Harvy.     Christ. Cletherowe.
Joseph Salbanke.     Hugh Hamersley.
John Fryer.     Eliz. Mosley.
Wm. Wastall.     Geo. Dorrington.
Hump. Handford.     Nich. Salter.
Wm. Fysher.     Rich. Wragge.
Henry Robinson.     John Wragge.
Hump. Robinson.     Wm. Jennyngs.
Wm. Harrison.     Richard Gosson.
John Greene.     Ald. Leon. Hallyday, 1,440l.
John Humphrey.     Roger Style, 40l.
Hump. Smithe.     Earl of Cumberland, 500l.
Roger Dye.     Countess of Cumberland, 50l.
Wm. Cater.     Rich. Persons, 200l.
Fras. Taylor.     Ald. Leon. Hallyday, assigned to him by the Earl of Cumberland, 230l.
John Coombe.
Wm. Palmer.
John Highlorde.     Ald. Moore, 480l.
Robt. Ducy.     Christ. Nicholls.
Henry Butler, 200l.     
     —[Four pages. Court Bk., E. I. Comp., Vol. I., pp. 105, 106.].4 
Will*13 May 1616 He left a will on 13 May 1616 at London, England, Will was proved June 6 1616 by his widow Mary Basse, relict and executrix. Mentions children and among others Thomas Hobson.
The will of Humphrey Basse
In the name of God amen the thirteenth daye of
Maye Anno Domini one thowsand six hundred and sixteene and in the yeres of the
raigne of oure soveraigne Lorde James by the grace of god of England Scotlande
Fraunce and Ireland kynge defender of the faithe etc that ys to saye of England France
and Ireland the fourteenthe and of Scotland the nyne and fortithe I Humphrey Basse
citizen and girdler of London beyng at this present somewhat sicke in bodye but of good
and perfect mynde and memorye (thankes be given to Almightie god) do make and declare
this my last will and testament in manner and forme folowing that is to saye First and
principallie I commende my soule into the handes of Almightie god my creator trusting
and steadfastlie beleving by and thoroughe the merittes deathe and passion of Jesus Christe my
Savyoure and Redemer to have free remission of all my synnes: And after this transitorye
life ended to inherit the kingdom of heaven Item I will my bodye to the earthe to be
buryed in suche manner and with suche funeralls aswell for mourninge apparrell as other-
-wise in all thinges as my executrix hereafter named shall in her discretion thinke meete
Item I will that all suche debtes as I shall justlie and trulie owe to any person or persons
at the tyme of my decease shalbe payed by myne executrix within as shorte tyme after my
decease as convenientlie may be. Item my will and mynde ys that all and singular my goodes
chattells leases houshould stuffe wares marchandize plate money debtes and all other
my moveable estate which I shall have or be possessed of at the tyme of my decease shalbe equallie
parted and devided into three equall partes and portions according to the laudable custome of the
citie of London One third parte whereof I will and bequeathe to Mary my welbeloved wife
One other third parte thereof I will and bequeathe to my sonnes Nathaniell Richard Samuell
Humfrey and Luke And to my daughters Hester Abigall and Sara equallie amongest them to
be parted and devided And the other third parte thereof I will shall remayne and be reserved
by payment of suche legaceys and performance of suche other uses as are hereafter in this my
last will given and appoynted But whereas I have allreadye in my life tyme given
unto my said sonne Nathaniell Basse the somme of fower hundred poundes for and in parte of such
portion as is or shalbe due unto hym by the custome of the said citie after my decease11 The margin contains the following words, which are to be inserted here: ‘my will and minde is that the same some of fower hundred poundes shalbe and shalbe reckned as parte and parcell of such ratable parte and portion as shall anie waie accrue or be due unto him after my decease by the custome of the saide cittie’. out
of or by the saied third parte of my sayed goodes and estate so to be equallie parted and devided
amongest my saied children as aforesayed And that he the saied Nathaniel Basse shall
have only so muche more in money or other valuable substance payed and delivered unto hym
by my executrix as shall make up the same somme of fower hundred poundes one full childes parte
and as muche as any of my saied children are to have by the custome of the saied citie of or by the
sayed third parte and not otherwise And whereas also I have allreadie in my life tyme given unto my
sayed sonne Richard Basse the somme of three hundred poundes for and in parte of suche portion
as ys or shalbe due unto hym by the custome of the sayed citie after my decease my will and mynde
allso ys that the saied somme of three hundred poundes shall be and shalbe reckoned as parte and p[ar]c[el]
of suche rateable parte and portion as shall any waye accrewe or be due unto hym after my
decease by the custome of the saied citie out of or by the sayed third parte of my sayed goodes
and estate so to be equallie parted and devyded amongest my saied children as aforesayed And
that he the saied Richard Basse shall have only so muche more in money or other valuable substance
payed or delivered unto hym as shall make up the sayed somme of three hundred poundes one full
childes parte and as muche as any of my sayed children are to have after my decease by the
custome of the sayed citie of or by the sayed third parte and not otherwise And whereas allso
I have allreadye in my life tyme given in marriage with Mary my daughter not before named
to Mr Luke Walthall her husband the somme of fyve hundred poundes for and towards her
advauncement my will and mynde ys neverthelesse that yf it happen or fall out uppon the
divident of my estate, that the severall partes or portions of my saied children do or shall
come arise or amounte unto a greater somme of money then the somme of fyve hundred poundes
That then she the saied Mary shall likewise have so muche more in money or other valuable
substance paied or delivered unto her or to the sayed Mr Walthall her husband as shall make up the
same somme of fyve hundred poundes one full childes parte and as muche as any of my sayed other
children are to have after my decease by the custome of the sayed citie out of or by the sayed
third parte of my saied goodes and estate so to be equallie parted and devided amongest my
sayed other children as aforesayed And my will and mynde allso is that yf any of my sayed
children shall happen to dye before theire portions or legaceys in this my present laste
will to them geven and bequeathed shall growe due or be payed That then the parte
portion and legacey of hym or her or them so deade shalbe equallie and indifferentlie payed
and distributed to and amongest the survivor and survivors of them. Item I give
and bequeathe to the governors of the hospitall of Bridewell towardes the releife
of the poore of or in the same hospitall the somme of tenne poundes. Item I give and
bequeathe to the poore of the parishe of St Helens London where I nowe dwell
the somme of fyve poundes to be distributed at the discretion of the churche
wardens of the same parishe. Item I give and bequeathe to the poore of the parishe of
Sainct Gabriel Fanchurche London the somme of fyve poundes to be distributed
at the discretion of the parson and churchwardens of the same parishe. Item
I give unto the poore of the parish of Westham in the countie of Essex the
somme of fower poundes to be distributed at the discretion of my executrix
hereafter named. Item I give and bequeathe unto the master and wardens or governors
of the Arte or Misterie of the Gyrdlers of London and to their successors master
and wardens of the same Arte or Misterie the somme of twentie poundes to be bestowed
in plate or otherwise employed or disposed of as the m[aste]r and wardens for the tyme being
shall thincke fitt. Item I give and bequeath unto my father in lawe M[aste]r Charles ?Pressy and to my
mother in lawe his wife to either of them a rynge of gould of the valewe of fiftie
shillinges. Item I give to me loving freind Mr Thomas Francklen a ryng of gould
of the valewe of thirtie shillings. Item I give to Mrs Elizabeth […] widowe a ryng
of goulde of the valewe of thirtie shillinges. Item I give to Abraham Busher and
his wife to ether of them a ryng of gould of the valewe of thirty shillinges
Item I give to John Busher and his wife to either of them a ryng of gould of the
valewe of thirtie shillinges. Item I give to Nathaniell Busher a ryng of gould
of the valewe of thirtie shillinges. Item I give to Jeremy Busher a ryng of gould
of the valewe of thirtie shillinges. Item I give to doctor Sampson ?Hussey a ryng
of gould of the valewe of thirtie shillinges. Item I give to Mr Luke Walthall my
sonne in lawe a ryng of gould of the valewe of fiftie shillinges. Item I give to Mr William
Willaston a rynge of goulde of the valewe of fiftie shillinges. Item I give to Mr Humfrey
Browne a ryng of goulde of the valewe of fiftie shillinges. Item I give to Richard Bogan
a rynge of goulde of the valewe of fortie shillinges. Item I give to Anthony Errington
a rynge of goulde of the valewe of fortie shillinges. Item I give to Mary Bradley
wife of Henry Bradley felmonger fyve poundes. Item I give to Mary Sumpter the nourse
nowe remayning in my house the somme of fortie shillinges. Item I give to my nourse James
?at Ham twentie shillinges. Item I give and bequeathe to my sonne Nathaniell Basse the
somme of thirtie poundes over and besides suche parte and portion as ys hereby before by
me willed and bequeathed unto hym or shalbe due unto hym after my decease by the custome
of the citie of London. Item I will and bequeathe to my sonne Richard Basse the somme
of twentie poundes over and besides suche parte and portion as ys hereby before by me willed
and bequeathed unto hym or is or shalbe due unto hym after my decease by the custome of the
sayed citie. Item I will and bequeathe unto the sayed Mary my daughter wife of the
saied Mr Luke Walthall the somme of tenne poundes over and besides suche parte or portion
as ys hereby before by me willed and bequeathed unto her or is or shalbe due unto her after my
decease by the custome of the saied citie. Item whereas my brother Thomas Basse
late deceased dyed indebted unto me in greate sommes of money as by his bondes and specialties
thereof remayning in my custodie may appeare my will and mynde ys that my executrix
shall onlie have and take of thexecutors or administrators oy my saied brother Thomas the
somme of one hundred and fiftie poundes in full payment of and for all his sayed debtes and
sommes of money owing unto me And I do hereby remitt and release his saied executors or
administrators of all the after residue which the sayed Thomas my brother oughte unto me at the
tyme of his decease So as and uppon condition that the sayed executors or administrators of
my saied brother doe and shall paye the saied somme of a hundred and fiftie poundes to my executrix
within twelve monethes next after my decease and not otherwise. Item whereas my brother
William Basse is indebted unto me in certain sommes of money my will and mynde ys
that my executrix shall onlie have and take of the somme of thirtie poundes in full payment
of and for all suche debtes and sommes of money as he dothe or shall owe unto me at the
tyme of my decease And I doe hereby remitt and forgive to hym all the rest soe as and uppon
condition that the saied William my brother doe and shall paye the saied somme of thirtie poundes
to my executrix within twelve monethes next after my decease and not otherwise Item I doe hereby
freelie remitt and forgive unto my bretheren Robert and Richard Basse theire executors
and administrators all suche debtes and sommes of money as they or either of them doe or
shall owe unto me at the tyme of my decease. The rest and residue of all the saied third parte
so by me herein before willed and appoynted to be reserved for payment of my legaceys and
performance of other uses as aforesayed I do hereby whollie give and bequeathe to the sayed
Mary my wife and to my sonnes and daughters Nathaniel Richard Humfrey Luke
Hester Abigall and Sara equallie amongest them to be parted and devided And I
do ordayne and make the saied Marye my welbeloved wife my sole and only executrix of
this my last will and testament And overseers of the same I do make and appoynt
my sonne in lawe Mr Luke Walthall Mr William Willaston Mr Humfrey Browne
and my sonne Nathaniel Basse praying them as muche as in them lyeth to see this my last
will performed and to be ayding and assisting to my saied wife in the execution and p[er]formance
of the same. And I do hereby renounce disanull and revoke all former willes or testam[en]tes
by me at any tyme heretofore made written signed or sealed. In witnesse whereof I the
sayed Humfrey Basse have to this my present testament and last will set my hand and
seale the daye and yere first above written. Humfrey Basse. Sealed subscribed declared and
published by the sayed Humfrey Basse to be his last will and testament in the presence
of us Edw[ard] ?Lowman Thomas Hobson William ?Percye

Will of Humfrey Basse, Girdler of Saint Gabriel Fenchurch, City of London

06 June 1616 PROB 11/127

Records of the Prerogative Court of Canterbury Prerogative Court of Canterbury and related Probate Jurisdictions: Will Registers Name of Register: Cope Quire Numbers: 1 - 67

1 will of many for the catalogue reference
Translation of the probate


The above-written will was proved at London before the venerable master Edward Pope, doctor of laws, surrogate of the venerable master lord John Benet, ?knight, also doctor of laws, master, guardian or commissary of the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, lawfully appointed, on the sixth day of the month of June in the year of the lord 1616 by the oath of Mary Basse, relict of the said deceased and executrix, named in the same will. To whom was committed the administration of the goods, rights and credits of the said deceased, sworn on the holy gospels to administer the same well and faithfully, etc.


Translation of the Latin in the margin on the third page of the will


On the 16th day of the month of December in the year of the lord 1617 there was issued a commission to Mary Walthall alias Basse, the natural and lawful daughter of the said deceased, sworn to administer the goods, rights and credits of the same deceased according to the tenor and effect of this will both by Mary Basse, relict and executrix of the will of the aforesaid Humphrey Basse, deceased, and by Luke Walthall, the executor of the will of the said Mary Basse, now also deceased, not fully administrating well, etc.

Here is a synopsis of the will created by Don Floyd:

Notice that some or many of the names appearing in Genevieve's will also appear in Humfrey Basse's will. An abbreviated version of Hump's will follows:
Mary Basse, widow One third of estate
Nathaniell Basse, son One of children sharing a third of estate,
Minus 400 pounds already given. Also 30 lbs extra
Richard Basse, son ` One of children sharing a third of estate
Minus 300 pounds already given. Also 20 lbs extra
Samuell Basse, son One of children sharing a third of estate
Humfrey Basse, son One of children sharing a third of estate
Luke Basse, son One of children sharing a third of estate
Hester Basse, daughter One of children sharing a third of estate
Abigall Basse, daughter One of children sharing a third of estate
Sara Basse, daughter One of children sharing a third of estate
Mary Basse, daughter One of children sharing estate, but only any
amount above 500 pounds realized in
administration of the will, 500 pounds
already given in marriage to Luke Walthall
Also 10 lbs extra
Bridewell Hospital 10 pounds
Poor of the Parish of St. Helens 5 pounds
Poor in the Parish of St. Gabriel Fenchurch 5 pounds
Poor in the Parish of Westham in the County of Essex 4 pounds
Arte or Misterie of the Gyrdlers of London 20 pounds
Mr. Charles Pressy ring of gold worth 50 shillings
Humfrey’s mother in law, Genevieve,
wife of Mr. Charles Pressy ring of gold worth 50 shillings
Mr. Thomas Francklen ring of gold worth 30 shillings
Mrs. Elizabeth, widow ring of gold worth 30 shillings
Abraham Busher ring of gold worth 30 shillings
Wife of Abraham Busher ring of gold worth 30 shillings
John Busher ring of gold worth 30 shillings
Wife of John Busher ring of gold worth 30 shillings
Nathaniell Busher ring of gold worth 30 shillings
Jeremy Busher ring of gold worth 30 shillings
Sampson Hussey, doctor ring of gold worth 30 shillings
Mr. Luke Walthall ring of gold worth 50 shillings
Mr. William Willaston ring of gold worth 50 shillings
Mr. Humfrey Browne ring of gold worth 50 shillings
Richard Bogan ring of gold worth 40 shillings
Anthony Errington ring of gold worth 40 shillings
Mary Bradley, wife of Henry Bradley, felmonger 5 pounds
Mary Sumpter, nurse 40 shillings
James, nurse 20 shillings
Wife Mary and all the children Any money left over after all administrative
expenses are paid – to be divided equally.
Thomas Basse, brother Estate of deceased Thomas Basse has to
pay only 150 lbs to the estate
of Humfrey Basse, some debt forgiven
William Basse, brother Has to pay Humfrey estate only 30 lbs,
some debt forgiven
Robert Basse, brother All debts forgiven
Richard Basse, brother All debts forgiven
Edward Lowman, Thomas Hobson, William Percye, witnesses
Don.5
WILL OF HUMPHREY BASS

Family

Mary Buscher b. circa 1568, d. 1616
MARRIAGE*1588 He married Mary Buscher, daughter of Dominick Buscher and Genevieve Clerke ?, in 1588. 
Children
Last Edited22 Jun 2011

Citations

  1. [S629] Unknown subject unknown record type, by unknown photographer, Elizabeth: April 1589, 11-20', Calendar of State Papers Foreign, Elizabeth, Volume 23: January-July 1589 (1950), pp. 211-224. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75243 Date accessed: 17 March 2011.
  2. [S629] Unknown subject unknown record type, by unknown photographer, East Indies: July 1608', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan, Volume 2: 1513-1616 (1864), pp. 176. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx basse Date accessed: 17 March 2011.
  3. [S629] Unknown subject unknown record type, by unknown photographer.
  4. [S623] English Records, online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx, http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx
  5. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.
  6. [S610] Boyd, Boyd's.

Humphrey Basse

M, #2269, b. 10 November 1599, d. 1622
Father*Humphrey Basse b. c 1564, d. 4 Jun 1616
Mother*Mary Buscher b. c 1568, d. 1616
Relationships11th great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
11th great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Christening*10 November 1599 Humphrey Basse was christened on 10 November 1599 at London, England; This was the third child named Humphrey that the couple produced. The previous two died in infancy.1,2 
 He was the son of Humphrey Basse and Mary Buscher
Death*1622 He died in 1622 at England.1 
Note*1620  This is from John Smith's account of the exploration:
The Names of the Adventurers for Virginia, Alphabetically set downe, according to a printed Booke, set out by the Treasurer and Councell in this present yeere, 1620.
Page 256 Hugh Brooker, Esquire. Ambrose Brewsey. John Brooke. Matthew Bromridge. Christopher Brooke, Esquire. Martin Bond. Gabriel Beadle. John Beadle. David Borne. Edward Barnes. John Badger. Edmund Brandvell. Robert Bowyer, Esquire. Robert Bateman. Thomas Britton. Nicholas Benson. Edward Bishop. Peter Burgoney. Thomas Burgoney. Robert Burgoney. Christopher Baron. Peter Benson. John Baker. John Bustoridge. Francis Burley, William Browne. Robert Barker. Samuel Burnham. Edward Barkley. William Bennet. Captaine Edward Brewster. Thomas Brocket. John Bullock. George Bache. Thomas Bayly. William Barkley. George Butler. Timothie Bathurst. George Burton. Thomas Bret. Captaine John Brough. Thomas Baker. John Blunt. Thomas Bayly. Richard and Edward Blunt. Mineon Burrell. Richard Blackmore. William Beck. Benjamin Brand. John Busbridge. William Burrell. William Barret. Francis Baldwin. Edward Barber. Humphrey Basse. Robert Bell. Matthew Bromrick. John Beaumont. George Barkley. Peter Bartle. Thomas Bretton. John Blount. Arthur Bromfeld Esquire. William Berbloke. Charles Beck. http://www.webroots.org/library/usahist/ghov1-09.html in 1620. 
Last Edited17 Mar 2011

Citations

  1. [S545] Stephaun Paul, Feb 5 2004.
  2. [S610] Boyd, Boyd's.

James Basse1

M, #2899, b. 14 January 1683/84
Father*Richard Basse1 b. 2 Aug 1658, d. 26 Dec 1722
Mother*Jane Bryant1 b. 17 Dec 1665, d. 14 Feb 1689/90
Relationships1st cousin 10 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
1st cousin 10 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
Birth*14 January 1683/84 James Basse was born on 14 January 1683/84 at VA.1 
 He was the son of Richard Basse and Jane Bryant.1 
Last Edited30 Nov 1999

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

John Basse

M, #2267, b. circa 1606
Father*Humphrey Basse b. c 1564, d. 4 Jun 1616
Mother*Mary Buscher b. c 1568, d. 1616
Relationships11th great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
11th great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*circa 1606 John Basse was born circa 1606 at London, England
 He was the son of Humphrey Basse and Mary Buscher
Christening14 December 1606 He was christened on 14 December 1606 at St. Helen's BISHOPGATE, London, London, St. Helen's, Bishopgate, Great Britain.1,2 
Last Edited15 May 2008

Citations

  1. [S545] Stephaun Paul, Feb 5 2004.
  2. [S610] Boyd, Boyd's.

John Basse

M, #2294, b. 14 March 1661, d. 14 March 1661
Father*John Basse Sr. b. 7 Sep 1616, d. 2 Apr 1699
Mother*Elizabeth Keziah Tucker b. c 1624, d. 4 Dec 1676
Relationships9th great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
9th great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Death*14 March 1661 John Basse died on 14 March 1661.1 
Birth*14 March 1661 He was born on 14 March 1661.1 
 He was the son of John Basse Sr. and Elizabeth Keziah Tucker
Last Edited14 Feb 2000

Citations

  1. [S467] Free African Americans, online www.freeafricanamericans.com.

John Basse

M, #2928, d. between 1820 and 1821
Father*Edward Basse b. c 1762, d. c 1802
Mother*Sarah Farmer
Relationships4th cousin 7 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
4th cousin 7 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
 John Basse was the son of Edward Basse and Sarah Farmer
Death*between 1820 and 1821 He died between 1820 and 1821 at AL

Family

Children
Last Edited1 Dec 1999

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

John Basse1

M, #3117, b. circa 1650
Father*Edward Basse1 b. 8 May 1622, d. Sep 1696
Mother*Mary Tucker1 d. b 21 Apr 1713
Relationships1st cousin 11 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
1st cousin 11 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
Birth*circa 1650 John Basse was born circa 1650.1 
 He was the son of Edward Basse and Mary Tucker.1 
Note* He He may have married and had children and one might even have been named John, but as of November 2000 no evidence of this has been found.

2008
Margot,

Glad to hear from you again.

I see nothing here that I did not reference in my John Bass of Virginia.

I am 100% convinced that John Bayes was not the father of the John Bass who married Love Harris. I am 98% convinced that John Bayes was not even closely related to said John Bass.

I know it is not interesting reading, and I know that my John Bass of Virginia does not PROVE that John Bass was the son of William Basse, but it does demonstrate that all of the documentary evidence is consistent with same, and that there is not a shred of evidence that is consistent with the contrary contention that John Bass was a son of John Bayes.

Al Bass


-----Original Message-----
From: Margot Woodrough
To: Albasspe@aol.com
Sent: Mon, 11 Feb 2008 10:12 am
Subject: FW: Edward Basse (b.1622) and son John "Bayes"
Hi Al, I looked at my database and discovered that your book is the source of my information. Can you answer this gentleman's question? Please send me a copy of your response as I am very interested.

Margot Woodrough
From: Mark Baze [mailto:mark_baze@yahoo.com]
Sent: Sunday, February 10, 2008 5:27 AM
To: margo4it@tampabay.rr.com
Subject: Edward Basse (b.1622) and son John "Bayes"

Hi Margaret,

I came across your webpage (e.g., http://margotwoodrough.com/p19.htm#i3117) and I'm wondering how reliable that the name variation of John "Bayes" is that you have for John Basse (son of Edward Basse, son of Capt. Nathaniel Basse)? I'm asking because I found an abstract (fromthe book "Abstract of North Carolina Wills Compiled" by John B. Grimes, pub. 1910, p.24) whichreads:

BAYES, EDWARD Albemarle County.
 August 8, 1696. October Court, 1696. Son: John Bayes. Daughters: Eliz., Mary and Ann Bayes. Executrix: Mary Bayes. Witnesses: Thos. Luton and Cotton Robison. Clerk of the Court: Nathl. Chevin.

[Presumably "Albemarle" County is referring to Chowan Precinct.] Theabstract of the will is giving identical family members to those you give for Edward Basse, the father of your John Basse/Bayes. Is the above Bayes will the source for the names of the children you give for Edward Basse? (And do you have a copy of the original will by any chance?)

I'm wondering if what'shappened here is that a researchermay havemistakenly assumed that because Edward Basse married a Mary and then went to the Carolinas (according to the writings in the Basse Sermon Book: http://lvaimage.lib.va.us/Bible/26371/0016.tiff) that the Edward Bayes found in the above will must be the same Edward .. . . I do see that the Basse Sermon Book is saying that Edward died in 1696, which is obviously consistent with the deathyear for the Edward Bayes of the will, but I'm still finding it very hard to believe that Edward Basse's will would have given his name as "Bayes." Is your month of death of "September" that you givefor Edward Basse based on using the intermediate month between the writing (August) and the proving (October)of the willfor Edward Bayes?

I also see where aJohn Bayes witnessed a deed 6 April 1708 in Chowan andon the same document a Richard Lewis was also a witness. (Unverified recordfrom:
http://www.woodardfamilytree.com/html/chowancounty.html) An individual who may be this same Richard Lewis was laterwilled land in Chowan Precinct called the"Bayes Plantation" by a Henry Bonner who died in 1738: "I give and bequeath all that my plantation tract, or seat of Land Lying in the precinct aforesaid commonly Called by the name of Bayes's plantation to my Grandson Richard Lewis and his hiers forever." (Unverified record from:
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~mysouthernfamily/myff/d0040/g0000039.html) I'm assuming that this "Bayes Plantation" may have been named after a Bayes family who owned it previouslyand that it was sold to Bonner prior to 1738 and that the Bayes family then moved elsewhere.

This consistent usage of the name "Bayes" is again making me think that a Basse family may be getting mixed up with a Bayes family. The similarity of the names is such that it is appealing to some researchers tothink they might be spelling variations, and I've even seen where at least one record was misrepresented to make readers think a "Bass" was being referred to when it was in fact a "Bays." I've not seen any proven examples where an actual name transformation from a Bass/Basse to a Bays/Baze or vice versa occurred. So this Edward/John situation would be the very first one - if it's true.

Thanks very much for any insight you can give.
Mark


Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.

More new features than ever. Check out the new AOL Mail.1 
Note He. 
Anecdote*2008  In 2008 No indication that this John is father of the John who married Love Harris. I am 100% convinced that John Bayes was not the father of the John Bass who married Love Harris. I am 98% convinced that John Bayes was not even closely related to said John Bass. Al Bass.1 
Last Edited9 Oct 2008

Citations

  1. [S487] John Bass, Documents MVW file.

John Basse Sr.1,2

M, #2277, b. 7 September 1616, d. 2 April 1699
Father*Nathaniel Basse b. 19 Dec 1589, d. 1655
Mother*Mary Jordan b. 1591, d. 1630
Relationships10th great-grandfather of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
10th great-grandfather of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
ReferenceB-3136
Birth*7 September 1616  On 7 September 1616 John Bass, third son of Nathaniel Basse and Mary Jordan was born September 1616, presumably in England, and came as an infant with his mother and father to the new world of Virginia. According to the Basses of the Bowers Hill community in Nansemond County, Virginia, John was the only survivor at Basses Choice of the Good Friday massacre in 1622. John's father, Nathaniel had returned to England as presumably had his mother since she died in 1630 in England. John was rescued from the carnage by Nansemond Indians and was taken to raise by them. [Please note that this is either a clarification or a conflict with the account in the previous section.] On August 14, 1638, John married a Nansemond Indian girl with the unusual name (for an Indian) of Keziah Elizabeth Tucker (1625-1676). Keziah's father was Robin The Elder. He was "King" or "Chief" (Weroance) of the Nansemonds.2,3,4 
 John Basse Sr. was the son of Nathaniel Basse and Mary Jordan
MARRIAGE*14 August 1638 He married Elizabeth Keziah Tucker, daughter of Robin the elder Tucker, on 14 August 1638 at New Norfolk, Nansemond, VA, "John Bass married ye dafter of ye King of ye Nansemond Nation, by name Elizabeth in Holy Baptism and in Holy Matrimonie ye 14 day of August..."2,3,5 
Death*2 April 1699 He died on 2 April 1699 at Norfolk, VA, at age 82.2,4 
Probate*19 September 1699 His estate was probated on 19 September 1699 at VA Estate of John Basse. Inventory - mentions Bible and sermon book among personal possessions. The sermon book is housed in Virginia archives. The Bible was said to be in possession of Justin Bass a son of Late Jesse L. Bass, Yadkin, Va. (1961). No one seems to know the whearabouts of the Bible. The Bible that was printed in 1725 would of course bear information that was at least sefventy years old so it's reasonable to suppose that the older bible entries were copied from the more contemporary Sermon book that bore the Name of Nathaniel Bass and Thomas Jordan. 
Name Variation Letter A inserted only for identification purposes. It is NOT PART of his name.3 
Anecdote1622  In 1622 According to the Basses of the Bowers Hill community, John was the only survivor at Basses Choice of the Good Friday massacre. John's parents were in England at the time. There are stories that John was rescued from the carnage by Nansemond Indians and was taken to raise by them. This seems plausible since he married an Indian girl.6 
Anecdote1999  The Bass family that descended from John who married Keziah, an Indian, mostly married whites and became part of the white community. However, descendants of their son, William married African Americans and became part of that community.

http://files.usgwarchives.net/il/montgomery/bios/bassefam.txt
The above site says that John inheirited the Bible that belonged to Nathaniel Basse.7 
Biography*1999  At Isle of Wight County, VA, Oliver L. Perry, Sr. has provided summaries of his research on the Basse family and the Nansemond Indians to the Isle of Wight Museum. He has proved conclusively that several of Nathaniel Basse's sons (John, who married a Christianized Nansemond Indian; William, who married Sarah Batten and had a son, William; Edward, who went to Chowan County, North Carolina; and George Basse, born in 1628 and died in 1683 and Genevieve and Anne, twin daughters who married Peter Knight and Thomas Burwell of Isle of Wight County, lived in this area. There are many descendants of John Basse and Keziah Elizabeth.8 
Anecdote*1999  According to a History of Isle of Wight County Virginia, "The Nansemond Indians live again. They never really died out but it took Oliver L. Perry, Sr. two years to verify things he had been told as a child. The trail began with his great grandmother's death certificate and led to a fragile old family Bible. Helen C. Rountree, an Old Dominion University anthropologist, helped Perry find the Bible. The Bible documented the 1638 marriage of an Englishman, John Basse to Keziah Elizabeth Tucker, daughter of the King of the Nansemond Indian Nation. Stuck in the Bible was a copy of a Norfolk County Circuit court paper certifying that William Bass is of English and Indian descent and is not a Negroe (sic) nor a Mulatto as by some falsely and malitiously stated. His late mother was a vertuous woman of Indian descent lawfully begotten."8 
EMAIL*February 2000  I have since spotted a family tree writeup (can't remember where) indicated that Humphrey and Samuel were, indeed, twins. The name Algonquins was sometimes used in referring to a variety of tribes living in the area. The term Algonquin referred more to common or similar languages than it did anything else. Most of them were part of the Powhatan Confederation, which attacked the plantations in 1622 and killed 347 people. Algonquins and Powhatans are sometimes used interchangably. The Nansemonds were part of the Powhatan Confederation. Although some romantics want to say that friendly Nansemonds rescued young John Basse from being killed, it is more likely that they were in on the killing. However, just as Pocahantas had helped bring peace by her marriage to the Rolphe guy, I am speculating that Keziah's marriage to John Basse helping bring peace in 1638. The marriage -- coincidentally or not -- came about the same time that a period of peace began -- this following attacks by colonists against the Nansemonds and Warrosquoyackes. I have read of another colonist marrying an Indian -- in addition to the Basse who married Mary Tucker -- so it is possible that these marriages were either arranged or tacitly suggested (if that makes any sense). I am only speculalting. But I don't buy into the idea that John Basse married Keziah because there were no white women available. I think he may have been more interested in maintaining his scalp. Don Floyd. 

Family

Elizabeth Keziah Tucker b. circa 1624, d. 4 December 1676
MARRIAGE*14 August 1638 He married Elizabeth Keziah Tucker, daughter of Robin the elder Tucker, on 14 August 1638 at New Norfolk, VA, "John Bass married ye dafter of ye King of ye Nansemond Nation, by name Elizabeth in Holy Baptism and in Holy Matrimonie ye 14 day of August..."2,3,5 
Children
Last Edited2 Mar 2015

Citations

  1. He is called "Sr." in the Sermon Book.
  2. [S460] Basse Sermon Book.
  3. [S487] John Bass, Documents MVW file.
  4. [S635] Unknown compiler, "NC State Archives", Ancestral File.
  5. [S634] Barb Clayton, "usgwarchives", Ancestral File, Documented completely in "Book of John Basse of Norfolk Virginia housed in North Carolina State Archives.
  6. [S547] Fred Harvey Williiams, "Basse Family," e-mail to Margot Woodrough, Feb 2004.
  7. [S467] Free African Americans, online www.freeafricanamericans.com.
  8. [S461] Helen Haverty King, Isle of Wight.

Jordan Basse

M, #2297, b. 27 June 1648, d. 2 November 1651
Father*John Basse Sr. b. 7 Sep 1616, d. 2 Apr 1699
Mother*Elizabeth Keziah Tucker b. c 1624, d. 4 Dec 1676
Relationships9th great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
9th great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*27 June 1648 Jordan Basse was born on 27 June 1648 at VA
 He was the son of John Basse Sr. and Elizabeth Keziah Tucker
Death*2 November 1651 He died on 2 November 1651 at VA at age 3.1 
Last Edited30 Nov 1999

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Keziah Basse

F, #2300, b. 4 September 1643
Father*John Basse Sr. b. 7 Sep 1616, d. 2 Apr 1699
Mother*Elizabeth Keziah Tucker b. c 1624, d. 4 Dec 1676
Relationships9th great-grandaunt of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
9th great-grandaunt of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*4 September 1643 Keziah Basse was born on 4 September 1643 at VA.1 
 She was the daughter of John Basse Sr. and Elizabeth Keziah Tucker
Last Edited30 Nov 1999

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Keziah Basse1

F, #2901, b. 30 November 1687
Father*Richard Basse1 b. 2 Aug 1658, d. 26 Dec 1722
Mother*Jane Bryant1 b. 17 Dec 1665, d. 14 Feb 1689/90
Relationships1st cousin 10 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
1st cousin 10 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
Birth*30 November 1687 Keziah Basse was born on 30 November 1687 at VA.1 
 She was the daughter of Richard Basse and Jane Bryant.1 
Last Edited30 Nov 1999

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Keziah Basse1

F, #2932
Father*Edward Basse1 b. c 1762, d. c 1802
Mother*Sarah Farmer1
Relationships4th cousin 7 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
4th cousin 7 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
Birth* Keziah Basse was born Note the persistant use of this name that came from the Indian wife of John Bass five generations earlier!1 
 She was the daughter of Edward Basse and Sarah Farmer.1 
MARRIAGE* She married John Cox
Married Name Her married name was Cox. 

Family

John Cox
Last Edited1 Dec 1999

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Keziah Basse1

F, #2942
Father*John Basse1 d. bt 1820 - 1821
Relationships5th cousin 6 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
5th cousin 6 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
 Keziah Basse was the daughter of John Basse.1 
Last Edited1 Dec 1999

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Lidea Basse

F, #2303, b. 15 May 1608, d. 26 January 1609
Father*Humphrey Basse b. c 1564, d. 4 Jun 1616
Mother*Mary Buscher b. c 1568, d. 1616
Relationships11th great-grandaunt of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
11th great-grandaunt of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Christening*15 May 1608 Lidea Basse was christened on 15 May 1608.1 
 She was the daughter of Humphrey Basse and Mary Buscher
Death*26 January 1609 She died on 26 January 1609 at London, St. Helen's, Bishopgate, Great Britain, This is her burial date.1,2,3 
Last Edited15 May 2008

Citations

  1. [S545] Stephaun Paul, Feb 5 2004.
  2. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.
  3. [S610] Boyd, Boyd's.

Luke Basse

M, #2266, b. May 1613, d. 1654
Father*Humphrey Basse b. c 1564, d. 4 Jun 1616
Mother*Mary Buscher b. c 1568, d. 1616
Relationships11th great-granduncle of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
11th great-granduncle of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*May 1613 Luke Basse was born in May 1613 at England. 
 He was the son of Humphrey Basse and Mary Buscher
Christening5 May 1613 He was christened on 5 May 1613 at London, England
Death*1654 He died in 1654 at VA He is the subject of an estate deposition in 1654. Deposition indicates tht he died in Virginia. 
Note*13 May 1616  He is mentioned in his father's will. on 13 May 1616 at London, England
Last Edited24 Jul 2006

Mary Basse

F, #2276, b. 25 January 1595, d. after 1620
Father*Humphrey Basse b. c 1564, d. 4 Jun 1616
Mother*Mary Buscher b. c 1568, d. 1616
Relationships11th great-grandaunt of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
11th great-grandaunt of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Christening*25 January 1595 Mary Basse was christened on 25 January 1595 at London, England.1 
 She was the daughter of Humphrey Basse and Mary Buscher
MARRIAGE*12 February 1610 She married Luke Walthall on 12 February 1610 Marriage license issued by the Bishop of London to Mary Basse, spinster to marry at St. Giles in the Fields Middlesex County.1,2,3 
Death*after 1620 She died after 1620 She died after 1620 as she was mentioned in her grandmother's will of 1620. 
Married Name12 February 1610  As of 12 February 1610,her married name was Walthall.1 
Note*13 May 1616  On 13 May 1616 at London, England, She was mentioned in her father's will and later became administrator when her mother the original executrix died. 
BUSINESS*1618 She was in business May 19-23.      356. Court Minutes of the East India Company. Christopher Farewell's bonds for "true service" to be cancelled. There being many points unfit to be divulged in the letters from Persia which both the Spaniards and the Hollanders will be ready to take advantage of, the Committee only to be allowed to read them. Letter read from Aleppo, that the delay of Connok's previous letters was caused by his sending them by way of Marseilles ; also of the danger of sending the two Arabs according to Connok's advice. Discussion whether in the letter from his Majesty to the King of Persia, the King's kindness in offering to give credit to his Majesty's subjects for 2,000 or 3,000 bales of silk, should not be acknowledged. A pinnace of 130 or 140 tons, and not to draw more than 11 feet of water and of extraordinary length, to carry good ordnance "for offence," to be built for the coast of Persia. A Committee to appear before the Privy Council concerning Sir James Cunningham's business. Request of Mrs. Walthall to sell 100l. of her husband's adventure in the first joint stock, referred. Petition of Nathaniel Basse about brokerage. Petition of divers poor men of Blackwall, Ratcliffe, and Limehouse for employment and to be relieved from the opposition of the porters of London. Petition of Eliza, wife of John Noble and a prisoner with the Turks, for payment of certain debts. The lease of Leadenhall to be sealed by the Company. May 23.-Permission to Mary Walthall to pass over 100l. of her late husband's adventure in the first joint stock to the account of Humphrey Browne. [Two pages. Court Bk., IV., 175-177.] in 1618. 

Family

Luke Walthall b. 25 October 1590, d. 22 July 1616
MARRIAGE*12 February 1610 She married Luke Walthall on 12 February 1610 Marriage license issued by the Bishop of London to Mary Basse, spinster to marry at St. Giles in the Fields Middlesex County.1,2,3 
Children
Last Edited26 Sep 2009

Citations

  1. [S545] Stephaun Paul, Feb 5 2004.
  2. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.
  3. [S610] Boyd, Boyd's.

Mary Basse

F, #2293, b. 14 June 1623
Father*Nathaniel Basse b. 19 Dec 1589, d. 1655
Mother*Mary Jordan b. 1591, d. 1630
Relationships10th great-grandaunt of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
10th great-grandaunt of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
WOODROUGH KIDLET ANCESTORS
Birth*14 June 1623 Mary Basse was born on 14 June 1623 I do not know if she was born in London or Virginia.1 
 She was the daughter of Nathaniel Basse and Mary Jordan
Last Edited19 Jun 2006

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Mary Basse1

F, #2906, b. 16 August 1709
Father*Richard Basse1 b. 2 Aug 1658, d. 26 Dec 1722
Mother*Mary Burwell1
Relationships1st cousin 10 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
1st cousin 10 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
Birth*16 August 1709 Mary Basse was born on 16 August 1709 at Norfolk, VA.1 
 She was the daughter of Richard Basse and Mary Burwell.1 
Last Edited30 Nov 1999

Citations

  1. [S1] Bass Family, Book, 1961 State Archives of Georgia.

Mary Basse

F, #2933
Father*Edward Basse b. c 1762, d. c 1802
Mother*Sarah Farmer
Relationships4th cousin 7 times removed of Stephens Blakely Woodrough Jr.
4th cousin 7 times removed of Page Annette Woodrough
ChartsWilliam Basse
WILLIAM BASSE
 Mary Basse was the daughter of Edward Basse and Sarah Farmer
MARRIAGE* She married Britton Hood
Married Name Her married name was Hood. 

Family

Britton Hood
Last Edited1 Dec 1999