Elizabeth Ogle

F, #2446, b. 18 June 1725
Father*Thomas Ogle b. c 1672, d. s 1734
Mother*Elizabeth Graham d. 18 Sep 1734
Birth*18 June 1725 Elizabeth Ogle was born on 18 June 1725 My distant Grandmother was "Elizabeth OGLE" born 18 June 1725. She married "Joseph McDonald" on 17 February 1754 in Wilmington, New Castle County, Delaware. She died in 1795 in Montgomery County, Virginia and buried in the Bane Cemetery their.
She is the daughter of "Thomas OGLE" born circa 1669 in New Castle, Delaware. He was married to "Elizabeth Graham" in 1720 in New Castle, Delaware. She died in 1734. Thomas OGLE died 13 July 1734 in Ogletown, New Castle County, Delaware. They had six (6) children. Thomas OGLE was married first to Mary Crawford, daughter of Dr. James and Judith Crawford. They had seven (7) children.
Thomas OGLE was the son of the immigrant to America "John OGLE and wife Elizabeth Petersdatter". They had 4 known children, A) Thomas, B)- William, C)- Mary and D)- John, who married Elizabeth Robinson.
John OGLE was baptized on 30 September 1649 in Berwick-upon-Tweed, England. He married Elizabeth Petersdatter, the daughter of Peter Jochimson and Ella Olofsdatter, circa 1668 in New Castle, Delaware (then known as Colony of Pennsylvania.) JOHN OGLE died before 19 February 1683 in New Castle, Delaware.
John OGLE is the son of "Captian John OGLE and Eleanor PRINGLE". Capt. John OGLE was born circa 1621 in Englingham, England and died in Northumberland, England before 11 June 1686.
John OGLE (1621-1686) was the son of "Captian Henry OGLE" born 19 July 1600 in Englingham, England and died circa 1669 their. He married "Jane Forster".
He was the son of "Luke OGLE" who married Isabella, daughter of Edm. Craster. Luke OGLE died 29 October 1604 in St. Nicholas Church, England.
I have data on this OGLE family back to Humphrey OGLE, 1085-1155, the son of de OGLE, 1055-1125, and would like to exchange data on this early OLGE family with anyone interested. You can write me at: James Erwin Kunkle, PO Box 140460, Edgewater, Colorado-80214-0460, or e-mail me direct to jekunkle@uswest.net and I'd love to visit about out Old OGLE lines. This OGLE family owned Slaves in Maryland, and I have some descending records on the Black Ogles, on down to living Black Ogles today, one of which was a fellow employee with me for years. Warmest Regards, James E. Kunkle, Denver, Retired.


 
 She was the daughter of Thomas Ogle and Elizabeth Graham
Note* She My distant Grandmother was "Elizabeth OGLE" born 18 June 1725. She married "Joseph McDonald" on 17 February 1754 in Wilmington, New Castle County, Delaware. She died in 1795 in Montgomery County, Virginia and buried in the Bane Cemetery their.
She is the daughter of "Thomas OGLE" born circa 1669 in New Castle, Delaware. He was married to "Elizabeth Graham" in 1720 in New Castle, Delaware. She died in 1734. Thomas OGLE died 13 July 1734 in Ogletown, New Castle County, Delaware. They had six (6) children. Thomas OGLE was married first to Mary Crawford, daughter of Dr. James and Judith Crawford. They had seven (7) children.
Thomas OGLE was the son of the immigrant to America "John OGLE and wife Elizabeth Petersdatter". They had 4 known children, A) Thomas, B)- William, C)- Mary and D)- John, who married Elizabeth Robinson.
John OGLE was baptized on 30 September 1649 in Berwick-upon-Tweed, England. He married Elizabeth Petersdatter, the daughter of Peter Jochimson and Ella Olofsdatter, circa 1668 in New Castle, Delaware (then known as Colony of Pennsylvania.) JOHN OGLE died before 19 February 1683 in New Castle, Delaware.
John OGLE is the son of "Captian John OGLE and Eleanor PRINGLE". Capt. John OGLE was born circa 1621 in Englingham, England and died in Northumberland, England before 11 June 1686.
John OGLE (1621-1686) was the son of "Captian Henry OGLE" born 19 July 1600 in Englingham, England and died circa 1669 their. He married "Jane Forster".
He was the son of "Luke OGLE" who married Isabella, daughter of Edm. Craster. Luke OGLE died 29 October 1604 in St. Nicholas Church, England.
I have data on this OGLE family back to Humphrey OGLE, 1085-1155, the son of de OGLE, 1055-1125, and would like to exchange data on this early OLGE family with anyone interested. You can write me at: James Erwin Kunkle, PO Box 140460, Edgewater, Colorado-80214-0460, or e-mail me direct to jekunkle@uswest.net and I'd love to visit about out Old OGLE lines. This OGLE family owned Slaves in Maryland, and I have some descending records on the Black Ogles, on down to living Black Ogles today, one of which was a fellow employee with me for years. Warmest Regards, James E. Kunkle, Denver, Retired.


 
Married Name17 February 1754  As of 17 February 1754,her married name was McDonald. 
Last Edited12 Nov 2007

Elizabeth Ogle

F, #2536, b. 16 October 1785
Father*Major Benjamin Ogle b. 13 Jan 1746, d. 6 Sep 1813
Mother*Rebecca Stilley d. 22 Nov 1821
Birth*16 October 1785 Elizabeth Ogle was born on 16 October 1785. 
 She was the daughter of Major Benjamin Ogle and Rebecca Stilley
Last Edited17 Aug 1994

Elizabeth Ann Rebecca Ogle

F, #2563, b. 17 April 1864, d. 19 February 1945
Father*Rezin (Pap) Horatio Ogle b. 14 Aug 1814, d. 11 May 1904
Mother*Margaret Wells b. 30 May 1830, d. 5 Mar 1899
Birth*17 April 1864 Elizabeth Ann Rebecca Ogle was born on 17 April 1864. 
 She was the daughter of Rezin (Pap) Horatio Ogle and Margaret Wells
MARRIAGE*23 April 1882 She married John Joseph Durkin on 23 April 1882. 
Death*19 February 1945 She died on 19 February 1945 at age 80. 
Biography*  Elizabeth Ann Ogle was educated at Curtis School in Georgetown, D.C. and was a gifted painter in oil as well as skilled in needlework. 
Married Name23 April 1882  As of 23 April 1882,her married name was Durkin. 

Family

John Joseph Durkin b. 10 May 1855, d. 6 May 1923
Children
Last Edited28 Aug 1998

Frank Ogle1

M, #3884, b. 1874
Father*William F. Ogle1 b. 1851
Mother*Margaret Dunn1 b. 1850
Birth*1874 Frank Ogle was born in 1874.1 
 He was the son of William F. Ogle and Margaret Dunn.1 
Last Edited16 Feb 2004

Citations

  1. [S52] 1850 Census;.

Frederick Ogle1

M, #3885, b. 1876
Father*William F. Ogle1 b. 1851
Mother*Margaret Dunn1 b. 1850
Birth*1876 Frederick Ogle was born in 1876.1 
 He was the son of William F. Ogle and Margaret Dunn.1 
Last Edited16 Feb 2004

Citations

  1. [S52] 1850 Census;.

George Ogle1

M, #2489, b. circa 1755, d. before 1767
Father*Joseph Ogle b. 1705
Mother*Sarah Winters d. c 1780
Birth*circa 1755 George Ogle was born circa 1755. 
 He was the son of Joseph Ogle and Sarah Winters
Death*before 1767 He died before 1767. 
Last Edited2 Dec 1999

Citations

  1. [S388] Unknown subject unknown repository.

George Ogle

M, #2525
Father*Thomas Ogle b. 1706, d. 23 Dec 1771
Mother*Catherine Howard
 George Ogle was the son of Thomas Ogle and Catherine Howard
Last Edited17 Aug 1994

George Ogle

M, #2619
Father*Benjamin Ogle b. 20 Nov 1715
Mother*Agnes (?)
 George Ogle was the son of Benjamin Ogle and Agnes (?) 
Last Edited17 Aug 1994

Gilbert de Ogle1

M, #2637, b. circa 1115, d. circa 1180
Father*Humphrey de Ogle b. c 1085, d. c 1155
MARRIAGE* Gilbert de Ogle married an unknown person.  
Birth*circa 1115 He was born circa 1115. 
 He was the son of Humphrey de Ogle
Death*circa 1180 He died circa 1180. 

Family

Child
Last Edited17 Aug 1994

Citations

  1. [S5] Sir Henry A. Ogle, Ogle and Bothal.

Henry Ogle1

M, #2654, d. after 1514
Father*Sir William Ogle b. 1412, d. 1472
 Henry Ogle was the son of Sir William Ogle
MARRIAGE* He married an unknown person.  
Death*after 1514 He died after 1514. 

Family

Child
Last Edited17 Aug 1994

Citations

  1. [S5] Sir Henry A. Ogle, Ogle and Bothal.

Herbert Ogle1

M, #2580
Father*John R. Ogle b. 8 Feb 1858, d. 2 Mar 1903
Mother*Annie V. Woody b. 1862
 Herbert Ogle was the son of John R. Ogle and Annie V. Woody
Last Edited17 Aug 1994

Citations

  1. [S388] Unknown subject unknown repository.

Horatio Ogle1

M, #2877, b. 19 August 1842, d. 4 October 1842
Father*Rezin (Pap) Horatio Ogle1 b. 14 Aug 1814, d. 11 May 1904
Mother*Elizabeth A. Haney1 d. 7 Sep 1851
Birth*19 August 1842 Horatio Ogle was born on 19 August 1842.1 
 He was the son of Rezin (Pap) Horatio Ogle and Elizabeth A. Haney.1 
Death*4 October 1842 He died on 4 October 1842 This death day only one day later than death of older sister Marthey. Must have been an illness going around.1 
Last Edited18 Sep 1999

Citations

  1. [S456] Mary Durkin Carey, "MDC notes."

Horatio (Horace) Ogle

M, #2538, b. circa 1789, d. 4 September 1831
Father*Major Benjamin Ogle b. 13 Jan 1746, d. 6 Sep 1813
Mother*Rebecca Stilley d. 22 Nov 1821
ChartsHerman Charles Vollmer
ReferenceB-44
Birth*circa 1789 Horatio (Horace) Ogle was born circa 1789 at Fredericktown, MD. 
 He was the son of Major Benjamin Ogle and Rebecca Stilley
MARRIAGE*4 February 1812 He married Mary Ellen Shipley on 4 February 1812 at Georgetown, Washington, D.C.. 
Burial*1831 He was buried in 1831 at Georgetown, D.C., He was buried at the Old Community Cemetery on the grounds of old Georgetown College. The following is the epitaph on his grave stone:
"Oh death, you have conquered me,I by your dart am slain, But Christ will conquer thee And I shall rise again".
The remains of those buried in the Old Community Cemetery were later removed to Georgetown University burying ground where the priests were buried to make room for building expansion at Georgetown University.1 
Death*4 September 1831 He died on 4 September 1831 at Georgetown, D.C.. 
MILITARY*1812  In 1812 Served in War of 1812 as a private in Captain Edward Edmonston's Company of Grenadiers, 1st Regiment, district of Columbia Militia..1 
Moved*1812  In 1812 at Georgetown, D.C., The Ogle family lived in Georgetown from 1812 when Horatio (Horace0 Ogle moved there from Frederick County, Md.1 
Biography*28 November 1821  On 28 November 1821 He was one of the appointed executors of the will of Rebecca Stilley Ogle and stated, "do renounce all my right of title and claim to the executorship, accordingly desiring at the same time that letters of administration be granted to Ezra Mantz of Frederick County" dated and signed November 28, 1821.
Later he moved to Georgetown and fought in the War of 1812-1814. He was educated in Frederick Maryland, but moved to Georgetown (once a part of Maryland) as an apprentice to Mr. Thomas Hyde in his tannery busniness. Mr. Hyde was a close friend of Major Benjamin Ogle. The following is taken from a letter that his sister - in-law, Catherine Clements wrote to Ambrose L. Ogle in response to a request for family information:
Well my child its a great any years since I lived with your grandfather, You must know that when sister "Polly" ( a family nick-name for Mary, married your grandfather Horace Ogle. I went to live with them. They were considered the most handsome couple in Georgetown, (now West Washington) at that time and your grandfather was I think the proudest man I ever knew.
From what I heard during the time I was living with your grandfather, his father's name was Benjamin and he kept a dry goods and general merchandise store in Frederick, Md. Your grandfather had one brother named Eli and another named Benjainin, after whom your Uncle Benjamin was named. He also had a sister whose name was Elizabeth. I do not remember having seen any of your grandfather's relations except his brother Benjamin who I think must have been the youngest child of the family. He (Benjamin) made frequent visits to Washington to see his brother Horace and I have always supposed from the earnest conversations that passed between them that there was some important business connected with the visits. What his business was, however, I never understood or at least do not remember now; but you must remember child that has been a long, long time ago -~ nigh four score years. His brother ( Benjamin) often invited your grandfather to accompany him to Fredericktown~ but he,(grandfather), seemed indignant at these invitations and often remarked that he would never ask them for anything. During the war (1812) , however, while he (grandfather) was in service, Sister Polly received regular remittances of gold coin - and my child gold was gold then - as well as provisions and clothing from ~ his people in Frederick. These remittances were kept up during Sister Polly's entire period of gestation and for some time after the birth of your. Father (Rezin). Here the old lady waxed eloquent, referring to father's birth she said: "Will I ever forget that night (August 14, 1814); there lay Sister Polly in the agonies of travail while from the window could be seen the Capitol in flame. Despite the~ efforts of the kind old doctor and dear old Aunt "Winnie~ (the nurse), it seemed impossible to exclude the lurid glare, the red streaked sky and agonizing yells of horror that0 seemed to bid defiance to paturition and the kind old doctor's effort."
(Her graphic description of this night of horror is beyond the power to depict - no pen could do it justice; not tongue could. reproduce it, unless assisted by a memory of the scene)
But my child, I have quite drifted from my theme. You must know that your grandfather left his house in Frederick under quite delicate circumstances and I trust my frank relation of them since it is by your request, will not give offense. From what I could understand your grandfather fell in love with a pretty servant girl who was at that time in his father's employ. This proud and dignified parent could never suffer their son to form a marital alliance with their domestic menial, and finding that the boy was bent, upon his purpose, and their efforts to restrain him were useless they resolved upon the plan to send him to Georgetown (West Washington) where he was bound as an apprentice to Mr. Thomas Hyde ( a former resident of Frederick and warm personal friend of his (grandfather's) father ) in the tanning and currying business. My father lived directly opposite the tannery and there it was that sister Polly first became acquainted with your grandfather, an acquaintance which ultimately ended. in their union, and this, strange to say he did precisely what his parents had endeavored to prevent him from doing , that is marrying a poor girl. Upon the death of his (Horace's) father, he went to Frederick to attend the funeral. He was mentioned as one of the executors or administrators of the will I think which I also think he declined in favor of his brother (whether this brother was Eli or Benjamin the old lady did not state and as she has now passed from earth the information is beyond ascertainment unless the testatory documents on file in Frederick would show this) His father I understood died very suddenly if indeed he was not found dead in bed. Of your grand£ather's mother I heard but very little which must have been very unimportant as I have not the slightest remembrances of any incident connected with her life, not even do I remember having heard her first name.
Your grandfather's uncle Eli also died suddenly so I understood somewhat after the mannerof his father's death, apoplexy I suppose.     -
Of your grandfather's sister Elizabeth I also know but little save that I remember having seen some specimens of the most handsome artistic- needle embroidery which bore her initials and which were said to have been executed by her. From what I could understand her mind became impaired and she was sent to place called Bethlehem or Betheney (I am not certain about the .orthography of the word, but the phonetic impression upon the ear was Beth er-ni) which at that time was celebrated for it s excellent sanitarium for the insane. I never heard whether she recovered or not but suppose (and it is simply supposition) that she died there. I believe my- child that I have related all the incidents 'that I remember, which occurred previous to the childhood of your father. What has occurred since he can as well if not better inform you than myself. You might remark to your inquiring friend Dr. Todd that I consider the Ogle Family the proudest flesh and blood I ever knew. If I can call to mind anything not here enumerated or give you any further information I will be pleased to do so at some subsequent interview.

REMARKS made by Ambrose L. Ogle regarding Catherine Clements
I found this old lady tottering beneath the cares sad sorrows of nigh four score and ten, to be one of the most remarkable personages I ever met. Congenial and pleasant, educated and refined, possessing a nice vocabulary an eloquent delivery, a most lively imagination and above all the most wonderful power to vividly portray the many interesting incidents of the past decades. Her knowledge of the past and store of general information seemed inexhaustible and I therefore feel confident that the accompanying statement contains all the information relative to the family current at the time, for in my opinion she was the most wonderful and reliable authority that could be consulted.
Yours truly, Ambrose L. Ogle.1 
Anecdote19 September 1897  On 19 September 1897 Letter Ambrose. L. Ogle Wash D. C. 9-19-1897 (These letters were in file of Dr. Todd's - appear to be miscellaneous. Dr. Todd was the researcher who was working on linking the American Ogles with the English Ogles.)
My grandfather. Horace as far as is known inherited nothing directly from his father; his sister. Elizabeth. died insane, in the Bethalem asylum his bro Eli, according his will died possessed of nothing beyond personal effects and one slave (Kate); his other brother Benjamin who died at the home of John Witherow on Tom's Creek according to his (Benj's will) died possessed of nothing beyond tools and clothes; and since their mother Rebecca died possessed according to her will of real and personal property which she willed to Horace, her only surviving child. It would seem evident that her husband. Benjamin made a will leaving all his property to her for life in trust for chn, On the other hand: we know that her husb. Benj. died suddenly (was found dead in bed)(intestate)

Letter A. L. Ogle, Wash. D. C. 12/17/1894
He has just completed "The Naked Truth" which is as its name implies a truthful story of my life and parents. Tho it is not in the nature of a history (being written in the guise of a novel) the whole constituting a series of moral essays which (pardon the vanity) cannot fail to prove beneficial to mankind, both for their literary elevation, as well as their undeniable underlying truth. If I can find apublisher etc.
1604 33rd St.(Note there is a picture of this block of houses in MVW file 1999)

Letter A. L. Ogle .8/24/1896 Wash. D.C.
I have in my possession the "quaint old mirror" of Benj. Ogle which I have endeavored to immortalize in verse in a poem entitled "The Magic Mirror" wherein in a reverie I fancy the mysterious mirror possessed the power to reflect anew the many scenes that have passed over in bygone years. It is quite a lengthy poem of which I feel somewhat Proud. Following I give an extract: (Unfortunately the document that came to MVW in 1999 did not contain the extract - MVW 12-99.) 
Anecdote*15 October 1897  On 15 October 1897 Letter from Ambrose L. Ogle (at that time bookkeeper for W.T. & F. B. Weaver, 1208. 32nd St., Washington, D. C. ).Date Oct 15, 1897 To: Dr. S S. Todd, Kansas City, ~Mo.
(Regarding my)---grandfather, Horatio, father tells me that his mother, even when in need, when left a widow by 'the early death of her husband , and that too with quite a large family, was too- independent, even though the best people of that time importuned her, to make application for a pension; and she would say: "No ~ my husband fought to maintain his country's liberty , because it was his duty - I should regard it as blood money - I wouldn't have it!" She reared her family with her needle until father was able to support his family. I remember grandmother very well, though I was exactly 4 years old on the day she died, she was buried on her 85th birthday. She was tall, stately, dignified, yet graceful, with features fine and feminine yet firm as steel. Her modesty was such that father informs me that throghout her long life he never on a single occasion saw more of her person than her bands and face,' tho he was the oldest arid she nursed every one of her children entirely upon the breast.
I can give you no personal description of grandfather Horatio but father informs me that he was 5'll~' tall and weighed about 170 to 180 lbs. He had a fair education, including Latin and some Greek; was a great lover of good books, his favorites for constant perusal being the bible, Shakespeare, Plutaechts Lives and Alexander Pope. His favorite motto to his children was "If you don't know a thing, you can, at least, keep silent." 

Family

Mary Ellen Shipley b. 10 January 1786, d. 10 January 1871
MARRIAGE*4 February 1812 He married Mary Ellen Shipley on 4 February 1812 at Georgetown, D.C.. 
Children
Last Edited26 Apr 2016

Citations

  1. [S456] Mary Durkin Carey, "MDC notes."

Horatio F Ogle1

M, #2880, b. 30 April 1847, d. 5 November 1850
Father*Rezin (Pap) Horatio Ogle1 b. 14 Aug 1814, d. 11 May 1904
Mother*Elizabeth A. Haney1 d. 7 Sep 1851
Birth*30 April 1847 Horatio F Ogle was born on 30 April 1847.1 
 He was the son of Rezin (Pap) Horatio Ogle and Elizabeth A. Haney.1 
Death*5 November 1850 He died on 5 November 1850 at age 3.1 
CENSUS1850*1850 He appeared on the CENSUS in 1850 at Washington, D.C.. 
Last Edited16 Dec 2004

Citations

  1. [S456] Mary Durkin Carey, "MDC notes."

Humphrey de Ogle1

M, #2636, b. circa 1085, d. circa 1155
Father*de Ogle b. c 1055, d. c 1125
MARRIAGE* Humphrey de Ogle married an unknown person.  
Birth*circa 1085 He was born circa 1085. 
 He was the son of de Ogle
Death*circa 1155 He died circa 1155. 

Family

Child
Last Edited17 Aug 1994

Citations

  1. [S5] Sir Henry A. Ogle, Ogle and Bothal.

James Ogle

M, #2494
Father*Captain James Ogle b. 1 Jun 1753, d. 1830
Mother*Mary Biggs
 James Ogle was the son of Captain James Ogle and Mary Biggs
Last Edited17 Aug 1994

James Ogle

M, #2532
Father*Thomas Ogle b. 1706, d. 23 Dec 1771
Mother*Catherine Howard
 James Ogle was the son of Thomas Ogle and Catherine Howard
Last Edited17 Aug 1994

James Ogle

M, #2620
Father*Benjamin Ogle b. 20 Nov 1715
Mother*Agnes (?)
 James Ogle was the son of Benjamin Ogle and Agnes (?) 
Last Edited17 Aug 1994

Captain James Ogle1

M, #2487, b. 1 June 1753, d. 1830
Father*Joseph Ogle b. 1705
Mother*Sarah Winters d. c 1780
MARRIAGE* Captain James Ogle married Mary Biggs
Birth*1 June 1753 He was born on 1 June 1753.2 
 He was the son of Joseph Ogle and Sarah Winters
Death*1830 He died in 1830 Date according to Administraction Account. 
Biography*  He was Ensign and Captain in his brother Benjamin's military company in Upper District of Frederick County, Maryland militia. When his brother was made Major, James took his place as Captain of the Frederick County Troops 4th Company.
According to Maryland Records by Brumbaugh he voted for John Tyler the Federalist candidate in the election of 1796. The election was held November 9 to 12, 1796 and there were 1,917 voters. 

Family

Mary Biggs
Children
Last Edited2 Dec 1999

Citations

  1. He is the forebear of Jean Godwin of the Ogle Society in 1999.
  2. [S373] Brumbaugh, Earliest Records All Saints.

Jane Ogle

F, #2448
Father*Thomas Ogle b. c 1672, d. s 1734
Mother*Elizabeth Graham d. 18 Sep 1734
 Jane Ogle was the daughter of Thomas Ogle and Elizabeth Graham
Last Edited17 Aug 1994

Jane Ogle1

F, #2502
Father*Thomas Ogle b. 23 Jan 1749
Mother*Sibylla Schley
 Jane Ogle was the daughter of Thomas Ogle and Sibylla Schley
Last Edited17 Aug 1994

Citations

  1. [S388] Unknown subject unknown repository.

Jane Ogle

F, #2576
Father*John R. Ogle b. 8 Feb 1858, d. 2 Mar 1903
Mother*Annie V. Woody b. 1862
 Jane Ogle was the daughter of John R. Ogle and Annie V. Woody
MARRIAGE* She married Thomas Garfield
Married Name Her married name was Garfield. 

Family

Thomas Garfield
Last Edited17 Aug 1994

Johanna Ogle

F, #2616
Father*Benjamin Ogle b. 20 Nov 1715
 Johanna Ogle was the daughter of Benjamin Ogle
Last Edited17 Aug 1994

John Ogle1,2,3

M, #2437, b. September 1649, d. before 19 February 1683
Father*John Ogle of Eglingham b. c 1621, d. s 1686
Mother*Eleanor Pringle
ChartsHerman Charles Vollmer
ReferenceB-704
Birth*September 1649 John Ogle was born in September 1649 at Berwick on Tweed, Northumberland, England. 
 He was the son of John Ogle of Eglingham and Eleanor Pringle
Christening30 September 1649 He was christened on 30 September 1649 at Berwick on Tweed, England.4 
MARRIAGE*1665 He married Elizabeth (?), daughter of Peter Jochimsson and Ella Stilley, in 1665 at New Castle, DE.5 
Death*before 19 February 1683 He died before 19 February 1683 at DE.2,6 
Biography  Http://xtinahs.org/Digitaltour/JohnOgleGrave.html

JOHN OGLE OF CHRISTIANA

John Ogle was born on September 30, 1649, at Berwick Upon Tweed, Northumberland, England to John Ogle of the same place. The elder John was from Eglingham, and in 1650 received a commission as captain of militia for the four northern counties, and the next year he was under the commonwealth a commissioner and also commanding a troop of horse in Scotland. According to Mormon Church which deals in genealogy, John was a direct descendant of King Edward the First. The Ogle?s had their own castle in Northumberland.

Young John Ogle early became aware of the difficulties which his family were likely to experience after the Restoration, and he undoubtedly had heard tales of adventures in the New World; and so when the opportunity was presented to him, John Ogle joined Colonel Nicolls' expedition, bound for America. He was a scant 14 when he joined Nicholl?s ranks.

In March 1664, the whole of the territory in America occupied by the Dutch on the Atlantic seaboard was granted by Charles II to his brother, the Duke of York, on the plea that it was British soil by right of discovery. On 25 May 1664, Colonel Nicolls, with four ships, 300 soldiers and 450 men, sailed from Portsmouth. The expedition arrived at New Amsterdam, and without firing a shot, Governor Stuyvesant surrendered the town on 29 August and promptly changed the name to New York.

Delaware had been originally settled by Swedes, who quarreled with the Dutch, who built Fort Casimir 6 miles from the Swedish Fort Christiana. In 1654 Governor Rising brought a large number of colonists from Sweden; he took Fort Casimir, renaming it Fort of the Holy Trinity, in honor of the day of capture. Governor Stuyvesant, who later came down from New Amsterdam and recaptured the fort, renamed it New Amstel.

John Ogle, who had served under Captain Carr in Delaware, became a permanent resident of White Clay Creek Hundred, named from the deposits of white clay found along its banks. John Ogle first resided at New Castle, where he was a large land-buyer; he afterwards lived at various sites on his extensive holdings. He commenced acquiring land at an early date, probably as soon as the confusion of the conquest and the settlement of Indian troubles permitted it.

The first grant that John Ogle received was in February 1666, from Governor Nicolls, who had empowered the officers of Delaware to dispose of 'implanted' land there for the best advantage of the inhabitants. This tract was 800 or 1000 acres total, including a 300 acre tract known as "Muscle Cripple". The original document omits the exact acreage, but it requires a yearly quitrent of 8 bushels of wheat, the standard being 1 bushel for each hundred acres per year. Later records record him owning 1,000 acres in Christiana, although it is unknown if it was all from the original grant or a combination of lands. The following is the wording in the Duke of York?s grant of this land:

"A Confirmation granted unto Sergeant Thomas Wollaston, John Ogle, John Hendrick, and Hermann Johnston, for a certain parcel of land in White Clay kill in Delaware River

Richard Nicholls, Esqr. &c Whereas there is a certain piece or parcel of land lying and being in White Clay kill near unto Christeen kill in Delaware River bounded to the E. with Hans Bones Plantation to the South with James Crawford's, to the North and West by a fresh creek or Run of water at the head of Bread and Cheese Island containing about (blank) acres of woodland, as also a piece of valley or meadow ground known by the name of Muscle Cripple running up the kill about (blank) of a mile which said piece or parcel of land was by the officers of Delaware who were empowered by my commission to dispose of implanted land there for the best advantage of the inhabitants granted unto Sergeant Thomas Wollaston, John Ogle, John Hendrick, and Herman Johnson, the said grant bearing date (blank) day of February 1666. Now for a confirmation unto them the said Thomas Wollaston, John Ogle, John Hendrick, and Herman Johnston, in their possession and enjoyment of the premises. Know yee that by virtue of the commission and authority to me given, I have given ratified confirmed and granted unto the said Thomas Wollaston &c. the afore recited parcels of land and premises, &c., yielding and paying therefore yearly and every year unto his Majesties use eight bushels of Wheat as a Quit Rent when it shall be demanded, by such person or persons in authority as his majesty shall please to establish and empower in Delaware River and the parts and plantations adjacent. Given under my hand and seal, at Fort James, in New York, on the Island Manhattan, the first day of August, in the 20th year of his Majesty's reign, Anno Domini, 1668."

The land as platted for Ogle was a long rectangle, lying between the north side of the Christiana Creek and the south side of the White Clay Creek. It encompasses the area currently encompassing the town of Christiana, the Christiana Mall, and the Christiana Hospital Center Complex. 39 degrees 40' 50.33 N and 75 degrees 39' 04.28 W It was bounded on the east by Hans Bones, the south by James Crawford, and the southeast by Sergeant John Erskine. The north and west were undeveloped, due to the fact that they were above the head of navigation on the streams.

The parcel known as Muscle Cripple was granted to Sgt Thomas Wollaston, John Ogle, John Hendricks and Herman Johnson. It consisted of a part of 300 acres and was bounded by a creek at the head of Bread and Cheese Island and also by the plantations of Hans Bones and James Crawford. Sgt Wollaston had been a comrade in arms, as had James Crawford of the adjoining plantation. James Crawford, having gained some knowledge of medicine in the army, was known as 'Doctor' on the early assessment rolls. His daughter Mary was later to marry into the Ogle family. Crawford was one of the heroes of the Nicolls expedition, his grant specifically stating that it was given 'in consideration of the good service performed by James Crawford, a soldier'. In addition, John Ogle purchased lands along St. George?s Creek, near the present town of Delaware City. It was on these lands to which some of his sons would later relocate. The story of John Ogle is closely bound up with that of his friends Thomas Wollaston and James Crawford, who took a liking to young Ogle and formed a friendship which continued throughout their lives. In about 1670, Ogle married Elizabeth Petersdotter.

Elizabeth Petersdotter was the daughter of Peter Jochimsson, a settler in New Sweden in the first voyage in 1642. She was born in 1654, moved from her home as a teenager to help in the household of her uncle, Anders Stille, living on Christina River. Here she met and married John Ogle, an English soldier who had participated in the English conquest of the Delaware in 1664. John and Elizabeth Ogle had two sons:

Thomas Ogle, born c. 1672, died 1734 in White Clay Creek Hundred, New Castle County; married [1] Mary Crawford, [2] widow Elizabeth Graham., John Ogle, born c. 1674, died 1720 in White Clay Creek Hundred; married widow Elizabeth Harris.

John Ogle and Rev. Jacob Fabritius were indicted in 1675 for inciting the Swedes and Finns to riot in opposition to orders of the New Castle Court to build a dike and road for Hans Block, a Dutchman. The three friends settled on nearby plantations in New Castle County, where their wives survived them. The Records of the Court of Newcastle give a picture of their lives after 1676.

An eye-witness account of the events of June 1675 has revealed something of the character of John Ogle of that period - swashbuckling, rash and reckless, with an amount of courage appropriate to the rough and tumble frontier environment. He was not one to be imposed on, especially by one of the Dutch who certainly did not amount to much in the eyes of His Majesty's soldiers. Under order of the Governor-General, the magistrates met at New Castle on 4 June 1675, and decided that it would be necessary to build a road across the marsh and to build a dyke in the marsh next to the town. Another dyke across Hans Block's marsh was also thought necessary, and the inhabitants were ordered to assist in the project by contributing labor or money. The project was strenuously opposed by the settlers because the dyke across Hans Block's marsh was an improvement to private property. John Ogle was a leader of the objectors and peremptorily informed the magistrates that no dykes at all would be built under any such unfair conditions. His objections stirred the people to great excitement in the church where the public meeting was held; and Ogle was put out of the church. Mathys Smith and the Rev. Jacobus Fabricius took up the cause and as a result Ogle and Fabricius were arrested. They were confined in a boat which was anchored nearby, where they continued their public imprecations. Excitement was high, and they were eventually released. Later Hans Block encountered Ogle on the street and was told that if the Finns had been drunk no good would have come from the incident. It was an affront to constituted authority and called for severe disciplinary measures.

Conditions in New Castle were not good at that time; carousals, fights and robberies were the order of the day, and it wasn't a safe place for a stranger. William Edmunsdon, 'a Public Friend' visiting there, found it difficult to secure lodgings, 'the inhabitants being chiefly Dutch and Finns addicted to drunkenness', who refused to take him in, even though he had money.

Special warrants were issued by the Governor against Fabricius and Ogle, who with others had signed a remonstrance. The two chief trouble makers were ordered to appear in the August Court, and the other signers before a later court. Fabricius appeared and the proceedings resulted in the unfrocking of the troublesome person; Ogle, who conveniently fell sick, failed to appear, and no further action was taken against him.

After the excitement of the summer of 1675, Ogle proceeded to acquire more land, and the tract known as Hampton, on the south side of St. George's Creek, consisting of 300 acres, was confirmed to him by Governor Andross on 5 November 1675.

New Castle court records reveal that in February 1676 Ogle accused one of the Dutch residents of stealing his heifer. As one of the jurymen was Thomas Wollaston, the outcome was predictable.

The above incident marked the beginning of a series of court proceedings which involved John Ogle and James Crawford for the rest of their lives. Ogle was an extensive producer of tobacco, and like other planters he was continually involved in financial and other difficulties. Little ready money changed hands in those days, and the barter system was the common way of doing business.

In 1675 the Governor ordered the construction of highways, and the inhabitants of New Castle and the surrounding area, and on the south side of Christiana Creek were made responsible for constructing a highway from New Castle to Red Lyon between the first of January and the end of February. The highway was to be a good passable one, twelve feet wide, and John Ogle was appointed overseer of the residents around Christiana Creek.

Various deeds of the period after 1678 record transfers of extensive tracts of land to a number of Ogle's associates; among them, Swart Neuton's Island was transferred to John Darby of Maryland, and other lands to John Test and to Augustine Dixon.

Ogle was instrumental in the construction of a bridge over the Christiana Creek on his land. "The court at New Castle in 1679 specified that certain roads were to be laid out ten feet wide, under the jurisdiction of an overseer. The inhabitants on the north side of the Christiana were ordered to clear a road to Christina Head and there erect a bridge. The head of tidewater on the Delmarva Peninsula was the preordained site of a town, so at an early date, the little hamlet that was to become Christiana Bridge had sent its roots into the soil. Higher up on the Christiana, John Ogle and the Quaker, Valentine Hollingsworth had each come into possession of 1000 acres. (Weslager 1947:39). "The area that was to become the village was originally part of a tract called "Eagle's Point" which was surveyed for John Ogle by the government of William Penn in 1683. This parcel of land was located to the north of the present-day intersection of routes 7 and 273, and contained the upland and high ground north of the modern town. Ogle (sic :Ogle's descendants) sold this parcel in 1731 to Dr. Rees Jones, a "practicioner of Physick", and a prominent individual in the village, and the land was resurveyed to Jones in 1741" (Catts 1989:22).

On 25 August 1680, Thomas Wollaston of White Clay Creek wrote a letter to John Briggs of West Jersey which he gave to John Ogle for delivery. Wollaston had a debt of three years standing against Briggs. Ogle made the journey, stopping in New York, where 27 August he made an affidavit concerning the transaction. The affidavit began: 'John Ogle, aged thirty-two or thereabouts," The incident itself is not important, but Ogle's statement of his approximate age has been of crucial importance to ogle genealogy, as without it, it would have been impossible to connect him with absolute certainty to his Northumberland Family.

John Ogle was recorded as owning 400 acres of land near New Castle, and the 1,000 acre plantation in the "Constabulary of North Christina Creek" in 1680 (Records of New Castle, II, pps 80, 83).

In November 1681 Ogle received a court order to take up 200 acres of land for each of his two sons, Thomas and John Ogle, and on 27 December 435 acres, called the 'Fishing Place', on Christiana Creek were surveyed on the warrant. On August of the following year, Northampton, a tract of 200 acres in White Clay Creek Hundred was surveyed for Ogle. On 14 October 1683 more acres in Mill Creek Hundred were surveyed for him, and on 8 December Eagles Point in White Clay Creek Hundred was also surveyed. This ended the accumulation of the original Ogle acreage, for in late 1683 John Ogle died.

John Ogle died insolvent in the winter of 1683/4. A clue to the death is found in the will of Ralph Hutchinson, which. Although written and signed on February 16, 1679, it was not proved until December 31, 1683, and mentions land to go to ?John Ogle?s sons?, suggesting he may have died soon before (Calendar of Delaware Wills, p. 7).

As early as December 16, 1684, Elizabeth Ogle was complaining to the Court that her husband had already paid more than the appropriate amount of taxes on their holdings:

"Att a Court held at Newcastle for our Lord ye King & ye Hon?ble Proprietary December ye 16th 1684?Elisabeth Ogle brings in an account in Court that She hath paid many pounds more to her husbands account than the whole Estate of her said late husband did amount to by ye Appraysment (Records of New Castle, II, 93)."

Adding to his widow's troubles was a 1684 raid by Colonel James Talbot from Maryland which resulted in the destruction of her hay and the building of a Maryland "fort" on her property. Elizabeth Ogle and Anders Stille then sold their property and moved to White Clay Creek. She lived at the "Hopyard," which had been surveyed for her husband the year before.

The next listings of the taxables in Delaware, recorded in early 1685, early 1686, and 1687 listed Elizabeth Ogle as owning 1,000 acres on the north side of Christiana Creek (Records of New Castle, II, p. 102. 122. 170). However, apparently the question of whether the taxes were paid on the estate continued to plague Mrs. Ogle most of her life. She appeared in court a second time, in March of 1689, wherein it was recorded:

"Came into Court Elisabeth Ogle widdow and Administratrix of John Ogle deceased and made appear by Inventory and other papers and accounts in Court produced, that she hath over and above paid the Value of the Inventory of goods belonging to the said Ogle deceased, and committed to her Administration whereupon the Court grant her a Quieta est and discharge her from paying any more debts of the said John Ogle."

Unable to pay all of the estate's debts, Elizabeth Ogle was discharged from all further debts of her husband on 17 June 1690 by the New Castle Court. Meanwhile, her brother Peter Petersson Yocum in 1687 had purchased the "Hopyard" to protect it from creditors.

In 1696, Elizabeth's son John began to sell off the lands around present day Christiana. A tract of 75 acres was sold by John Ogle to John Latham on March 16th, 1696, for "land at Christina Bridge" (Records of New Castle, II, 224); and on the same day sold the upper half of a tract of land at White Clay Creek, three hundred acres (Records of New Castle, II, 225). These land sales suggest that Elisabeth Ogle may have already been deceased by that date.

Elizabeth died before 12 Sept. 1702 when John Hans (mvw note - this could be Stalcop) Steelman and Judith Yocum, as executors of the Yocum estate, sold the property. The family relocated to the area which was to become known as Ogletown, but maintained a wharf in Christiana as late as 1806, when the Orphans Court in the estate of Joseph Ogle recorded a Wharf and two old Store houses in Christiana Bridge. (New Castle County Orphans Court, Record I-I-451). However, the passing of Elizabeth Ogle and the division of her lands by her sons finally set the stage for the town of Christiana to be able to be developed.
(Here's a note from a gen forum:do not have the information with me, but there is a story that John (?) was originally and Adrienson (or something similar), but while coming to this county by ship was given the nickname "Steelcape" because of his attire. He decided to keep it as his surname.)

Sources

Smoky Mountain Clans, Donald B. Reagan, 1978, p 128b. 'The English Origin of John Ogle',

Francis Hamilton Hibbard, 1967, p 9-14, 16.

Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Langston & Buck, 1986, p 199.

'Ogle & Bothal', Sir Henry Ogle, 1902, Pedigree XIB.

Calendar of Delaware Wills, New Castle County, 1682-1800. Historical Dames of Delaware, Frederick H. Hitchcock, New York.

Records of the Court of New Castle, Vol. II, 1681-1699. Published by the Colonial Society of Pennsylvania, Meadville, PA, 1935

http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f000/f37/a0003794.htm

http://www.oghgul.org/Ahnentafel/Chart-uk/geneuk.htm

http://www.colonialswedes.org/Forefathers/Yocum.html John Ogle's House, formerly at Ogletown, Delaware. 
Biography  Ancestor of the Month
October 2006
John (of Delaware) Ogle
b. 30 Sep 1649 d. 1683/84
If we were going to make a movie of our ancestor John Ogle’s life, we would probably choose an actor like Erroll Flynn to play the lead. (I tried to think of a more modern actor—at least one who is alive and known to our younger family members, but I just couldn’t top Erroll Flynn, the swashbuckling, handsome, daring, adventurous heartthrob of yesteryear’s silver screen. Maybe Antonio Banderas would come close, but the accent needs to be British.)

The Ogles of Northumberland
John Ogle was born 30 Sep 1649 in Berwick-Upon-Tweed, England. He was the son of John (of Eglingham) Ogle and Elizabeth Pringle. John of Eglingham came from a long line of Ogles who traced their lineage back to Edward I, William the Conqueror, and Charlemagne.
Though the Ogle family had been on the losing side during the battle of Hastings when William the Conqueror had taken over the throne of England, they had somehow maintained their holdings, perhaps by pledging loyalty to the new king. Very few families in Northumberland, the Ogles’ homeland since early times, had managed to keep their properties after the Normans took over the throne. Humphrey de Ogle, however, was given a special document from King William which returned all the Ogle lands and holdings as they had been before the war. This included Ogle castle and the town of Ogle, both of which are still in existence in Northumberland.

The Civil War, the Commonwealth, and the Restoration
In that respect, the Ogles were lucky. Their luck was not always good, however. Dissatisfaction with the monarchy led to a period of Civil War that broke out in 1642. On 30 Jan 1649 the war ended with the beheading of King Charles I. Eight months later, on September 30, our John Ogle was born.
Since the Civil War had been basically “court versus country” (aristocracy versus landed gentry) at first John’s family fared well. John, Sr. received a commission in the army in 1650, one year after his son was born. He became captain of the militia for the four northern counties in England, and the next year under the Commonwealth he was a commissioner and also commanded a mounted troop in Scotland.
In1661 King Charles II and the monarchy were restored to power. Our John was only twelve years old, and his future did not look promising. Whereas the Commonwealth had been good for the Ogles, the period of Restoration would probably not have been, and even at John’s young age, he was probably smart enough to be looking for a way to improve his lot.
Charles’ Blunders
Though Charles II was well loved by his people, he did a number of things that were unwise, and his reign was fraught with problems The most compelling at this time were disagreements with the Dutch over lands in America which could easily lead to war. (Although unknown to John and not influencing his decisions, things would worsen. Later the winter and summer of 1665 would see the Black Plague ravage England again. Sixteen-sixty-six would bring the great fire that lasted five days and destroyed London.) Over some of his problems Charles II had no control; for others he must take complete blame.
For example, in 1664, the Dutch were infuriated when Charles cavalierly gave all the Dutch holdings in America to his brother James, the Duke of York, claiming that they were England’s by right of discovery. On 25 May, 1664, the Duke of York, later to become King James II, sent Colonel Robert Nicholls with an expedition of four ships, three hundred soldiers, and four hundred fifty men to America to secure these lands. At this time, our John was only fourteen years old; he wouldn’t be fifteen until September. Nevertheless, he quickly saw a way out of his family’s possibly bleak future, joined Nicholls’ group, and sailed to the Colonies.
Off to the America
When the expedition reached New Amsterdam, the Dutch, after minor negotiations, surrendered without firing a shot. Immediately the name New Amsterdam was changed to New York. John Ogle’s first encounter with war was an easy one.
Delaware, like New York, was of prime interest to European powers.
It had been an area of controversy among the Dutch, Swedes, and Finns for some time. Shortly before the English arrival, the Dutch had captured Delaware from the Swedes and added it to New Netherlands. The British saw an easy solution to all the squabbling. They simply moved into Delaware and took Fort Casimir, the major stronghold of the area. John served under Capt. Robert Carr during the takeover of Delaware and actually saw some fighting. He probably lived at Fort Casimir with the other British soldiers after the takeover. He remained in Delaware throughout his enlistment and continued to stay as a civilian.
Life in Delaware
After the British conquered Delaware, John settled first in New Castle and there lived the life of a conquering soldier. Shortly afterwards, he apparently caught the land ownership fever that was prevalent in the area. The early Swedish and Dutch colonists wanted enough land for “baronial estateJohn Ogle.” They dealt in land parcels so large it was hard to make improvements on them. Such desire for land. however, would make land speculation attractive.. Almost immediately—probably even before being discharged from the army--John began acquiring land and speculating in land and real estate. He did so for the rest of his life. Soon he had a home called “The Fishing Place” at Christiana Bridge, Christina River. His land lay next to that of Anders Stille, a Swedish friend
The Marriage, the Elizabeths, and the Controversy
Somewhere between 1664-1671 came the biggest mixup of John’s life, for it was at this time that he met and married his wife. The confusion is over who the wife was.
Version One says that John married Elizabeth Wollaston in 1665 He was sixteen; she was thirteen. Elizabeth Wollaston was the daughter (or sister) of Sgt. Thomas Wollaston, a comrade-in-arms of John Ogle. Another account of Version One says that Elizabeth Wollaston was the child of Thomas Wollaston, Sr., and that the couple married in England before John sailed.
Version Two says that at Anders Stille’s home sixteen-year-old John Ogle met thirteen-year-old Elizabeth Petersdotter, who had moved from her home to that of her uncle Anders in order to help take care of his household chores. Elizabeth was the daughter of Swedish colonists Peter Jochimson and Ella Olafsdotter. In this version John and this Elizabeth married in1671. Although no record has been found to show when John was discharged from the army, some of the other soldiers, including his friend Thomas Wollaston, were discharged in October 1669. Waiting to be discharged before marrying seems logical, but those in love aren’t always logical.
Version Three says that Elizabeth(s) Petersdotter and Wollaston were the same person: Elizabeth Petersdotter Wollaston. Now if she were the same person, all problems would be solved; however, it is unlikely that she can be melded into one. First of all we have the ethnic problem. Petersdotter is definitely Swedish; Wollaston is English. Secondly, there are at least two sets of parents involved. Thirdly, there are two different (probable) dates of death.
A possible solution would be that John was married twice (Version Four) Again, there is a problem. There is no known divorce record for Elizabeth Wollaston, and she apparently lived until 1713. John supposedly married Elizabeth Petersdotter in 1671. That would mean that John would have been a bigamist or that he had gotten an unheard of divorce. What was Elizabeth Wollaston doing in the colonies anyway? Did daughters accompany their soldier fathers and/or husbands or brothers to war?
Another possibility, Version Five, is that there are two John Ogles with wives named Elizabeth who moved to the same region at about the same time and that the facts of one man’s life have been incorporated into the life of the other.
Young John Ogle’s best friends were James Crawford and Thomas Wollaston, both of whom were older than he. His friendships with these men and with Anders Stille further muddy the waters. Several marriages occurred among descendents of the Ogle, Crawford, and Wollaston families. However, there are Stille spouses in the Ogle family, too. Thus, we need to verify just which of these theories about the Elizabeths is correct. Won’t that be fun? The more I look, the more possibilities there seem to be.
In any event, John (1) married somebody named Elizabeth and the couple went on to have two sons; Thomas Ogle (b c1672-d.1734) and John (2) Ogle (b. c1674-d 1720 Either Thomas or John had a son named John (3). It is from this grandson of John Ogle of Delaware that we descend. In 1997 the Ogle/Ogles Family Association determined that “until more positive evidence is available” to ascertain Elizabeth Ogle’s maiden name “she shall be known in Association records as ‘Elizabeth, maiden name unknown’ or Elizabeth??.’” As to our definite ancestor John (3)-- The Ogle/Ogles Family Association has taken the stand that “until more conclusive evidence is available,” John (3) will be noted as a son of either John (2) or Thomas. Perhaps we shall never know for sure.
Land Deals
John continued with his land acquisition. In 1666 he and three of his friends-- Sgt. Thomas Wollaston, John Hendricks, and Hermann Johnston--received part of a large grant from the Duke of York. Their land abutted a tract held by James Crawford, another comrade in arms of John Ogle. Ogle, Wollaston, Crawford, and their families settled on plantations near each other in New Castle County and were friends all their lives. John and Elizabeth also lived “next door” to Anders Stille.
Altercations and Disorder
Never one to be put upon, John Ogle’s outspokenness and temper sometimes got him into trouble. He was said by some to be ”rash and reckless.” One incident that shows Ogle’s spirit occurred on 4 June 1675. The magistrates of New Castle voted to build a road and dyke across the marsh near the town. An additional dyke across a marsh owned by a board member named Hans Block was also approved. Residents of the area were to contribute either labor or money to the projects. John Ogle led the group of objectors and informed the governing body that no dykes at all would be built. He claimed that the conditions were unfair since public labor and money would be used to improve Block’s private lands and raised such a ruckus that he was thrown out of the church where the meeting was being held. With Ogle gone, Mathys Smith and Rev. Jacobus Fabricius, a Lutheran minister, picked up the battle. The result was that Ogle and Fabricius were arrested for inciting a riot and held in a nearby anchored boat. From the boat Ogle and Fabricius continued to shout and curse. Eventually the two men were released, but when Ogle encountered Hans Block later on the street and insulted Block and “authority,” something had to be done.
The atmosphere in New Castle at that time was very much like that of a wild western border town or gold town. Fights, robberies, drunkenness, and general bad conduct were common. The town was unsafe in many respects, so Ogle probably thought nothing much would come of his shenanigans. The governor, however, saw things differently and issued warrants for Ogle and Fabricus who were considered the ringleaders of the fracas. The two along with several others had also signed a grievance which didn’t help matters. Ogle and Fabricus were ordered to appear before court in August, and the rest of the signers were to appear at a later court. When the August court met, Rev. Fabricus appeared, was found guilty, and defrocked. Ogle, who “conveniently fell sick,” did not appear and some reports say that “no further action was taken against him.” Later reports, however, show that both John Ogle and Anders Stille were fined twenty guilders for refusing to work on Hans Block’s dyke. John was also fined four hundred guilders for the charge of “inciting a riot.”
Public Works
Later In 1675 John was appointed overseer of the residents of Christina Creek when the Governor ordered the construction of new highways. Citizens of New Castle, the surrounding area, and the south side of Christina Creek were to be responsible for constructing a road twelve feet wide—fairly sizable in those days-- from New Castle to Red Lyon. Perhaps the governor showed good judgment in appointing John overseer (on the government’s side) rather than run the possibility of having him oppose the new road as he had opposed the dyke and road construction earlier in the year.
Age 25 and Beyond
John Ogle’s life after 1675 continued as before. He acquired more land and got into more disputes. One quarrel occurred when he accused a Dutch neighbor of stealing his heifer. The affair went to court, and since Thomas Wollaston was one of the jury members, should we be surprised that John won?
As a tobacco planter, John Ogle suffered the financial ups and downs of farming. He was almost continually in financial difficulties which he attempted to assuage with land dealings. Bartering was the high finance of the day, and little money changed hands
A seemingly insignifiant yet important event occurred 25 Aug 1680. At that time Thomas Wollaston asked his friend John Ogle to deliver a letter he had written to John Briggs of West Jersey. Briggs had owed Wollaston a debt for three years. John Ogle agreed, took the letter, and stopped by New York where he made an affidavit on 27 Aug concerning the transaction between Briggs and Wollaston. The affidavit begins: “John Ogle, aged thirty-two or thereabouts,” and—because of his age--permits us to link him with more certainty to the Ogle family in Northumberland. If there were two John Ogles, the notebearer is ours.
John’s Debts fall on Elizabeth
For the remainder of his life, John Ogle was involved in acquiring land and participating in lawsuits. When he died in the winter of 1683/84 at the age of thirty-four, he left many debts and no will. His wife Elizabeth had to take up the battle. On 16 December 1684 Elizabeth was in court to complain that her husband had already paid more than the appropriate amount of taxes on their holdings. She was harassed by claims of owing taxes for most of the rest of her life. Finally in March of 1698, the court agreed that she “hath over and above paid the inventory of goods belonging to the said [John] Ogle deceased” and discharged her from having to pay any more debts of her husband to the court.
There were, however, other debts and problems. In 1684 Colonel James Talbot from Maryland raided the area, destroyed Elizabeth’s hay by throwing it into the river, and built a fort on her property. Anders Stille and Elizabeth Ogle sold that property and moved to property called “the Hopyard “in White Clay Creek . “The Hopyard” had been surveyed for John Ogle the previous year. In 1687 Peter Petersson Yokum purchased the Hopyard to protect it from Elizabeth’s creditors. These two events present perhaps the best evidence in the “wife mystery,” as Anders Stille, Elizabeth Petersdotter’s uncle, appears to be helping take care of her, and Peter Petersson, Elizabeth Petersdotter’s brother, was also assisting. (Note: In The History of Gatlinburg, 1931, the author describes the Ogle family as “blond.” Could this be a Swedish trait inherited from Elizabeth Petersdotter? Hmmm.) (Note 2: The name Yokum comes from Peter Jochimson. Jochimson was anglicized to Yokum. Peter Jochimson (Yokum) was Elizabeth and Peter’s father.)
Elizabeth’s Death
In 1696 Elizabeth’s son John began selling off the other Ogle lands, possibly around the time of his mother’s death, which occurred sometime before 12 Sept 1702. On that date the executors of the Yocum estate sold the Hopyard property. (Elizabeth Wollaston reportedly lived until 1713)
After Elizabeth’s death and the selling of the Ogle properties, the Ogle families relocated to an area which came to be known as Ogletown. The lands originally owned by the Ogles are located in what is now Christiana, Delaware.
John Ogle’s life was brief but full of action. Never one to walk away from a fight, he showed the spirit, determination, and occasional brashness needed by the early settlers of our country who wanted to acquire land, establish homes, and prosper in the new world. Like many of our forefathers, John Ogle was a young man who came to America hoping to fulfill his dreams.of making his own way in life.
John (3) (of Delaware)Ogle is Eli McCarter’s great, great, great, great, great, great (6 greats) grandfather
Sources:
Celebrate Boston.com ( American History, Part II. A History of the Colony of New York Back to Dutch Rule)
Craig, Dr. Peter Stebbin. “Peter Jochim and his Yocum Descendents. Swedish Colonial News. Vol #15, Spring 1997
Craig, Dr. Peter Stebbin. “Elisabeth Petersdotter Yocum, Wife of the English Soldier, John Ogle. “ The Ogle Genealogist. Vol 18, 1997. pp. 19-27.
“Exchange of Views Regarding the Identity of Elizabeth, Wife of John Ogle, Immigrant to Delaware and Parent of John (3) Ogle. The Ogle Genealogist, Vol 18, 1997. pp. 27-51.
Greve, Jeanette. The History of Gatlinburg. Nashville: Premiere Press, 1931
Hibbard, Francis Hamilton, The English Origins of John Ogle, 1976, pp..9-14
“John Ogle of Christiana” (www.xtinahs.org/Digitaltour/JohnOgleGrave.html)
John (of Delaware) Ogle.” Smokykin.com
Reagan, Donald B. Smoky Mountain Clans, Vol I.
“Robert Nicholls” in “Pioneers of New Jersey”. Wikipedia
Scharf, Thomas J. History of Delaware 1609-88. Vol 2. Philadelphia: W. Richard and Co., 1886., Ch. XLII, p. 848.7 
Immigration*1664 He immigrated in 1664 to New Castle, DE. 
MILITARY*1664 He served in the military in 1664.2 
Description*1 October 1664 He was described as "The town was taken on October 1, 1664. Later in October Colonel Richard Nicolls, deputy governor for the Duke of York, of all the Duke's conquered territory in America, came to New Amstel to establish his authority over the Delaware colony, because Sir Roert Carr, when called to account for his plundering of the people, had sent to New York a defiant message claiming independence of Nicolls in the reduction of the river.
...it was on the occasion of this visit that Nicolls changed the name of New Amstel to New Castle. It may be that Col. Nicolls was impressed by the beauty of the site upon the majestic river ... and remembered Newcastle-on-Tyne at home, famous for a similar distinction of site. Taken from "New Castle on The Delaware" published by the New Castle Historical Society. on 1 October 1664 at New Castle, DE. 
Biography*2 April 1914  On 2 April 1914 at Frederick, MD, Notes from the Daily News, Frederick County, Maryland April 2, l914
"The older Ogle arrived in Delaware on military expedition about September, 1664. His grandson (Joseph Ogle) married in Old Swedes Church, Wilmington, Delaware December 4, 1729 and settled in Frederick County Maryland where he died in 1756. His will mentioned his two brothers, Thomas and Benjamin and children. Benjamin, his brother witnessed the will. Joseph Ogle and his wife Sarah Winters Ogle had 10 children."
He accumulated much property in New Castle, Delaware and his widow assessed for 1,000 acres. The following is a quote from Founding the American Colonies 1583-1660 written by John E. Pomfret: Stuvesant's last months were difficult and unhappy. The Hudson overflowed destoying crops, and there was an earthquake. The Indians threatened trouble, and Connecticut was again advancing extravagant claims. The New Amsterdam magistrates were busy drawing up their usual remonstrances addressed to the States General and the company. Only a Charter, the sort of thing an Englishman dotes on as an idol would satisfy them wrote the director. The Dutch West India Company informed Stuyvesant in the spring of 1664 that the English Expedition intended to bring New England under one government and it said that henceforth there would be less trouble from the north. On August 18, 1664, the English fleet of four frigates entered New Amsterdam waters. Meanwhile, the Connecticut General court had resolved that its charter embraced the whole of Long Island. The English fleet under Richard Nicolls reached the Narrows on August 28, 1664 and Nicholls published the king's patent. Nicolls was named deputy governor of the kings domains (by King James) and he remained in New York to carry out the king's assignments. King James and England now had control from Maine to the Carolinas. In spite of the fact that King James was not a colonizer, nevertheless, small settlements grew up along the Delaware River.

It is said that John Ogle came to America in 1664 on a military expedition to claim New York and Delaware for the King of England. Peter Stuyvesant surrendered August 29, l664. New Amsterdam became New York and New Amstel became New Castle, Delaware. John resided at New Castle and later acquired 1,000 acres there. THE ENGLISH ORIGIN OF JOHN OGLE In March of 1664, the whole of the territory in America occupied by the Dutch on the Atlantic seaboard was granted by Charles II to his brother, the Duke of York, on the plea that it was British soil by right of discovery. On May 25, 1664, Colonel Nicholls sailed from Portsmouth with four ships, 300 soldiers and 450 men. The expedition arrived at New Amsterdam, and without firing a shot, Governor Stuyvesant surrendered the town on August 29 and it became known as New York. Among the members of colonel Nicoll's military expedition of 1664 was young John Ogle. His mission was to defeat the Dutch and help establish English rule in New York and Delaware. Serving under the command of Captain Carr, John participated in the capture of New Castle Delaware and the surrounding territory. Delaware had been originally settled by the Swedes who quarrelled with the Dutch located at Fort Casimir located six miles from the Swedish outpost of Fort Christiana. The quarrel continued until in 1654 Governor Rising arrived from Sweden with a large number of colonist and overran Fort Casimir taking it from the Dutch and renaming if in honor of the day of capture, Fort of the Holy Trinity.

In time Governor Stuyvesant brought troops from New Amsterdam and recaptured the fort and confering upon it the name of New Amstel. In time the name would be changed to New Castle under the English. Why would the sixteen year old John Ogle be involved in a military expedition designed to sieze lands from the Dutch and what sort of life did he leave behind in order to enjoy this adventure? He was essentially a victim of revolutionary times. He was the son of Captain John Ogle and Eleanor Pringle of Eglingham, Northumberland. Both his father and his grandfather, Captain Henry Ogle distinguished themselves in Cromwell's army and young John Ogle no doubt became aware at an early age of the difficulties which his family was likely to experience after the Restoration and certainly he had heard tales of adventures in the New World. One plus one equaled two and John Ogle jumped at the opportunity to join Colonel Nicoll's expedition bound for America. No doubt leaving the County of Northumberland in the north of England was a difficult decision for it was anciently the home of the Ogles where they lived for many generations before the Norman conquest and where even in the seventeenth century various branches of the family continued to hold considerable estates.

The Northumberland Ogles have been thoroughly investigated and well-chronicled by Sir Henry Asgill Ogle in his exhaustive and authoritative work, which was published in Newcastle upon Tyne in 1902. Unfortunately, Sir Henry's otherwise excellent book failed to mention a young Ogle who left his home in 1664 and eventually settled in Delaware. How then is it possible to connect the John Ogle of Delaware with this ancient family of Northumberland? The connection was made by Francis H. Hibbard and is documented in the work, The English Origin of John Ogle, First of the Name in Delaware, 1664 much of which is quoted here. The book states on page six, "If John Ogle's connection with his Northumberland ancestors was to be discovered and proved, research obviously would have to be done in the original records in England where I would hope to uncover one essential fact which had eluded not only Sir Henry Ogle but every other Ogle genealogis to the presnet time -- namely, contemporary evidence of the birth of John Ogle about 1649. My search for the English origin of John Ogle was carried out mainly on the spot in Northumberland with a number of excursions into other localities having records of seventeenth century Ogles and of course, in the fine specialist libraries in London and Newcastle." The connection was made on February 21, 1963 in the following manner: " On Saturday afternoon February 16, 1963 I attended a lecture on "The Manuscript Collections in the Newcastle Central Library" given at the rooms of the Society of Genealogists in London by Mr. A. Wallace, F.L.S, of the Central Library, Newcastle; and I then determined to go immediately to Newcastle for research. Five days later, I was at work in the Central Library when Mr. Wallace came over to my table carrying a volume of parish records which he opened in front of me, and pointing to an entry for 1649, asked me it that might be the information I was searching for. It was; and thus the discovery was made.

The volume which we examined was a volume of parish registers of Berwick-upon-Tweed Volume A, 1574-1700, Holy Trinity Parish in which we read: CHRISTENINGS: 30 Sep. 1649 John, son of John Ogell, captain. After my excitement at the long hoped for discovery had abated, my checking for evidence that might disprove the identification of the son of Captain John Ogle with John Ogle of Delaware began; but to this day I have found no further evidence. John Ogle was not mentioned in any of the legal records concerning his father or his grandfather, Henry Ogle of Eglingham, nor was any further information uncovered in the parish registers. The inescapable conclusion is that young John Ogle left his home in Northumberland at the age of 15 to join Colonel Nicoll's expedition." He would marry and settle in Delaware founding the American branch of the Ogle family. His widow would be recorded as living near New Castle, Delaware in 1684. The whole of this highly speculative find would be better confirmed by an unimportant incident for On August 25, 1680 a Thomas Wollaston of White clay Creek wrote a letter to John Briggs of West Jersey which he gave to John Ogel for delivery. It seems that Wollaston had a debt of three years standing against Briggs. Ogle made the journey, stopping in New York where on August 27, 1680 he made an affidavit concerning the transaction. The affidavit began: "John Ogle, aged thirty-two or thereabouts..." (Pennsylvania Archives, First Series, Vol. I, p.89) The incident itself is not important, but Ogle's statement of his approximate age has been of crucial importance to Ogle genealogy as without it connecting him with absolute centainly to his Northumberland family would have been impossible.

The place where John Ogle would settle to begin his new life was originally called Nieuw Port May by the Dutch, but before long the name was changed to Delaware. A phamplet put out by the state gives a nice summary of the early history of the territory. It says," Delaware's history is a long and proud one. The earliest explorations of the coastline were made by Spanish and Portugese sailors in the sixteenth century. The state derived its name from Lord De La Warr, an early governor of Virginia. In 1610 Captain Samuel Argall, sailing for Lord De La Warr, was blown off course and sailed into a strange bay which he named in honor of his governor. The Dutch made the first European settlement on Delaware soil. A party of approximately thirty individuals landed near the present town of Lewes in 1631. Their settlement named Zwaanendael (Valley of the Swans) was destroyed by Indians in less than a year. In 1638 Swedish colonist led by Peter Minuit landed at a spot that is now part of downtown Wilmington. This first permanent settlement was called Fort Christina after the young queen of Sweden, and the river likewise named for her. Their colony soon extended along the Delaware River from the mouth of the Bay up to modern Trenton. In 1651 the Dutch returned to Delaware Bay building Fort Casimir and about twenty houses where New Castle now stands. In 1654 the Swedes seized control of this Fort but the next year Dutch soldiers and warships from New Amsterday, led by Peter Stuyvesant, conquered all of New Sweden. By 1657 the village outside Fort Casimir, renamed New Amstel, had grown to nearly a hundred houses. [Then in 1664 came John Ogle and Col. Nicholl's expedition] When the English under the Duke of York in 1664 captured all the Dutch territory in America, they called the town New Castle. The Swedes ruled here for thirteen years, the Dutch for nine. The English stayed in power for 112 years. The Duke of York kept possession until 1682. Then he transferred the colony to William Penn who joined it to Pennsylvania as The Three Lower Counties. After twenty-two years these Lower Counties became partly independent, with their own Assembly which met at the old town of New Castle. In 1776 Delaware became completely seperate from Pennsylvania as well as independent of Great Britain. Delaware played a substantial role in the Revolution. It raised nearly 4000 men. Its long-term continental regiment fought in almost every important battle from Long Island in 1776 to Yorktown in 1781. The only Revolutionary engagement fought on Delaware soil was a skirmish at Cooch's Bridge near Newark on September 3, l777. Tradition has it that it was here that the American flag was unfurled in land battle on United States soil. In 1787 Delaware was the first of the thirteen original states to ratify the United States Constitution, thus earning the nickname, The First State."

A good biographical sketch of John Ogle appears on page 10 of The English Origin of John Ogle by Francis Hibbard in which he states: "John Ogle , had served under Captain Carr in Delaware, became a permanent resident of White Clay Creek Hundred, named from the deposits of white clay found along its banks. John Ogle first resided at New Castle where he was a large land-buyer; he afterwards lived at various sites on his extensive holdings. He commenced acquiring land at an early date, probably as soon as the confusion of the conquest and the settlement of Indian troubles permitted it. The first grant that John Ogle received was in February 1666 from Governor Nicolls who had empowered the officers of Delaware to dispose of "implanted" land there for the best advantage of the inhabitants. The parcel known as Muscle Cripple was granted to Sgt. Thomas Wollaston, John Ogle, John Hendricks and Herman Johnson. It consisted of a part of 300 acres and was bounded by a creek at the head of Bread and Cheese Island and also by the plantations of Hans Bones and James Crawford. Sargent Wollaston had been a comrade in arms as had Hames Crawford, having gained some knowledge of medicine in the army, was known as "Doctor" on the early assessment rolls. His daughter, Mary, was later to marry into the Ogle family. Crawford was on of the heroes of the Nicoll's expedition with his land grant specifically stating that it was given "in consideration of the good service performed by James Crawford, a soldier". The story of John Ogle is closely bound up with that of his friends Thomas Wollaston and James Crawford who took a liking to young Ogle and formed a friendship which continued throughout their lives. The three friends settled on nearby plantations in New Castle county, where their wives survived them. The Records of the Court of Newcastle give a picture of their lives after 1676. The three are the foundation of the Ogle genealogy. John Ogle's son, Thomas, married Mary Crawford, daughter of James. Wollaston connections appear in the fourth and fifth generations. Joseph Ogle married Priscilla Wollaston and their son, Samuel, married Deborah Wollaston.

An eye-witness account of the events of June 1675 has come down to us revealing something of the character of John Ogle of that period - swashbuckling, rash and reckless with an amount of courage appropriate to the rough and tumble frontier enviorment. He was not one to be imposed on, especially by one of the Dutch who certainly did not amount to much in the eyes of His Majesty's soldiers. Under order of the Governor-General the magistrates met at New Castle on June 4, 1675 and decided that it would be necessary to build a road across the marsh and to build a dyke in the marsh next to the town. Another dyke across Hans Block's marsh was also thought necessary, and the inhabitants were ordered to assist in the project by contributing labour or money. The project was strenuously opposed by the settlers because the dyke across Hans Block's marsh was an improvement to private property. John Ogle was a leader of the objectors and preemptorily informed the magistrates that no dykes at all would be built under such unfair conditions. His objection stirred the people to great excitement in the church where the public meeting was held; and Ogle was put out of the church. Mathys Smith and the Rev. Jacobus Fabricius took up the cause and as a result Ogle and Fabricius were arrested. They were confined in a boat which was anchored nearby, where they continued their public imprecations. Excitement was high and they were eventually released. Later Hans Block encountered Ogle on the street and was told that if the Finns had been drunk no good would have come from the incident. It was an affront to constituted authority and called for severe disciplinary measures. Conditions in New Castle were not good at that time; carousals, fights and robberies were the order of the day, and it wasn't a safe place for a stranger. William Edmundson, "a public friend" visiting there, found it difficult to secure lodgings, "the inhabitants being chiefly Dutch and Finns addicted to drunkenness," who refused to take him in even though he had money. Special warrants were issued by the Governor against Fabricius and Ogle who with others had signed resistance. The two chief trouble makers were ordered to appear in the August Court, and the other signers before a later court. Fabricius appearned and the proceedings resulted in the unfrocking of the troublesome parson; Ogle, who conveniently fell sick, failed to appear, and no further action was taken against him. After the excitement of the summer of 1675, Ogle proceeded to acquire more land, and the tract known as Hampton, on the south side of St. George's Creek, consisting of 300 acres, was confirmed to him by Governor Andross on November 5, 1675. New Castle court records reveal that in February 1676 Ogle accused one of the Dutch residents of stealing his heiffer. As one of the jurymen was Thomas Wallaston, the outcome was predictable. The above incident marked the beginning of a series of court proceedings which involved John Ogle and James Crawford for the rest of their lives.

Ogle was an extensive producer of tobacco, and like other planters he was continually involved in financial and other difficulties. Little ready money changed hands in those days as the barter syster was the common way of doing business. Various deeds of the period after 1678 record transfers of extensive tracts of land to a number of Ogle's associates; among them, Swart Neuton's Island was transferred to John Darby of Maryland, and other lands to John Test and to Augustine Dixon. In 1675 the Governor ordered the construction of highways and the inhabitants of New Castle and the surrounding area, and on the south side of Christiana Creek were made responsible for construction a highway from New Castle to Red Lyon between the first of January and the end of February. The highway was to be a good passable one, twelve feet wide and John Ogle was appointed overseer of the residents around Christiana Creek." We know the names of John Ogle's sons because in November 1681 Ogle received a court order to take up 200 acres of land for each of his two sons, Thomas and John Ogle, and on December 27 to take up 435 acres called "The Fishing Place" on Christiana Creek were surveyed. On August 16, of the following he took up a tract, Northampton, of 200 acres. 

Family

Elizabeth (?) b. 1654, d. 1713
MARRIAGE*1665 He married Elizabeth (?), daughter of Peter Jochimsson and Ella Stilley, in 1665 at DE.5 
Children
Last Edited14 Jun 2016

Citations

  1. "In 1664 affairs in England's American colonies were not running smoothly. Disputes among various settlements were prevalent. In addition to these troubles, the aggressive foreign policy of the Dutch government was a mater of serious concern in America as well as other parts of the world. Charles II and his brother, the Duke of York, having decided upon summary action, appointed a commission to go over and adjust the difficulties. Armed forces were to accompany them for the enforcement of their decisions and for certain conquests which had no doubt been anticipated. Colonel Richard Nicolls, in charge, with Sir Rober Carr, Sir George Cartwright and Samuel Maverick as the members, set out upon a mission that was destined to become an important and far-reaching event in American history. While its ostensible purpose was to straighten out the difficulties among the English settlements, its primary object was the removal of the Dutch menace to English trade and political power in America.

    Easy victories for the English forces resulted in the fall of New Amsterdam and New Amstel, and their re-establishment as New York and New Castle, as well as the complete surrender of the contiguous territory. The Dutch were almost eliminated, leaving only France and Spain as serious contenders for supremacy in America.

    John Ogle, "one of the soldiers at New Castle," was fearless, independent, stubborn, contentious, and possessed a considerable amount of the arrogance that the Elizabethan tradition had transmitted to the individual British soldier. He was typical of the men going out from Britain who were participating in the beginnings of a world empire which was finally to eclipse all of its predecessors.
  2. [S4] John Ogle, Booklet Library of Congress.
  3. [S473] "Ogle."
  4. [S378] Unknown subject unknown repository.
  5. [S62] Owen Kardatzke, "Wollaston", Elsie Wollaston Administrative Support Librarian in Vancouver Canada sent me this information. She saw my web site with the Ogle information. e-mail address.
  6. [S605] Unknown subject unknown record type, by unknown photographer.
  7. [S607] Unknown compiler.

John Ogle

M, #2469
Father*John (Jehu) Ogle b. 5 Aug 1731
Mother*Ruth Beall b. 1741
 John Ogle was the son of John (Jehu) Ogle and Ruth Beall
Last Edited17 Aug 1994

John Ogle

M, #2491
Father*Captain James Ogle b. 1 Jun 1753, d. 1830
Mother*Mary Biggs
 John Ogle was the son of Captain James Ogle and Mary Biggs
Last Edited17 Aug 1994

John Ogle

M, #2499
Father*Thomas Ogle b. 23 Jan 1749
Mother*Sibylla Schley
 John Ogle was the son of Thomas Ogle and Sibylla Schley
MARRIAGE* He married Susan Thomas, daughter of Michael Thomas Sr. 

Family

Susan Thomas
Last Edited17 Aug 1994

John (Jehu) Ogle

M, #2463, b. 5 August 1731
Father*Joseph Ogle b. 1705
Mother*Sarah Winters d. c 1780
MARRIAGE* John (Jehu) Ogle married Ruth Beall, daughter of William Beall and Anna Magruder
Birth*5 August 1731 He was born on 5 August 1731 at Frederick, MD.1 
 He was the son of Joseph Ogle and Sarah Winters
Biography*1999  According to Jean Godwin of the Ogle society he went to Allegheny Co., MD and his children went on to Pennsylvania and Ohio. 

Family

Ruth Beall b. 1741
Children
Last Edited2 Dec 1999

Citations

  1. [S373] Brumbaugh, Earliest Records All Saints.

John Harry Ogle1,2

M, #3879, b. 1862
Father*Benjamin Roumanis.. Ogle1 b. 23 Feb 1824, d. a 1890
Mother*Anna Virginia Nelson1
Birth*1862 John Harry Ogle was born in 1862.1 
 He was the son of Benjamin Roumanis.. Ogle and Anna Virginia Nelson.1 
CENSUS1880*1880 He appeared on the Census in 1880.3 
City Direc*1889 He was New Tag in 1889 at Washingon, D.C.4 
Last Edited16 Dec 2004

Citations

  1. [S55] 1870 Census;.
  2. [S544] Jim Patrick, "Ogle Discussion," e-mail to Margot Woodrough, February 2004.
  3. [S56] 1880 Census;, He is living with father and sister. No mother listed.
  4. [S562] Boyd, Boyd's Washington.

John Ogle Jr

M, #2439, b. circa 1674, d. 1720
Father*John Ogle b. Sep 1649, d. b 19 Feb 1683
Mother*Elizabeth (?) b. 1654, d. 1713
Birth*circa 1674 John Ogle Jr was born circa 1674 at New Castle, DE.1 
 He was the son of John Ogle and Elizabeth (?) 
Death*1720 He died in 1720 at Ogletown, DE. 
Last Edited12 Nov 2007

Citations

  1. [S62] Owen Kardatzke, "Wollaston", Elsie Wollaston Administrative Support Librarian in Vancouver Canada sent me this information. She saw my web site with the Ogle information. e-mail address.