Rubye Floyd

F, #1439, b. 22 July 1907
Father*Archibald R. Floyd b. 3 Jan 1868, d. 30 Oct 1927
Mother*Margaret Juliette Holland b. 27 Jul 1882, d. 30 Oct 1937
ChartsZachariah Davis
WILLIAM BASSE
ZACHARIAS DAVIS
Birth*22 July 1907 Rubye Floyd was born on 22 July 1907.1 
 She was the daughter of Archibald R. Floyd and Margaret Juliette Holland
MARRIAGE*2 October 1927 She married James F. Barlow on 2 October 1927. 
Married Name2 October 1927  As of 2 October 1927,her married name was Barlow. 

Family

James F. Barlow b. 27 August 1897, d. 15 January 1974
Last Edited24 Mar 2000

Citations

  1. [S470] Doris Dixon, "La Verne papers."

Rufus Floyd1

M, #3659, b. October 1893
Father*Federick Floyd1 b. Aug 1856
Mother*Leeanna (?)1 b. Aug 1872, d. b 1920
ChartsWILLIAM BASSE
Birth*October 1893 Rufus Floyd was born in October 1893 at GA.1 
 He was the son of Federick Floyd and Leeanna (?)1 
Last Edited24 Jun 2003

Citations

  1. [S59] 1900 Census;.

Ruth Floyd

F, #1482, b. 1915
Father*James Washington (Cousin Jim) Floyd b. 12 Mar 1882, d. 1 Dec 1967
Mother*Ava A. Sanders b. 14 Apr 1884, d. 19 Oct 1967
ChartsZachariah Davis
WILLIAM BASSE
ZACHARIAS DAVIS
Birth*1915 Ruth Floyd was born in 1915 at GA.1 
 She was the daughter of James Washington (Cousin Jim) Floyd and Ava A. Sanders
MARRIAGE*1 September 1931 She married Homer J. McCorvey on 1 September 1931 at Moultrie, GA, Lived in or near Moultrie, Georgia. 
CENSUS1920*1920 She appeared on the census in 1920 at Bleckley County, GA.1 
Married Name1 September 1931  As of 1 September 1931,her married name was McCorvey. 

Family

Homer J. McCorvey
Last Edited25 Apr 2006

Citations

  1. [S61] 1920 Census;.

Ruth Lillian Floyd

F, #1525, b. 9 January 1909, d. 22 August 1969
Father*James Edward Floyd b. 25 Mar 1875, d. 19 Sep 1960
Mother*Annie Jane Holland b. 17 Jul 1884, d. 19 Apr 1967
ChartsZachariah Davis
WILLIAM BASSE
ZACHARIAS DAVIS
Birth*9 January 1909 Ruth Lillian Floyd was born on 9 January 1909 at Pulaski County, GA. 
 She was the daughter of James Edward Floyd and Annie Jane Holland
MARRIAGE*17 January 1926 She married Frank C. Richardson, son of (?) Richardson and Letitia (?), on 17 January 1926.1 
Death*22 August 1969 She died on 22 August 1969 at age 60.1 
Married Name17 January 1926  As of 17 January 1926,her married name was Richardson. 
Biography*1999  Ruth Floyd was a giving person. She was generous and kind It is likely that she never traveled far from her life in Pulaski County. Her time was spent as the cook in the elementary school where no doubt her friendly outlook on life ideally suited her for the job. 

Family

Frank C. Richardson b. 21 June 1906, d. 17 January 1974
Children
Last Edited25 Jul 2006

Citations

  1. [S470] Doris Dixon, "La Verne papers."

Salisha Floyd

F, #1110
Father*Francis Floyd b. c 1693, d. 30 Dec 1760
Mother*Elizabeth Bell b. c 1720, d. a 1761
Birth* Salisha Floyd was born at Edgecomb, NC. 
 She was the daughter of Francis Floyd and Elizabeth Bell
Last Edited1 Aug 2008

Sally Floyd1

F, #2875, b. 5 August 1906, d. 27 March 1907
Father*William Amos (Bill) Floyd1 b. 24 Mar 1866, d. 22 Jul 1948
Mother*Fannie Hart1 b. 11 Aug 1875, d. 16 Nov 1950
ChartsZachariah Davis
WILLIAM BASSE
ZACHARIAS DAVIS
Burial*1906  Called little Salley on her tombstone. 
Birth*5 August 1906 Sally Floyd was born on 5 August 1906.1 
 She was the daughter of William Amos (Bill) Floyd and Fannie Hart.1 
Death*27 March 1907 She died on 27 March 1907.1 
Last Edited1 Jul 2002

Citations

  1. [S23] Doris Floyd Dixon, "Pedigree Chart."

Sally Floyd1

F, #3939, b. 11 October 1812, d. 11 January 1892
Father*Thomas Penuel Floyd Sr.1 b. c 1764, d. May 1815
Mother*Mary Sarah Beckwith1
Birth*11 October 1812 Sally Floyd was born on 11 October 1812.1 
 She was the daughter of Thomas Penuel Floyd Sr. and Mary Sarah Beckwith.1 
Death*11 January 1892 She died on 11 January 1892 at age 79 She never married.1 
Last Edited8 Nov 2007

Citations

  1. [S486] Donald Floyd, "Donald Floyd."

Sarah Jane (Sallie) Floyd

F, #1251, b. 29 July 1878, d. 29 March 1962
Father*George Washington Floyd b. Jan 1854, d. 30 Aug 1923
Mother*Susanah (Susan) Davis b. 15 Oct 1857, d. 26 Nov 1941
ChartsZachariah Davis
WILLIAM BASSE
ZACHARIAS DAVIS
Birth*29 July 1878 Sarah Jane (Sallie) Floyd was born on 29 July 1878 at Pulaski County, GA. 
 She was the daughter of George Washington Floyd and Susanah (Susan) Davis
MARRIAGE*20 December 1893 She married John Henry Simmons on 20 December 1893.1 
MARRIAGE*28 May 1938 She married George Pinkney Woods Jr. on 28 May 1938.1 
Death*29 March 1962 She died on 29 March 1962 at age 83.1 
Note*  According to Ed Harmon's notes from his grandmother: "She rodea buggy pulled by a small horse by the Charlie Davis place. She was a small petite (spritely) woman always dressed up with a hat on.2 
CENSUS1880*1880 She appeared on the Census in 1880 at GA.3 
Married Name20 December 1893  As of 20 December 1893,her married name was Simmons.1 
Married Name28 May 1938  As of 28 May 1938,her married name was Woods.1 

Family 1

John Henry Simmons
MARRIAGE*20 December 1893 She married John Henry Simmons on 20 December 1893.1 
Child

Family 2

George Pinkney Woods Jr. d. 1939
MARRIAGE*28 May 1938 She married George Pinkney Woods Jr. on 28 May 1938.1 
Last Edited12 Mar 2006

Citations

  1. [S512] Bob Bridger, "Bridger," e-mail to Margot Woodrough, March 2003.
  2. [S579] Ed Harmond, "Harmond," e-mail to MVW, Feb 8 2006.
  3. [S56] 1880 Census;.

Seaborn Andrew Floyd1

M, #1633, b. 11 March 1866, d. 10 September 1929
SEABORN ANDREW FLOYD
Father*Washington J. Floyd b. 10 Feb 1814, d. 15 Sep 1885
Mother*Susan Lister b. 1833, d. 8 Jun 1909
ChartsWILLIAM BASSE
MARRIAGE* Seaborn Andrew Floyd married Mary Lou Sandiford
Birth*11 March 1866 He was born on 11 March 1866 at Pulaski County, Ga. 
 He was the son of Washington J. Floyd and Susan Lister
Burial*September 1929  In September 1929 He is buried at Fishing Creek Baptist Church Cenetery. It is a rural cemetery near Lumber City.2 
Death*10 September 1929 He died on 10 September 1929 at Wheeler, GA, at age 63. 
CENSUS18701870 He appeared on the census in 1870 at Pulaski County, GA.3 
Name Variation1880  As of 1880, Seaborn Andrew Floyd was also known as Andrew S. Floyd He later changed his name to Seaborn A. Floyd according to Don Floyd. 
CENSUS1880*1880 He appeared on the Census in 1880.4 
CENSUS1900*1900 He appeared on the census in 1900 at Dodge County, GA.5 

Family

Mary Lou Sandiford b. October 1876
MARRIAGE* He married Mary Lou Sandiford
Children
Last Edited6 Aug 2017

Citations

  1. [S542] Betty Curran, "Western Floyds," e-mail to MVW, Feb 2004.
  2. [S491] Jerry Floyd, "Jerry Floyd," e-mail to MVW, June 2001.
  3. [S55] 1870 Census;, House # 566.
  4. [S56] 1880 Census;, shown on this census as Andrew S.
  5. [S59] 1900 Census;.
  6. [S490] Donald R. Floyd, The Elusive Floyds.

Shadrach Calvin Floyd1

M, #3931, b. 2 June 1898, d. 31 March 1925
Father*George Washington Floyd1 b. 4 Jul 1840, d. 14 Feb 1912
Mother*Amanda Louise McLemore1 b. Apr 1871, d. 5 Dec 1947
ChartsWILLIAM BASSE
Birth*2 June 1898 Shadrach Calvin Floyd was born on 2 June 1898 at Dooly, GA.1 
 He was the son of George Washington Floyd and Amanda Louise McLemore.1 
Death*31 March 1925 He died on 31 March 1925 at GA at age 26.1 
Last Edited2 Mar 2004

Citations

  1. [S550] Rikke Love, "Rikki Love," e-mail to Margot Woodrough, Feb 2004.

Shadrack Floyd

M, #1115, d. 1831
Father*Thomas Floyd b. s 1730, d. b 27 Jul 1780
Mother*Ann (?) (?)1 b. c 1740, d. 1795
 Shadrack Floyd was the son of Thomas Floyd and Ann (?) (?)1 
MARRIAGE*say 1800 He married Mildred (?) say 1800 at NC. 
Death*1831 He died in 1831 at Nash, N.C, Nash County records show Estate by Jury of Mrs. S. Floyd p. 27 of land transfer records. 
COURT*15 November 1771  On 15 November 1771 at Bute, NC, "Ordered that a road be cleared from Cyprus to the New road at Edgecomb Line between "Little Turkey Creek" and Peach Tree. Among those listed for the work were Thomas Floyd (possibly the father) and Shadrick Floyd (possibly the son). Bute was formed in 1764, acquired part of Northampton in 1776 and abolished in 1777 to become Franklin and Warren County. 
DEED10 October 1783 He was shown on a deed on 10 October 1783 at Franklin, NC, A Land grant for Shadrack Floyd was for 150 acres in Franklin lying on waters of Cypress Creek.
(Bute County formed in 1764. Part of Northampton annexed to Bute in 1776. Bute abolished in 1777 and changed to Franklin and Warren.)2 
DEED*16 July 1787  On 16 July 1787 at Northampton, NC, Shadrack Floyd witnessed sale of land.2 
CENSUS1790*1790 He appeared on the census in 1790 at Halifax District, Franklin, NC; He is head of household of ten people.3

Family

Mildred (?)
MARRIAGE*say 1800 He married Mildred (?) say 1800 at NC. 
Last Edited31 Aug 2006

Citations

  1. [S486] Donald Floyd, "Donald Floyd."
  2. [S475] Watson, Northampton Abstracts.
  3. [S47] 1790 Census;, There were two males over 16, two under 16, three females and no slaves.

Shadrick Floyd

M, #1124, b. 5 November 1805, d. before 1860
Father*Federick (Fed) Floyd b. c 1779, d. 1825
Mother*Mourning Bass b. c 1790, d. b 1860
ChartsWILLIAM BASSE
Birth*5 November 1805 Shadrick Floyd was born on 5 November 1805 at N.C. 
 He was the son of Federick (Fed) Floyd and Mourning Bass
MARRIAGE*28 November 1829 He married Esther Yearty on 28 November 1829 at Pulaski County, GA.1 
Death*before 1860 He died before 1860 at Dooly, GA., He must be dead as wife and two younger children are living with a F.F Floyd age 23 (probably his son. The"F" middle initial might be a clue for future research) .2 
MILITARY*31 August 1826 He served in the military on 31 August 1826 at GA He appears as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 387th Dist of Pulaski GM served until July 1, 1831. 
JURY*1829 He was served on jury in 1829 at Petit Jury, Pulaski County, GA.. 
CENSUS1830*1830 He appeared on the census in 1830 at GA; He appears with his wife alone.3 
CENSUS1850*1850 He appeared on the CENSUS in 1850 at Houston County, GA.4 

Family

Esther Yearty b. 1812
MARRIAGE*28 November 1829 He married Esther Yearty on 28 November 1829 at GA.1 
Children
Last Edited24 Jul 2006

Citations

  1. [S377] Pulaski County Marriages.
  2. [S54] 1860 Census;.
  3. [S50] 1830 Census;, p. 138.
  4. [S52] 1850 Census;, HH 759 Upper 5th Dist.

Shadrick D. Floyd1

M, #1166, b. 22 June 1845, d. 1916
SHADRICK FLOYD
SHADE FLOYD MEMORIAL
SHADE FLOYD
FREDERICK FLOYD
Father*Amos Kinchen Floyd b. 11 Apr 1816, d. a 29 Sep 1900
Mother*Anna Luttia Mc Daniel b. 1827, d. c 1860
ChartsZachariah Davis
WILLIAM BASSE
ZACHARIAS DAVIS
Birth*22 June 1845 Shadrick D. Floyd was born on 22 June 1845 at Pulaski County, GA.2 
 He was the son of Amos Kinchen Floyd and Anna Luttia Mc Daniel
MARRIAGE*1 July 1866 He married Elizza (Louisa or Louise) Davis, daughter of Zacharias Davis and Elizabeth King, on 1 July 1866 at GA.3,4,5 
MARRIAGE*18 May 1888 He married Bettie Stewart on 18 May 1888 at GA "Sometime prior to the 1900 Census Tom left town with his brother in-law's widow and second wife Betty "Bett" Stewart. Shade Floyd was married to Eliza Davis (Tom's sister) then Bett Stewart. Tom and Bet are found in the 1900 census living in Henry County, Alabama. Tom and Bett later moved to Rebecca Georgia where they both died. Bett died of TB and is buried in Pleasant Hill Cemetery without a headstone."
Note from Ed Harmon.6 
MARRIAGE*14 December 1902 He married Polly Hartley, daughter of Fate Hartley, on 14 December 1902.5 
Burial*1916 He was buried in 1916 at Floyd Family Cemetery, Bleckley County, GA.7,8
Death*1916 He died in 1916 at Twiggs County, GA, Twiggs County Georgia is located between Cochran and Macon. There is no clue what took Shade to Twiggs County.9,7 
Nickname  Shadrick D. Floyd also went by the name of Shade Floyd. 
CENSUS1860*1860  In the 1860 Census he was shown living in house # 183. 
MILITARY*25 March 1864 He served in the military on 25 March 1864 at GA Anderson's Battery Roster says he was mustered in Dalton two years after his brothers. Roster also states that the only other person mustered in on this date was J.M Dupree who likewise was joining an older brother. Possible Shade and J.M. Dupree traveled together by train to Dalton to join Anderson's Battery. They were then involved in the Battle and Seige of Atlanta and followed Sherman's troops as he marched to the sea.10 
CENSUS1870*1870  In 1870 He lived next door to Zachariah Davis whose daughter he had married in 1866. In fact, he may have been living with his father-in-law.11 
CENSUS1880*1880 He appeared on the Census in 1880 at GA; Living in house # 445 between his brother GW and his father Amos and two doors from other brother Frederick.12 
GUARDIAN B*11 February 1892  On 11 February 1892 Shadrick Floyd was appointed guardian 1 Feb 1892; Mary A.E. & James E. FLOYD minors of Shadrick FLOYD. (I have no clue what this means since the mother of the children died in 1888 and Shade had married Betty Burns by this time.) 
CENSUS1900*1900 He appeared on the census in 1900 at GA; In 1900 Shade was not married and lived alone with his elderly father, Amos Kinchen Floyd, who died later that year.13
These pages show Amos, Shade and James E. as well as other Floyds living very close to one another.
MLTPENSION*13 September 1901 He received a military pension on 13 September 1901; Application for indigent pension states that he enlisted in Dec of 1863 and surrendered at Greensboro, NC in April of 1865. Application for pension based on infirmity and poverty. "I was wounded during the war in the hip and have never been enitirely well since. Have frequent attacks of Rheumatism - general breaking down." Possess no property. Have had no real property in the years 1894-1899 and am supported by the labor of "my two sons" The physician's affidavit states "struck by a shell at Savannah, GA in 1864 during an engagement, as a result has never been strong and vigorous since. Since then has suffered with general debility of soul, also suffers from recurrent attacks of Rheumatism." Pension was granted and received through 1907. He served in CSA Company B Montgomery. 
CENSUS1910*1910 He appeared on the census in 1910 at Trippville G.M.3876, Pulaski County, GA; In 1910 Shad is shown as the head of household with a middle initial of"D". He is living with wife Polly age 38, Arthur Darsey, stepson, Millie M. Paul, step daughter, Allie Hartley , daughter-in-law and a female named Emma ? age 10 , stepdaughter.14
Biography*13 June 1951  On June 13, 1951 Tina Floyd, his grandaughter,wrote to the Department of the Army requesting information on her grandfather's (Shade Floyd) military service. The following is the response she received: "The records show that Shade Floyd, private, Captain R.W.. Anderson's Battery, Palmer's Battalion Reserve Artillery, which subsequently became Captain Anderson's Battery, Georgia Light Artillery, Confederate States Army, enlisted 25 March 1864 at Dalton, Georgia. The company muster roll for November and December 1864, last on file, shows him present. He was paroled 2 May 1865 at Greensboro, North Carolina, in accordance with the terms of a Military Convention entered into 26 April 1865 between General Joseph E. Johnston, commanding confederate Army, and Major General W. T. Sherman, commanding United States Army in North Carolina." Signed, William E. Bergin, Major General USA

From unpublished records compiled by Lillian Henderson for the State of Georgia we learn that: Shade D. Floyd enlisted as a private in Company B 14th Battalion Georgia Light Artillery on March 25, 1864. He surrendered at Greensboro, North Carolina April 26, 1864. The captain of this company was Thomas H. Dawson.
A letter addressed to Mr. Ruel Anderson of Hawkinsville, Georgia dated February 14, 1951 seeks information about Shade Floyd's service in Capt. Ruel Anderson's regiment. Addressee is the grandson of Capt. Anderson. The response is a short note stating: Your grandfather (Mr. Shade Floyd) was in my father's company, Anderson's Battery. They fought in the Battle of Chattanooga and Missionary Ridge and the Battle of Atlanta and New Hope Church, Jonesboro, Georgia and other battles on down through Georgia. Signed by what appears to be Harriet (last name illegible) Note: perhaps she is the daughter of the Captain. The Civil War Records at the Georgia Department of Archives and History show S.D. Floyd receiving an Indigent Pension on the basis of service in Company B. of Montgomery's Artillery. It was signed by him with an "X" on September. 13, 1901 and states that he was born on June 22, 1845 in Pulaski Co., Georgia, was with Company B in Dalton, Georgia on December 1863 also in Anderson's Battery. He served nearly two years and surrendered in Greensboro, NC. April 1865. He based application for pension on infirmity and poverty. "I was wounded during the war in the hip and have never been entirely well since - have frequent attacks of Rheumatism - general breaking down. Possess no property (none shown for years 1894-1899) and am supported by the labor of "my two sons" In response to the question of "Do you have a homestead?" he replied "No". The affidavit was witnessed by J.C. Grimsley who said he enlisted with S. D. and served with him, surrendered with him at Greensboro and has lived within three miles of him for forty years.

Physicians Affidavit - Description of precise physical condition ".. Struck by a shell at Savannah, Ga. in 1864 during an engagement, as result has never been strong and vigorous since. Since then he has suffered with general debility from soul (depression?), also suffers from recurrent attacks of Rheumatism. Pension was recorded as received in 1902-1906 starting at age 56.

Shade Floyd must have been embarrassed to ask for this indigent pension which required the acknowledgement and witness of his neighbors. The fact that it was needed, and that he was reduced to the level of requesting a pension gives a hint of the emotional and economic damage imposed on a whole generation by the terrible Civil War. What would Shade think if he could know that his suffering would be discovered and memorialized more than one hundred years after its occurrence? Would he recognize that his humiliating act which would be so carefully recorded in the state archives would upon its discovery shed a bright spot light on the most tragic and dark period of southern history? In an unwitting way, Shade's story like the story of his grandparents, Fed and Mourning Floyd serves to illuminate our past. Just as Frederick and Mourning were unknowing contributors to a history they could not read. And, just as their daughter, Francis Mary Ann became an accidental recorder of history when she chose to record her family's births in the Floyd family Bible, so too was Shadrach's act of humiliation became a key piece to a larger puzzle of life. Because of his need for the pension, and because of the state's persistent need to supply documention and affidavits his descendants can better know and appreciate the heritage won for us at so great a cost. Shade Floyd owned no land, left no possessions and held no office, but he did not live in vain.

The few family stories told in the mid twentieth century indicate that when Shadrick Floyd returned from the war, the only job available was that of filling stump holes on the farm of his half brother, Everett Floyd. Considering the devastation done to the South's economy by the war it is plain that Shade would have counted himself fortunate to have even this job for support. As a young man of only twenty years who had already experienced the traumas of life, Shade married Eliza Davis on July 1, 1866. Eliza was from a large family who lived near the area of the hauntingly beautiful moss-draped cypress swamp known as Bush's Mill. Eliza would die prematurely at the age of thirty-eight and only four of her children would survive her. The four were named: Archie, Anna Letitia (Sis), Mary Elizabeth (Babe), and James Edward who was born on March 25, 1875.

Shade also worked in a turpentine still. The distillation of turpentine is tough and dirty work involving a difficult procedure. Perhaps the sight of his father working so hard for someone else was a strong lesson for James Edward Floyd. He grew up in poverty, saw what it was like not to own land, and even knew the feeling of living in a home that belonged to someone else. Perhaps these are the lessons that forged the desire for a better life that would carry the next generation of the family into the twentieth century as land-owning successful businessmen. For the Civil War veteran, Shade Floyd, life never got much better. The turpentine still at Bailey's Park was within walking distance of the Everett Floyd place. Everett was Shade's half brother, and it was upon a piece of Everett's land that Eliza Davis Floyd, Shade's wife, was buried at a time of the year when the dogwood trees were their most glorious. What powerful feelings must have passed through the hearts of this family, emotions magnified to double size for the youngest son, James Edward Floyd who was only thirteen years old when his mother died? Certainly the events of his parents lives contributed to his discipline and conviction and the self-sufficiency that would be so evident throughout his life.

The year Shade's son, James Edward, was born (1876) was the Centennial celebration of the United States. It was a watershed time in American history with the industrial revolution becoming commonplace even in rural Georgia. The old pioneer ways were being swept out the door and the twentieth century was puffing into town on the train that ran so close to Bailey's Park. It was here around the turpentine industry that Shade Floyd found employment. The woods were full of the pine trees and a turpentine still was erected to harvest the sap which was shipped out on the railroad. As was common around industries, the owner of the company erected houses for his employees. Since there is good family tradition that Shadrick Floyd was employeed by the still, it is therefore, quite possible that he and his family inhabited one of the company houses. 
EMAIL*February 2001  Shadrack (Shade) Floyd is reported to have had a hot temper. He is quoted as having said: “If madness could be connected to steam, mine could pull a freight train loaded with buckshot.”.15 
Note*2002  This note from Shade's grandaughter, Annette Kaplan, describes BAILEY'S PARK. The only thing I rememberer from my childhood is that there was a small country store there and at election time it was a precinct where they counted the paper ballots and checked for Pole tax and Papa, James Edward Floyd, was always one of the officials at election time. There was also a swimming pool fed by boiling springs of icy cold, crystal clear water at the bottom of the hill with a changing room bath house for males and one side for females and we used to dive off the top into the pool. This all indicates to me that it was a small recreation area.
Civil War Memorial*November 2002  In November 2002 at Bleckley County, GA, In 2002, the work begun fifty years earlier by Tina Floyd was completed with the installation of a Civil War marker on Shade Floyd's grave. About 100 family members attended the ceremony which was marked by a canon salute from the local Civil War Historical group.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJIvOTv-_dY.
SHADE FLOYD

Family 1

Elizza (Louisa or Louise) Davis b. 8 August 1845, d. 6 March 1888
MARRIAGE*1 July 1866 He married Elizza (Louisa or Louise) Davis, daughter of Zacharias Davis and Elizabeth King, on 1 July 1866 at GA.3,4,5 
Children

Family 2

Bettie Stewart b. circa 1865
MARRIAGE*18 May 1888 He married Bettie Stewart on 18 May 1888 at GA "Sometime prior to the 1900 Census Tom left town with his brother in-law's widow and second wife Betty "Bett" Stewart. Shade Floyd was married to Eliza Davis (Tom's sister) then Bett Stewart. Tom and Bet are found in the 1900 census living in Henry County, Alabama. Tom and Bett later moved to Rebecca Georgia where they both died. Bett died of TB and is buried in Pleasant Hill Cemetery without a headstone."
Note from Ed Harmon.6 

Family 3

Polly Hartley b. 1873, d. 1938
MARRIAGE*14 December 1902 He married Polly Hartley, daughter of Fate Hartley, on 14 December 1902.5 
Last Edited14 Jun 2016

Citations

  1. [S109] Unknown subject State Archives of Georgia.
  2. [S106] Unknown subject unknown repository.
  3. [S335] Unknown subject unknown repository.
  4. [S377] Pulaski County Marriages.
  5. [S470] Doris Dixon, "La Verne papers."
  6. [S579] Ed Harmond, "Harmond," e-mail to MVW, Feb 8 2006.
  7. [S498] Wiregrass Genealogy Group, Floyd Cemetery.
  8. [S502] June Adams, Betsy Smith Robin Mullis, Bleckley County, Georgia Cemeteries.
  9. [S107] Unknown subject unknown repository.
  10. [S108] Unknown subject unknown repository.
  11. [S55] 1870 Census;, House # 870.
  12. [S56] 1880 Census;.
  13. [S59] 1900 Census;, Living alone at age 53 with father Amos.
  14. [S60] 1910 Census;.
  15. [S486] Donald Floyd, "Donald Floyd."

Sherman C. Floyd

M, #1415, b. January 1896
Possibly Sherman Floyd
Father*James Everette Floyd b. 10 Aug 1861, d. 30 Jun 1918
Mother*Mary Victoria (Mollie) Young b. Apr 1866, d. b 1920
ChartsWILLIAM BASSE
Birth*January 1896 Sherman C. Floyd was born in January 1896. 
 He was the son of James Everette Floyd and Mary Victoria (Mollie) Young
MARRIAGE*19 April 1925 He married Lelia Mae Sanders on 19 April 1925 This marriage is a guess. 
CENSUS1920*1920 He appeared on the census in 1920 at Bleckley County, GA.1 
CENSUS1930*1930 He appeared on the census in 1930 at GA.2 

Family

Lelia Mae Sanders
Last Edited25 Apr 2006

Citations

  1. [S61] 1920 Census;, Sown living with his siblings.
  2. [S518] 1930 Census;.

Stephen Floyd

M, #1087, b. 1709
Father*John Floyd b. 1690, d. c 1756
Birth*1709 Stephen Floyd was born in 1709 at King Wiilliam, Va.1 
 He was the son of John Floyd
Last Edited21 Jan 2006

Citations

  1. [S577] Bill Jones, "Bill Jones," e-mail to MVW, January 2006.

Stephen F. Floyd

M, #1383, b. October 1862
Father*Frederick Floyd b. 1841, d. 7 Jan 1924
Mother*Roxy Ann Blount b. Jan 1846, d. 1927
ChartsWILLIAM BASSE
MARRIAGE* Stephen F. Floyd married Lizzie (?) 
Birth*October 1862 He was born in October 1862. 
 He was the son of Frederick Floyd and Roxy Ann Blount
MARRIAGE*circa 1878 He married Elizabeth (Lizzie) (?) circa 1878.1 
CENSUS18701870 He appeared on the census in 1870 at Pulaski County, GA.2 
CENSUS18801880 He appeared on the Census in 1880 at GA.3 
Census*1900 He appeared on the census of 1900 at Dodge County, GA.4 
CENSUS1910*1910  Living in the Trippville area not far from Shade Floyd. 

Family 1

Lizzie (?) b. circa 1854
MARRIAGE* He married Lizzie (?) 

Family 2

Elizabeth (Lizzie) (?) b. March 1855
MARRIAGE*circa 1878 He married Elizabeth (Lizzie) (?) circa 1878.1 
Children
Last Edited12 Aug 2003

Citations

  1. [S56] 1880 Census;, Living in house # 447 with parents.
  2. [S55] 1870 Census;, Living in house # 889 with parents.
  3. [S56] 1880 Census;, Living in house # 447 with wife.
  4. [S148] Unknown subject unknown repository.

Susan Floyd

F, #1459, b. May 1894
Father*Charles F. Floyd b. Jan 1862
Mother*Martha (?) b. May 1875
ChartsWILLIAM BASSE
Birth*May 1894 Susan Floyd was born in May 1894. 
 She was the daughter of Charles F. Floyd and Martha (?) 
Last Edited17 Aug 1994

Susan Floyd1

F, #3940, b. 1 May 1813, d. 13 June 1880
Father*Thomas Penuel Floyd Sr.1 b. c 1764, d. May 1815
Mother*Mary Sarah Beckwith1
Birth*1 May 1813 Susan Floyd was born on 1 May 1813.1 
 She was the daughter of Thomas Penuel Floyd Sr. and Mary Sarah Beckwith.1 
Death*13 June 1880 She died on 13 June 1880 at age 67.1 
Married Name Her married name was Davidson.1 
Last Edited8 Nov 2007

Citations

  1. [S486] Donald Floyd, "Donald Floyd."

Temperance Floyd1

F, #3946
Father*Thomas Penuel Floyd Sr.1 b. c 1764, d. May 1815
Mother*Mary Sarah Beckwith1
Birth* Temperance Floyd was born at Nash, N.C.1 
 She was the daughter of Thomas Penuel Floyd Sr. and Mary Sarah Beckwith.1 
Married Name Her married name was Griffin.1 
Last Edited7 Mar 2004

Citations

  1. [S486] Donald Floyd, "Donald Floyd."

Thomas Floyd1

M, #1071, b. circa 1680
Reference0200
Birth*circa 1680 Thomas Floyd was born circa 1680 at Isle of Wight County, VA. 
MARRIAGE*circa 1690 Thomas Floyd married Joanna Goodson, daughter of Edward Goodson and Mary Phillips, circa 1690; Note from MVW in 4-04: It appears that Matthew Lowry her second husband) knew and/or was a friend of Joanna's first husband, Floyd. Therefore, I suspect her first husband was named Thomas since Matthew and Thomas owned adjoining property. Also, Thomas Floyd witnessed a 1711 land sale in Isle of Wight where Thomas Pitt sold land to Matthew Lowry. Thomas Pitt was the father of aHester Pitt who married into the Bridger family. The Goodsons and Bridger family were neighbors. On the other hand Don Floyd has this opinion:The Francis Floyd who was witness to the sale of land on June 8, 1698, by Richard Reynolds Sr. to Richard Reynolds Jr., is a candidate for being the first husband of Joanna Goodson. The deed noted that the land was in occupation of Edward Goodson, William West, John Tyler and Richard Reynolds. Edward Goodson, of course, was the father of Joanna Goodson. This Francis Floyd may have died about 1720.2 
Biography*  The Floyds and their uniqueness written by Don Floyd


The Floyd family is a fascinating study, veiled at times with mystery and often muddled by elfish unpredictability. They are unique. They are rare. They are elusive. But 35 years of persistent research has uncovered some amazing stories about them, who they were, and who they married.

Still, there are gaps in the story, much like missing pieces from a jigsaw puzzle. When the puzzle is assembled to near completion, the viewer can analyze the shape and size of the missing pieces and gain additional clues to what they are by observing the scenery around them. The Floyds of the past can be found. That is a fact. But don’t count on doing it without considerable work and perseverance.

Their greatest talent, it seems, was the ability to marry well. This suggests that they were a handsome and strong lot and were attractive to women needing safety amid unsafe surroundings. And when we say, “marry well” we are talking, for example, about an 1803 wedding in North Carolina where Mourning Bass, a descendant from the high wealth of London, married Federick Floyd, a man of humble background. Mourning’s earliest Bass ancestor to make a home in Virginia was John Basse (the original French spelling) along with his Nansemond Indian wife. But Mourning’s rich genealogical trail goes back further to London and to the elite of Northern France.

The Basse families were among the few Europeans to settle in Virginia about 1618 and survive the Powhatan Indian Massacre of 1622 when 347 Englishmen were slain. John remembered London well, but he soon found himself adjusting in Virginia to what circumstances required. During this ongoing lifestyle change, he married the daughter of the king of the militant Nansemond Nation (called tribe today) and chose to live with the Nansemonds, thereby enjoying the protection afforded to his Nansemond wife.

As we continue our research today we often find family historical nuggets that are nothing short of phenomenal. One such story features Nathaniel Basse, who in 1616 inherited his father’s stock in The Virginia Company, a corporation intended as a moneymaking enterprise in The New World. But that stock was only a very small portion of Humfrey Basse’s overall wealth in London. He left a will that is one of the longest in English history. The stock most likely brought Nathaniel to Virginia for further investment. Before it was over, however, he most likely suffered some financial losses. So did The Virginia Company which never turned a profit.

Beginning about 1622, Nathaniel Basse operated Basse’s Choice, a plantation commonly called a hundred, south of the James River very near present-day Smithfield. He also served in the House of Burgesses in 1623 and 1629, and he served in the Colonial Council between 1624 and 1629 and was the chief judicial authority in the area of Basse’s Choice. He also traveled, under orders of the governor, to such places as Nova Scotia, Dutch settlements and possibly the West Indies to negotiate trade deals. He was a key figure in early American history but history books have for the most part ignored him.

About 1623, after apparently coming to America from Northern Ireland and possibly having a link to southwestern Scotland (this is not proven), Thomas Floyd lived at West and Sherlow Hundred near Jamestown, as is documented by early records. After examining the records of all Floyds of the 17th century in Virginia and surrounding areas between 1618 and 1700, we conclude that this Thomas Floyd most likely was our first ancestor, in Virginia, but we have no proof.

The Floyd family became centered in Isle of Wight County, Va., and there were many there by 1700. Other Floyds lived in various parts of the colony, but none seemed to be related to us. Some of them, in fact, most likely were Welsh. Family oral history says we are Irish, but it is possible – though not proven – that we are Scots-Irish, who lived in Northern Ireland and originally were from Scotland.

One factor that impedes research of our Floyds is our rarity. The National Genographic Project along with National Geographic have confirmed that our Floyds possess DNA that places us in Haplogroup G, which makes up about 3 percent of the world’s population, and the Floyds make up a small fraction of that 3 percent.
There are some Floyds from Ireland who do not share our DNA. And there is one family of Floyds that is neither Irish nor Scottish. It is Welsh. Their original name was ap Lloyd, the gray one, and this name evolved into Floyd. In our case, the Gaelic name Tuile, was anglicized to Flood while under English dominion and evolved into Floyd or Floid possibly because of the way Irishmen pronounced Flood: “flow-id.”

One of the more exciting features of the Floyd story is its link with two men of kinship who put America on a course toward permanency and eventually toward national sovereignty. Nathaniel Basse was one. Another was Basse’s father in law, Samuel Jordan, who was among a handful of Englishmen involved in saving Jamestown from collapse during its darkest hour about 1610. Three months before The Mayflower, Samuel Jordan in June 1609 boarded The Sea Venture in Plymouth and set sail for the New World. The recently built state-of-the art vessel, was one of eight ships to set sail that day on a mission called The Third Supply, providing new settlers and provisions for a corporation called Virginia.

Six to eight weeks out, the flotilla ran into a powerful storm – assumed to be a hurricane – and was pummeled for almost 48 hours. The Sea Venture could not hold up during the storm because it had a major flaw. Its calking had not been allowed to thoroughly dry before the ship’s departure. The other seven ships survived and proceeded to Jamestown. The Sea Venture, meanwhile, was foundering somewhere in the unseen distance. Directly, the ship’s master spotted land and ordered the ship in that direction. The ship became snared between two coral reefs – which may have been a saving factor for the passengers. The ship never sank and all passengers and crew were believed to have survived. However, there were some deaths on land weeks to months after the passengers went ashore. Their temporary home there was not just any ordinary spot on the globe. As it turns out, they were stranded in the Bermudas where bizarre maritime mysteries today are all the rage and UFO theories are seemingly delivered to TV stations by the truckload.

Samuel Jordan and the rest undertook to build two small ships from Sea Venture salvage and from such native Bermuda resources as cedar. It took 10 months or so to finish the two ships and then set sail for Jamestown in 1610. Samuel Jordan and the others apparently had lived in a healthy environment in the Bermudas. After arriving in Jamestown, they were shocked by what they saw: blank stares, emaciated bodies, disarray, and a seeming desire to flee the misery of life. Of a one-time population of about 500, only 50 or so were left, and they were planning to set sail for England the next day. But Samuel Jordan and his associates were able to revive their spirits, provide food for the hungry and comfort the sick.

Within a few days, the 50 were feeling good about staying in Virginia. It was one of the most important developments in American history – perhaps the most important. Without it, today’s America would not exist. Instead, Spain would rule. It is reported that Spain had already used spies and poison against Jamestown.

There is much more we are sharing in this book about the Floyds and related families, but above all, we are presenting a human story – a story made up of many human stories. We have, for the most part, shunned lists. We want to bring you face to face with your ancestors so that you might see who they were and how they lived. After all, when you look in the mirror today, they are there looking back.2 
Note*before 1700  Before 1700 at VA There were a number of Floyds in 17th century Virginia. The first was Nathaniel said to have been age 25 when he came from England in the early 1600's. Don Floyd does not think he was an ancestor because there are no Nathaniels in later generations In addition there was an Edward probably born about 1665 and a couple of later Nathaniels as well as Thomas and Francis. We may never know who was the father of Thomas the first husband of Joanna Lowry, but the more I research the more I become convinced that our earliest known Floyd ancestor is Thomas husband of Joanna Goodson.
A deed in 1699 in Virginia from Edward Cobb (the Cobbs seemed to live near the Lowrys and the Lowrys lived near the Floyds) gives a boundry line of "Floyds Creek that ran out of Pagan Creek". The fact that a creek is named Floyd implies that the land has been held for a while and was widely known as a landmark.

Don Floyd believes Joanna's husband was named Francis. Here is his logic: "The Francis Floyd who was witness to the sale of land on June 8, 1698, by Richard Reynolds Sr. to Richard Reynolds Jr., is a candidate for being the first husband of Joanna Goodson. The deed noted that the land was in occupation of Edward Goodson, William West, John Tyler and Richard Reynolds. Edward Goodson, of course, was the father of Joanna Goodson. This Francis Floyd may have died about 1720." We may never know for sure, but its safe to think that it was either Francis or Thomas. 
LANDCONTRA21 September 1711 He purchased land on 21 September 1711 Thomas and his brother purchased l150 acres of land from Bridgeman Joyner for 5,000 pounds of tobacco. The deed was signed by Bridgeman B. Joyner and Anne Joyner and was witnessed by Matthew Lowry.3 
Death*circa 1722 He died circa 1722 at VA; Joanna is called Joan Floyd in her father's will. She is also executrix.4 
LANDCONTRA*1741 He purchased land in 1741 at VA.2 
Note2004  In 2004 Here is a note I wrote to Don Floyd along with his reply. It may prove useful for future research. "Have you examined a 1993 book called Isle of Wight County, Va Deeds 1647-1719 by William Lindsay Hopkins? Several years ago I tried to get it on interlibrary loan, but the best I could get were all the references to Bass and Floyd. Its taken me two years to get around to digesting what I have here and that is the source of my recent interest in the early Floyds. The book lists Edward, Frances, Harry, Nathaniel and Thomas Floyd. I don't think Harry is ours as he lives in the upper county and ours lived in the lower county.
Nathaniel is mentioned only once so I'm guessing he might be the father of Edward, Francis and Thomas. (I found an old old note in my file saying Mary (relic of Nathan) so we could possibly have both parents here.)
A John Portis, Jr. with a wife named Deborah is mentioned as well as a John Portis Sr. connected with William Boddie These entries are for 1694 and 1698. In addition I find an Edward Goodson (could be Joana's father.) Nathaniel is listed only once and his land is described as being on a neck of land on the main creek of Warrrisquake Bay."

Here is Don's reply: Haven't seen the Hopkins book. The Harry Floyd, I believe, is sometimes referred to as Harry Flood or Harry Flud. Don't think he's ours. Don't think Nathaniel is ours either. See "A Man With No Heirs" on Page 71 of my book (Don said this because the estate of Nathaniel escheated and Don takes this to mean there were no heirs. (But his contradicts the note above mentioning Mery the relick of Nathan indicating that she was his widow - and heir.) (I told Don it could also mean that no heirs could be found as they had all gone to North Carolina). However, it is possible that Nathaniel outlived his sons. I think Francis and Thomas are ours, but have no proof. I theorized that Joana's first husband was Thomas Floyd, and that he was the father of the Francis and Thomas Floyd who migrated from Isle of Wight county Virginia to Edgecombe county North Carolina. Francis and Thomas definitely were the sons of Joana Goodson Floyd Lowry. I'm almost certain that Edward Goodson was the father of Joana Goodson Floyd Lowry. I have theorized that an earlier Thomas Floyd was our first American, but that is almost a wild guess. If he was, he would have been in America almost as earlier as Nathaniel Bass. John Portis is a real mystery. He apparently was originally John Floyd and could have been adopted by a Portis. 

Family

Joanna Goodson b. 1670, d. 1736
MARRIAGE*circa 1690 He married Joanna Goodson, daughter of Edward Goodson and Mary Phillips, circa 1690; Note from MVW in 4-04: It appears that Matthew Lowry her second husband) knew and/or was a friend of Joanna's first husband, Floyd. Therefore, I suspect her first husband was named Thomas since Matthew and Thomas owned adjoining property. Also, Thomas Floyd witnessed a 1711 land sale in Isle of Wight where Thomas Pitt sold land to Matthew Lowry. Thomas Pitt was the father of aHester Pitt who married into the Bridger family. The Goodsons and Bridger family were neighbors. On the other hand Don Floyd has this opinion:The Francis Floyd who was witness to the sale of land on June 8, 1698, by Richard Reynolds Sr. to Richard Reynolds Jr., is a candidate for being the first husband of Joanna Goodson. The deed noted that the land was in occupation of Edward Goodson, William West, John Tyler and Richard Reynolds. Edward Goodson, of course, was the father of Joanna Goodson. This Francis Floyd may have died about 1720.2 
Children
Last Edited18 Feb 2009

Citations

  1. The Floyd family is difficult to trace. They left relatively few records and constantly used the same names over and over. My suspicion is that the North Carolina Floyds descended from the early Floyds of Virginia, perhaps even from Nathaniel, but there is no real proof. However, Joanna Goodson Floyd Lowry is definately a descendant of a Virginia family making the connection quite likely. This progenitor is an educated guess based upon the following logic:
    There are both a Thomas Floyd and a Matthew Lowry who appear numerous times in the records about 1711 (the year that Joanna likely would have started having children) Joanna has children named both Thomas Floyd and Matthew Lowry, but neither this Thomas(#1071) nor Matthew can be Joanna's children as she did not marry Lowry until after 1724 as evidenced by her father's will of that year where she is called Floid. I believe she married Thomas Floyd (#1071) first and then married his friend Matthew Lowry when Thomas died. This also explains her use of their names.
    There are two estate appraisements in Isle of Wight. One for Francis Floyd in 1741 and the other for Thomas Floyd in 1760. I believe that one or the other of these is Joanna's father-in-law and the other is his brother. Neither can be Joanna's children as there is a full and complete record of her Thomas and Francis in North Carolina and they died well after the above dates.
  2. [S490] Donald R. Floyd, The Elusive Floyds.
  3. [S617] James Lowry, "Lowry," e-mail to MVW, Feb 18, 2007.
  4. [S476] Blanche Adams Chapman, Isle of Wight Wills.

Thomas Floyd1

M, #1084, b. say 1730, d. before 27 July 1780
Father*Thomas Floyd b. s 1694, d. 1760
Birth*say 1730 Thomas Floyd was born say 1730 at Isle of Wight County, VA. 
 He was the son of Thomas Floyd
MARRIAGE*1756 He married Ann (?) (?) in 1756 This is the year that Ann's name starts appearing with husband Thomas on Deeds.2 
Death*before 27 July 1780 He died before 27 July 1780 at Northampton, NC, He is shown on the Bute county Tax list having come from Edgecomb. In the records of Bute (Vol. II Journal of NC Geneology) he is shown as having three slaves and a son named Amos. It was the son named Amos that caused me to think he is the father of Amos, Shadrick and Fed Floyd. I've only found one Amos in the area.
item 379 p. 35 says "...it being part of a tract of land formerly granted by deed from Thomas Floyd deceased 7-27-1780". I do not know the significance of the above date. Do know that Thomas was dead by 1795 when his wife's will was filed calling her widow of Thomas.3 
Milit-Beg*circa 1750 He began military service circa 1750 at Militia, Edgecomb, NC. 
ADMINISTRA*26 June 1759  On 26 June 1759 at Edgecomb, NC, Thomas Floyd is granted administration of the estate of Joseph Richardson upon relinquishment of right of his widow. The abstract mentions that there is an inventory of the estate that was exhibited as well.4 
MINUTES*March 1762 He was mentioned in the court minutes "Ordered that the following persons lay off road leading out of the road that crosses Swift Creek at the Bridge near RICKMAN’s store between the store and Greens Path and then near the Plumb Tree Bottom above < > into the road: Mathew DRAKE, Nath’l DRAKE, William DRAKE, Francis PARKER, Isaac HILLIARD, Thos MAIN (?), Henry BECKWITH, Thos FLOYD, John WILLIAMS, William BRASWELL, Francis JONES,
William TAYLOR, Jacob HILLIARD, Thos. WILLIAMS, Jacob BRASWELL, Joseph SUMNER, Simon JOHNSON, Henry BRASWELL overseer and the following work on the same: Isaac HILLIARD, Henry BECKWITH, Ebenezer FOLSOME, William BRASWELL, William HUNT, Jacob Whitehead, DAWSON, William NORRIS, William HORN, Francis JENKINS, Edmund REVELL, John SPIKES, Thos. SPIKES, William SPIKES, John WOODARD, William DANIEL, Francis JONES, Mathew DRAKE, Nath’l DRAKE, Mary WILLIAMS." This is an important document as it shows association with the Drake family with whom the Floyd's were related through marriage. in March 1762 at NC. 
COUNTY CHANGE1764  In 1764 at Granville, NC, Bute County formed from eastern part of Granville County. 
LANDCONTRA1764 He sold land in 1764 at NC; Ann and Thomas Floyd sold land to Jonas Williams.5 
LANDCONTRA1770 He sold land in 1770; Ann and Thomas sold land to William Battle.5 
Census*1771 He appeared on the census of 1771 at Bute, N.C; the state census shows: Thomas Floyd- State: NC Year: 1771 County: Bute County Record Type: Township: Page: Database: NC Early Census Index. 
TAXROLL*1771  In 1771 at Bute, NC, He came to Bute from Edgecomb Co., NC. He is shown in the records of Bute (Vol. II Journal of NC Genealogy) as having three slaves and a son named Amos. (Bute County North Carolina later became Franklin County North Carolina.) 
LANDCONTRA19 May 1772 He purchased land on 19 May 1772 at NC Parramon Floyd sold land to Thomas Floyd. Abstract states the following: Edgecomb on March 6, 1773 for 70 pounds Virginia money a tract of land 140 acres on the north side of Swifts Creek it being a part of a tract of 288 acres conveyed to Francis Floyd by William Kinchen. By the will of Francis Floyd this 140 acres including the manor Plantation was bequeath to his son Parramon Floyd who conveyed it to said Thomas Floyd 5-19-1772.6 
TAXROLL1773 He was on the tax roll in 1773 at N.C FLOYD, THOMAS State: NC Year: 1773 County: Bute County Record Type: Township: Early Tax List Page: Database: NC Early Census Index. 
LANDCONTRA*6 March 1773 He purchased land on 6 March 1773 at NC Abstract states the following: Edgecomb on March 6, 1773 for 70 pounds Virginia money a tract of land 140 acres on the north side of Swifts Creek it being a part of a tract of 288 acres conveyed to Francis Floyd by William Kinchen. (Its interesting that the name Kinchen will persist in the family until the early 1800's in the form of Amos Kinchen Floyd) By the will of Francis Floyd this 140 acres including the manor Plantation was bequeath to his son Parramon Floyd who conveyed it to said Thomas Floyd 5-19-1772.6 
LANDCONTRA1774 He sold land in 1774 at NC; Ann and Thomas sold land to John Battle. Battle's will Jan 22 1774 mentions buying 140 acre plantation on north side of Swift Creek.5 
DEEDMay 1774 He was shown on a deed in May 1774 at N.C A Deed from William Halle and Mary Halle to Tho's Floyd was proved by the oath of Amos Floyd a Witness thereto and on Motion the same is Ordered to be registered. This is from the Bute county Court Minutes 1767-1779 available at ancestry.com. 
DEED*8 November 1774 He was shown on a deed on 8 November 1774 at N.C Bute County, North Carolina Minutes of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, 1767-1779 8 November 1774 A Deed from Thomas Floyd and Ann his wife to Nathan Whitley was proved by the Oath of Frederik Jones a witness & on Motion the same is Ordered to be Registered. Don Floyd has speculated that Frederick Jones could be Anne's father and this is how the Frederick name came into family. Pure speculation. 
COUNTY CHANGE1776  In 1776 at NC Part of Northampton annexed to Bute. 
COUNTY CHANGE*1777  In 1777 at N.C Bute County abolished and it became Franklin and Warren County. 
INVENTORY*before 1795 Here is estate inventory His estate included a negro girl named Esther age about 10, a feather bed and furniture, five spoons, 4 case knives and five forks. ( I just read an interesting book based on South Carolina estates and learned that sometimes an estate was not settled until the wife died. Also learned that it could take almost a lifetime to accumulate enough feathers for a bed making them valuable pieces of property.) 
Biography*1999  In 1999 Here are some thoughts MVW recorded while attempting to sort out the early Floyd family: PERHAPS this is the same Thomas who appears in the 1771 records of Bute County and is shown as having a son and three slaves. If this assumption can be proved correct, it links the Virginia and North Carolina Floyds. The appearance of a Floyd in 1771 is one of the earliest events documented of the existence and location of a Floyd ancestor in North Carolina. In fact, Thomas Floyd of Bute County 1771 is a direct ancestor since there is a will for his son, Amos, who in turn names a brother Frederick, and it is the brother Frederick who married Mourning Bass and emigrated to Georgia.
Linking Thomas Floyd from Virginia to Thomas of North Carolina is circumstantial, but often imagination and educated guesses are necessary in the face of skimpy facts that can never be fully documented due to sometimes complete destruction of records in court house fires. (The reliability of imagination is more likely in colonial times when the population of the whole of the thirteen colonies was just over 1.5 million people than it would be in the 20th century when many cities contain the same number of inhabitants. In addition, the difficulty of travel makes it more likely that individuals found in a locality were of the same family.)
Even though our first probable Floyd ancestor is not officially recorded in North Carolina records until 1771 we still know that by the year 1751 the Floyds were sufficiently established in Edgecomb County, North Carolina to consider it home. They had arrived in the state from Virginia in a time of incredible growth for the area. The counties were being formed and reformed in order to meet the needs of the developing population for county government was the most essential body for early settlers. Roads were poor, postal service rudimentary and the telephone almost two hundred years in the future, and yet it was necessary for citizens to conduct business regularly at the court house. This meant that as the population grew it became necessary to create smaller and smaller counties in order to handle the increased load of business as well as get the county seat within a reasonable travel distance from the citizens it served. No farmer could afford to be away from home for extended periods of time and yet the requirements of conveying land and disposing of property meant that access to the courts be possible for all. We see large, early counties being divided and sub-divided and it is possible to track the growth of population by looking at the number of divisions as well as the rapidity with which they took place.
In North Carolina one of the earliest counties was Perquimans which was formed in 1670 and from which was formed Bertie County. In 1741 Bertie developed into Northampton and Edgecomb and when we remember that Thomas Floyd of Virginia bought land in Edgecomb County in 1746 only five years after the formation of the county, we see that he was one on the many whose entrance into the area caused this cell-like division and redivision of the counties. It would only take seventeen years until in 1758 Halifax County split from Edgecomb and then again twenty years later in 1777 Nash County appeared from Edgecomb.
A glimpse at court records reveals many of the day to day details of colonial life. It seems that there was always some detail of life that required a court appearance. There were wills to be presented for probate, reports to orphan's court regarding the minor children in ones care as a result of some parents untimely death. There were Letters of Administration to secure, Reports of Appraisals and the ever present duty of jury service. Court days were scheduled regularly so that those having business would be in town and it is possible to find an ancestor listed as a witness at a trial or to a document, will or deed letting us know that on that date a particular person was in town on business. Citizens of the twentieth century often handle routine matters by letter and seldom see the inside of a court house. Their ancestors were ever more familiar with an institution that next to the church was the central rallying point of civilization.
the court defined, recorded and supervised the division and disposition of the land. Land was life. It was the family business and all of life revolved around the proper administration of the land, a duty of the county court system. All record keeping and paperwork were properly the functions of court house clerks. 

Family

Ann (?) (?) b. circa 1740, d. 1795
MARRIAGE*1756 He married Ann (?) (?) in 1756 This is the year that Ann's name starts appearing with husband Thomas on Deeds.2 
Children
Last Edited1 Aug 2008

Citations

  1. [S87] Unknown subject unknown repository.
  2. [S490] Donald R. Floyd, The Elusive Floyds, p.51.
  3. [S475] Watson, Northampton Abstracts.
  4. [S578] Jr. Dorman, Edgecomb county N.C. abstracts of Court Minutes 1744-46, 1757-94.
  5. [S553] LDS Film;, 0370234.
  6. [S480] Watson, Edgecomb Abstracts.
  7. [S535] Unknown compiler, Franklin Probate.

Thomas Floyd

M, #1094
Father*Morrise Floyd b. 1701, d. c 1792
Mother*Mary Walthrop
 Thomas Floyd was the son of Morrise Floyd and Mary Walthrop
CENSUS1800*1800 He appeared on the census in 1800 at Franklin, NC.1 
Last Edited20 May 2004

Citations

  1. [S46] 1800 Census;, Not sure if this is the same Thomas, but its possible.

Thomas Floyd

M, #3954, b. 1703
Father*John Floyd b. 1690, d. c 1756
Birth*1703 Thomas Floyd was born in 1703.1 
 He was the son of John Floyd
Last Edited21 Jan 2006

Citations

  1. [S577] Bill Jones, "Bill Jones," e-mail to MVW, January 2006.

Thomas Floyd

M, #5122, b. say 1694, d. 1760
Father*Thomas Floyd b. c 1680
Mother*Joanna Goodson b. 1670, d. 1736
Birth*say 1694 Thomas Floyd was born say 1694. 
 He was the son of Thomas Floyd and Joanna Goodson
Death*1760 He died in 1760 His estate was appraised by Tristran Norsworthy, George Norsworthy and Thomas Parker Ordered December 4 1760. He appeared in the records again in 1767 as the estate was not settled. An account was examined by Nicholas Parker and Thomas Parker.1 
Biography*  Here is a piece written by Don Floyd:

The Floyds and their uniqueness

T
he Floyd family is a fascinating study, veiled at times with mystery and often muddled by elfish unpredictability. They are unique. They are rare. They are elusive. But persistent research over a span of 35 years has uncovered some amazing stories about them, who they were, and whom they married.

Still, there are gaps in the story, much like missing pieces from a jigsaw puzzle. When the puzzle is assembled to near completion, the viewer can analyze the shape and size of the missing pieces and gain additional clues to what they are by observing the scenery around them. We consider our book, The Elusive Floyds, a beginning. Future research will reveal more. The Floyds are elusive, but they can be found.

Their greatest talent, it seems, was the ability to marry well. This suggests that they were a handsome and strong lot and were attractive to women needing safety amid unsafe surroundings. And when we say “marry well,” we are talking, for example, about an 1803 wedding in North Carolina where Mourning Bass, a descendant from the high wealth of London, married Federick Floyd, a man of humble background. Mourning’s earliest Bass ancestor to make a home in Virginia was John Basse (the original French spelling) along with his Nansemond Indian wife. But Mourning’s rich genealogical trail goes back further to London and to the elite families of Northern France.

The Basse family were among the few Europeans to settle in Virginia about 1618 and survive the Powhatan Indian Massacre of 1622 when 347 Englishmen were slain. John remembered London well, but he soon found himself adjusting in Virginia to what circumstances required. During this ongoing lifestyle change, he married the daughter of the king of the militant Nansemond Nation (called tribe today) in 1638 and chose to live with the Nansemond Indians, thereby enjoying the protection afforded to his Nansemond wife.

As we continue our research today, we often find family historical nuggets that are nothing short of phenomenal. One such story features Nathaniel Basse, who in 1616 inherited his father’s stock in The Virginia Company. But that stock was only a very small portion of Humfrey Basse’s overall wealth. He left a will in London that is one of the longest in English history. The stock most likely brought Nathaniel to Virginia for further investment. Before it was over, however, he most likely suffered financial losses, as was the case with The Virginia Company, which never turned a profit, when its charter was revoked by King James I.

Beginning about 1622, Nathaniel Basse operated Basse’s Choice, a plantation commonly called a hundred, south of the James River very near present-day Smithfield. He also served in the House of Burgesses in 1623 and 1629, and in the Colonial Council between 1624 and 1629 and was the chief judicial authority in the area of Basse’s Choice. As a member of the House of Burgesses, he was instrumental in developing the model of representation for all future colonies, including Massachusetts. He also traveled, under orders of the governor, to such places as Nova Scotia, Dutch settlements and possibly the West Indies to negotiate trade deals. He was a key figure in early American history but history books have for the most part ignored him.

About 1623, after apparently coming to America from Northern Ireland and possibly having a link to southwestern Scotland, Thomas Floyd lived at West and Sherlow Hundred near Jamestown. Living at West and Sherlow suggests that he was an indentured servant working on the plantation. After examining the records of all Floyds of the 17th century in Virginia and surrounding areas between 1618 and 1700, we conclude that this Thomas Floyd most likely was our first ancestor in Virginia, but we have no proof. Our Floyds became centered in Isle of Wight County, Va. Family oral history says we are Irish, but it is possible that we are Scots-Irish, who lived in Northern Ireland and originally were from Scotland.

One factor that impedes Floyd research is our rarity. The National Geographic’s Genographic Project, an ongoing five-year DNA study of the migration patterns of humans from northeastern Africa over the past 60,000 years, confirmed that our Floyds possess DNA that places us in Haplogroup G, which makes up about 3 percent of the population, and our Floyds make up a small fraction of that 3 percent. There are some Floyds from Ireland who do not share our DNA. And there is one family of Floyds that is neither Irish nor Scottish. It is Welsh. Their original name was ap Lloyd, the gray one, and this name evolved into Floyd. In our case, the Gaelic name Tuile, was anglicized to Flood while under English dominion and evolved into Floyd or Floid possibly because of the way Irishmen pronounced Flood: “flow-id.”

One of the more exciting features of the Floyd story is its link with two men of kinship who put America on a course toward permanency and eventually toward national sovereignty. Nathaniel Basse was one. Another was Basse’s father-in-law Samuel Jordan, who was among a handful of Englishmen involved in saving Jamestown from collapse during its darkest hour about 1610. Three months before The Mayflower, Samuel Jordan in June 1609 boarded The Sea Venture in Plymouth and set sail for the New World. The recently built state-of-the-art vessel was one of eight ships to set sail that day on a mission called The Third Supply, providing new settlers and provisions for a corporation called Virginia.

Six to eight weeks out, the flotilla ran into a powerful storm – assumed to be a hurricane – and was pummeled for almost 48 hours. The Sea Venture could not hold up during the storm because it had a major flaw. Its caulking had not been allowed to thoroughly dry before the ship’s departure at Plymouth. The other seven ships survived and proceeded to Jamestown. The Sea Venture, meanwhile, was foundering somewhere in the unseen distance. Directly, the ship’s master spotted land – the Bermudas – and ordered the ship in that direction. The ship became snared between two coral reefs – which may have been a saving factor for the passengers and crew. The ship never sank and all passengers and crew were believed to have survived. However, there were some deaths on land weeks to months after the passengers and crew went ashore.

A star in the making in the Bermudas was a possible kinsman of Samuel Jordan. He was Sea Venture passenger Sylvester Jourdain, who wrote an account of the storm that bore much similarity to William Shakespeare’s “The Tempest,” but Jourdain wrote his account a good year before Shakespeare staged his play in 1611. If Shakespeare used Jourdain’s material, which was published and widely available in London as early as 1610, he did not plagiarize but simply used a journalistic account as a basis for his story. He also could have drawn from at least one other account. Both Jordan and Jourdain originally were from Dorsetshire.

Samuel Jordan and the rest in the Bermudas undertook to build two small ships from Sea Venture salvage and from such native resources as cedar. It took 10 months or so to finish the two ships and then set sail for Jamestown in 1610. Samuel Jordan and the others apparently had lived in a healthy environment in the Bermudas. After arriving in Jamestown, they were shocked by what they saw: blank stares, emaciated bodies, disarray, and a seeming desire to flee the misery of life. Of a one-time population of about 500, only 50 or so were left, and they were planning to set sail for England the next day. But Samuel Jordan and his associates were able to revive their spirits, provide food for the hungry and comfort the sick. Within a few days, the 50 were feeling good about staying in Virginia. It was one of the most important developments in American history. Without it, today’s America most likely would not exist. Instead, Spain likely would rule. It is reported that Spain had already used spies and poison against Jamestown.

There is much more we are sharing in this book about the Floyds and related families, but above all, we are
presenting a human story – a story made up of many human stories. We have, for the most part, shunned lists.
We want to bring you face to face with your ancestors so that you might see who they were and how they lived. After all, when you look in the mirror today, they are there looking back.





 
LANDCONTRA1711 He purchased land in 1711 at Isle of Wight County, VA, He and his brother bought 150 acres of land which he sold in 1741. His brother Francis sold his portion in 1755. the buying and selling land descriptions are identical. The land was near Benjamin Baldwin. A Benjamin Baldwin was the grandfather of the first Matthew Lowry. 
LANDCONTRA*1741 He purchased land in 1741 Thomas sold 150 acres in the cypress Swamp and Beaver Dam branch area to Joseph Atkinson for 20 pounds and signed the deed with a "T". He was part owner of this land with his brother Frances who sold his interest to the same Joseph Atkinson in 1755.Thomas sold the land apparently in preparation for a move to North Carolina.2 
Note*12 December 1741 He Don Floyd provided this list:
December 12, 1741 Thomas Floyd was a witness to the sale of 300 acres on the south side of Swift Creek by Thomas West and wife Sarah of Edgecombe County to Captain William Kinchin (Kinchen) of Northampton County for 35 pounds Virginia money.

November 16, 1747 Thomas Floyd of Edgecombe County sold 200 acres on the north side of Swift Creek to George Bell of Edgecombe County for 6 pounds Virginia money. This George Bell was the apparent father of Elizabeth Bell Floyd, wife of Francis Floyd, the brother of the Thomas Floyd who migrated from Isle of Wight County, Va. We will explore the close ties between Thomas and Francis Floyd later. The 200 acres listed here were part of the 640-acre grant to John Spier in 1737.

December 22, 1754 Thomas Floyd was a witness to the sale of 388 acres on the north side of Swift Creek by William Kinchen of Northampton County to Arthur Bell of Edgecombe County. Arthur Bell was the apparent son of George Bell and the brother of Elizabeth Bell Floyd, wife of Francis Floyd, the latter of whom was the brother of the Thomas Floyd from Isle of Wight County, Va.

March 7, 1755 Thomas Floyd of Edgecombe County sold 149 acres on both sides of Fishing Creek to William Bawmer for 15 pounds Virginia money. This was the same 149 acres he bought from Walter Pitts in 1753, and the net profit was 5 pounds. Witnesses were William Portis and Mathew Lowry, the latter of whom was the probable (almost certain) half brother of Thomas Floyd from Isle of Wight County, Va.

December 15, 1755 Thomas Floyds land is shown as adjoining that of Francis Floyd who just bought 288 acres on the north side of Swift Creek from William Kinchen of Northampton County.

1761 The property of Thomas Floyd was shown to be adjoining the property of Francis Parker of Edgecombe County after Parker received a grant from John Lord Carteret, first earl of Granville, the remaining member of the Lords Proprietors. This may have been the same Francis Parker to whom Penuel Floyd, son of Delilah Floyd, was bound in 1778 by order of the Nash County Court until it arrive at lawful age. on 12 December 1741.1 

Family

Child
Last Edited9 Apr 2009

Citations

  1. [S490] Donald R. Floyd, The Elusive Floyds.
  2. [S486] Donald Floyd, "Donald Floyd."

Thomas Beckwith Floyd1

M, #3938, d. 1875
Father*Thomas Penuel Floyd Sr.1 b. c 1764, d. May 1815
Mother*Mary Sarah Beckwith1
 Thomas Beckwith Floyd was the son of Thomas Penuel Floyd Sr. and Mary Sarah Beckwith.1 
Birth27 February 1802 He was born on 27 February 1802 at Nash, N.C.2 
MARRIAGE*17 December 1826 He married Martha Daniel Hunter on 17 December 1826 at N.C.2 
Death*1875 He died in 1875.1 

Family

Martha Daniel Hunter b. 16 December 1807
Last Edited8 Nov 2007

Citations

  1. [S486] Donald Floyd, "Donald Floyd."
  2. [S594] Unknown author, "Cameron/Beckwith," e-mail to MVW, Dec 12, 2006.

Thomas J. Floyd

M, #1390, b. February 1882
TOM FLOYD
Father*Archibald Floyd b. c 1844, d. 1905
Mother*Mary A. Wade b. Feb 1853, d. 25 Mar 1886
ChartsWILLIAM BASSE
Birth*February 1882 Thomas J. Floyd was born in February 1882. 
 He was the son of Archibald Floyd and Mary A. Wade
MARRIAGE*2 December 1909 He married Pet Cannon on 2 December 1909 This marriage is speculation. 
MARRIAGE*after 1910 He married Effie Howell after 1910. 
Census*1900 He appeared on the census of 1900 at Pulaski County, GA. 

Family 1

Pet Cannon

Family 2

Effie Howell b. circa 1892, d. after 1979
Last Edited25 Apr 2006

Thomas J. Floyd1

M, #3658, b. October 1892
Father*Federick Floyd1 b. Aug 1856
Mother*Leeanna (?)1 b. Aug 1872, d. b 1920
ChartsWILLIAM BASSE
Birth*October 1892 Thomas J. Floyd was born in October 1892.1 
 He was the son of Federick Floyd and Leeanna (?)1 
MARRIAGE*1909 He married Effie (?) in 1909.2,3 

Family

Effie (?) b. 1897
Last Edited2 Dec 2008

Citations

  1. [S59] 1900 Census;.
  2. [S61] 1920 Census;.
  3. [S518] 1930 Census;.

Thomas Jefferson Floyd

M, #1129, b. 5 May 1811, d. 16 March 1886
Father*Federick (Fed) Floyd b. c 1779, d. 1825
Mother*Mourning Bass b. c 1790, d. b 1860
ChartsWILLIAM BASSE
Birth*5 May 1811 Thomas Jefferson Floyd was born on 5 May 1811 at Pulaski County, GA. 
 He was the son of Federick (Fed) Floyd and Mourning Bass
MARRIAGE*say 1850 He married Elizabeth (Lizzie) Rowland, daughter of Rebecca (?), say 1850. 
Death*16 March 1886 He died on 16 March 1886 at GA at age 74. 
Burial*1886 He was buried in 1886 at GA Buried at brick church on Ouchee Road in Cochran. 
MILITARY*10 March 1836 He served in the military on 10 March 1836 at GA Shown as 2nd Lieutenant in 387th Dist G.M. 
CENSUS1850*1850 He appeared on the CENSUS in 1850 at Pulaski County, GA..1 
CENSUS1860*1860 He appeared on the census in 1860 at GA; Living in house # 678 with wife Elizabeth age 30 (2nd wife?)2 
CENSUS18701870 He appeared on the census in 1870 at GA.3 

Family

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Rowland b. 1826, d. after 1880
MARRIAGE*say 1850 He married Elizabeth (Lizzie) Rowland, daughter of Rebecca (?), say 1850. 
Children
Last Edited25 Apr 2006

Citations

  1. [S52] 1850 Census;.
  2. [S54] 1860 Census;.
  3. [S55] 1870 Census;.

Thomas Penuel Floyd Sr.1,2,3

M, #3115, b. circa 1764, d. May 1815
Mother*Delialah Floyd b. c 1750, d. a 1810
MARRIAGE* Thomas Penuel Floyd Sr. married Mary Sarah Beckwith
Birth*circa 1764 He was born circa 1764 at N.C He was bound to Francis Parker and then Nathaniel Drake in Nash County in 1778 and was fourteen at the time according to Donald Floyd's message of August 12, 2000.
April Court 1778 Ordered that Venuel Floid, a base begotten child of Delila Floid aged about 14 be bound unto Francis Parker until it [sic] arrive at lawful Age. Fee to pd. By T. H. Indenture to be prepared at next Court. 
 He was the son of Delialah Floyd
Death*May 1815 He died in May 1815 at Nash, NC, Estate Records of Nash County by Watson show deed book 14 with "Sarah Widow of Penuel" No date given
He is listed as executor in the will of Nathaniel Drake and called "brother-in-law" (Brother in law could mean step brother as well as our traditional meaning). The same will lists a Brother named Diocletian Drake Floyd who received $200.4,5 
Name Variation  Thomas Penuel Floyd Sr. was also known as Penuel Floyd In the past, I corresponded with a few Texas Floyds, the descendants of Dolphin Floyd. They said Penuel Floyds REAL name was Thomas Penuel Floyd. I have found no official evidence to back that up. All records in Nash County list him as Penuel Floyd. Some variations in spelling of Penuel, but Thomas Penuel Floyd never appears. - Don Floyd.2 
Note* He Here is a research clue for the future:I found this on Ancestry.com. Could be an early ancestor of Penuel. Floyd, Newell, 1637, by Humphry Higginson, Gent., ?? Co. View Full Context. 
CENSUS1790*1790 He appeared on the census in 1790 at Hillsborough District, Wake, NC; He is shown with four people in his household. It appears to be himself, wife and two daughters plus five slaves.6 
DEED*1794  In 1794 Nash County Court records part 2 show in Book 4 on page 259 property sale to Anne Knight et al. 
Note12 October 1797 He He was one of the witnesses to the division of Sion Basses land. on 12 October 1797 at Nash, N.C. 
DEED1798 He was shown on a deed in 1798 at NC Nash County Court Records part 2 show in Book 6 on page 314 sale of land to Abraham Bass. 
MINUTES*1803 He was mentioned in the minutes He was listed along with William Richardson as a juror for the August Court. in 1803 at NC. 
Will*7 November 1809  On 7 November 1809 at NC Will of Nathaniel Drake proved Feb Ct. 1810 lists brother Diocletian Drake Floyd, Brother Allen, sister Elisebeth Griffin, Mother Deliliah Drake, sisters Margrit and Delilah as well as brother in law Penuel Floyd (the term brother in law could mean something different than we today might suppose. It might indicate that these two people shared a common mother, but not a common father)., William Drake and witnessed by James Drake.7 
CENSUS1810*1810 He appeared on the census in 1810 at Hallifax Dist, Nash, N.C; He appears on the census with three males under ten, one male 10-16 and one male 25-45. There are females one under 10, three age 16-26 and probably his wife age 26-45. 

Family

Mary Sarah Beckwith
MARRIAGE* He married Mary Sarah Beckwith
Children
Last Edited1 Aug 2008

Citations

  1. I had the name Penuel, Thomas was given me by Cameron.
  2. [S486] Donald Floyd, "Donald Floyd."
  3. [S594] Unknown author, "Cameron/Beckwith," e-mail to MVW, Dec 12, 2006.
  4. [S552] Watson, Estate Records of North Carolina.
  5. [S594] Unknown author, "Cameron/Beckwith," e-mail to MVW, Dec 12, 2006, Cameron gave me the month of May.
  6. [S47] 1790 Census;, He is shown in the Hillsboro District (same as Amos) with four people.
  7. [S548] Margaret V. Woodrough, 2000-.

Tina Lee Floyd

F, #1521, b. 14 November 1904, d. 26 January 1979
TINA LEE FLOYD
Father*James Edward Floyd b. 25 Mar 1875, d. 19 Sep 1960
Mother*Annie Jane Holland b. 17 Jul 1884, d. 19 Apr 1967
ChartsZachariah Davis
WILLIAM BASSE
ZACHARIAS DAVIS
Birth*14 November 1904 Tina Lee Floyd was born on 14 November 1904 at Pulaski County, GA. 
 She was the daughter of James Edward Floyd and Annie Jane Holland
MARRIAGE*30 October 1933 She married Carl Edward Rosenberger on 30 October 1933 at Jacksonville, Duval, FL.
Death*26 January 1979 She died on 26 January 1979 at Jacksonville, FL, at age 74. 
Obituary27 January 1979 Obnituary of Tina Lee Floyd was Tina Floyd Rosenberger died Friday in Jacksonville after a brief illness. The funeral mass will be celebrated at St. Matthews Catholic Church with burial at Cochran City Cemetery on 27 January 1979 at Jacksonville, FL.
Employment*circa 1921  Circa 1921 at Jacksonville, FL, Tina left the farm and went to live in town with her sister Viola (Shug) and Lucian Berryhill. She got a job as the telephone operator. When a customer called "central" it was Tina who they reached. Tina's cousin, Manila became a teacher and she and her older sister went to live in Jacksonville. Tina borrowed $500. from Shug and Lucian and went to Jacksonville as well and took a business course. It was here that she met Kelly Rosenberger. 
Married Name30 October 1933  As of 30 October 1933,her married name was Rosenberger. 
Biography*1999  Tina Lee Floyd matured to be a sophisticated image of her mother. With her hair pulled straight back, the same full face and the generous figure, she was what a southerner might call the "spitting image" of her mother. Tina was different in temperment though. She had the firey temperment of her father with a bit of "Queen Victoria" thrown in. She was a woman of ambition and posessed of a huge imagination. Even at the time of her death at age 75 in 1979 she still retained a bit of the "little girl". Her last Christmas was spent in the hospital and even then she fantisized about going home to see the Christmas Tree. Christmas had always been magical for her, and she delighted in making charming hand-painted ornaments for family members.

In her lifetime Tina crocheted enough stitches to circle the globe several times. There is hardly a family member who does not own one of her caps fashioned in her colorful mix of yarns. She was never without a project and even when at work she would frequently insert her French conversation tapes into the dictaphone machine in order to spend a few moments practicing. Her room at home was full of magazines and projects waiting for completion
She loved beautiful jewelry and wore it like a queen. She more than any other family member cared about the history of the Floyd family and many stories and facts would have been lost without her active imagination and curiosity.
A visit to Tina's house was like a visit with royalty for she seemed to have all the finer things of life. She had beautuful china, crystal, silver and even a silver hairbrush. Doing dishes at her house was a special treat for the china cabinet had a wonderful odor of ceder-safeness about it. Things put into that cabinet seemed sure to be valuable and cherished. And, most wonderful of all was the bell under the carpet of the dining room just near Tina's chair. It was used for the incredible luxury of summoning the maid! 

Family

Carl Edward Rosenberger b. 24 November 1903, d. 10 August 1989
MARRIAGE*30 October 1933 She married Carl Edward Rosenberger on 30 October 1933 at Jacksonville, FL.
Child
Last Edited4 Mar 2009