Mary Barbara Ruffner1

F, #5073, b. 18 January 1777
Father*George Adam Ruffner1 b. 7 Apr 1747
Mother*Anna Maria Holstein1 b. 1751
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
Birth*18 January 1777 Mary Barbara Ruffner was born on 18 January 1777 at Goshenhoppen, Berks, PA. 
 She was the daughter of George Adam Ruffner and Anna Maria Holstein.1 
Christening21 February 1777 She was christened on 21 February 1777; Her baptism was at Peter Kass's house beyond the Lehigh river in the Blue Mountains.1 
Last Edited12 Jul 2008

Citations

  1. [S616] Tina, "George Adam Ruffner," e-mail to MVW, Jan 29, 2008.

Mary Magdalen Ruffner

F, #5074, b. 3 September 1779
Father*George Adam Ruffner b. 7 Apr 1747
Mother*Anna Maria Holstein b. 1751
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
Birth*3 September 1779 Mary Magdalen Ruffner was born on 3 September 1779 at Goshenhoppen, Berks, PA.1 
 She was the daughter of George Adam Ruffner and Anna Maria Holstein
Last Edited12 Jul 2008

Citations

  1. [S616] Tina, "George Adam Ruffner," e-mail to MVW, Jan 29, 2008.

Nancy Ruffner1

F, #438
Father*Simon Ruffner b. c 1743, d. 19 Dec 1819
Mother*Catherine Alice Griffin d. 12 Feb 1819
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
 Nancy Ruffner was the daughter of Simon Ruffner and Catherine Alice Griffin
MARRIAGE*30 October 1810  On 30 October 1810 Hi, Margo!
In regards to the location of the intersection of Braddock Rd and Ruffner Rd, I checked a Northern Virginia map. This intersection is in Alexandria. As to its location by a known landmark, I would say it is about 10 blocks north of George Washington Masonic Memorial. It also appears to be just about straight East of the Virginia Theological Seminary on Seminary Road.
And on the matter of genealogy, I recently found the following in the Fr. Helbron's Greesburg register:

"Brotice-Ruffner: October 30, 1810, John Brotice to Anna Ruffner. John Brotice returning to Clearfield with his spouse."

Now a little bit of interpretation. A written "e" and a written "k" look similar. On an old faded document, it might be impossible to see the vertical bar that makes a "k" a "k" and not an "e." I think that Fr. Helbron actually wrote BROTICK, which is a pretty good phonetic spelling of BRADDOCK. My ancestor, John Braddock, lived on Clearfield creek.

Now my uncertainty comes in because the name "Anna" is used both here and in the church records at St. Michaels at Loretto. I wish I could be sure that "Nancy" was a nickname for Anna. I feel increasingly confident that there is a marriage relationship between the RUFFNER and BRADDOCK families. I wish I could find further evidence that Nancy is Anna and this person is the daughter of Simon and Catherine Ruffner. If you ever discover such evidence, please pass it along to me.

Sincerely,

Joe David Berg
Marriage Record taken from "Catholic Baptisms in Western Pennsylvania 1799-1828 - Greensburg Register" p. 94

Database: :2630429
Individual: I521805509
Link: http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2630429&id=I521805509
Name: luke scheer
Email: lukerita@sbcglobal.net
URL:
URL title:
Note:
Spouse of Nancy Ruffner was John Braddock, son of Nicholas and Eleanor braddock of Loretto, Cambria County, PA. Nancy, aka Anna or Agnes, is listed in records of St Michaels Catholic Church, Loretto.1 
Note* She Database: :2630429
Individual: I521805509
Link: http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2630429&id=I521805509
Name: luke scheer
Email: lukerita@sbcglobal.net
URL:
URL title:
Note:
Spouse of Nancy Ruffner was John Braddock, son of Nicholas and Eleanor braddock of Loretto, Cambria County, PA. Nancy, aka Anna or Agnes, is listed in records of St Michaels Catholic Church, Loretto. 
Married Name30 October 1810  As of 30 October 1810,her married name was Braddock.1 
AnecdoteDecember 2003  In December 2003 I am writing to you because we *may* have a family link. On Roostweb.com you have a family tree that includes a Nancy Ruffner, daughter of Simon Ruffner. This person is of interest to me.
My name is Joe David Berg and I am a Braddock family genealogist. I am a descendant of Nicholas Braddock who lived in Cambria County, Pennsylvania in the early 1800s. Nicholas had three children, John, Michael, and Mary. My ancestry is through John Braddock. This John Braddock married twice. The first wife has been a very big genealogical stumbling block for us to figure out. However they did have three children. The second wife was Elizabeth Storm, and it is through her that I trace my lineage. Circumstantial evidence is beginning to accumulate suggesting that Nancy Ruffner was John Braddock's first wife.
John Braddock and his first wife had the following children:
John Clement Braddock, b. 1819
Michael John Braddock, b. 1822
Pius John Braddock, b. 1823
Recently I discovered that when John Clement Braddock married to Ellen Manner, he named one of his children Edwin Ruffner Braddock. This struck me as an unusual middle name and so I began to "Google" search the Internet for the possibilities. Ultimately I discovered that there was a Nancy Ruffner that married a "Braddock" with first name unknown. I think it could be John.
The more I have discovered about the Ruffner family, the more probable I think is this family relationship. The Braddock family was a Catholic family at St. Michael's parish at Loretto, Pennsylvania. The Ruffner's were a Catholic family at St. Vincent's (Sportsman's Hall) in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. They are neighboring counties and Catholic parishes. I would suspect that John Braddock's first marriage would have occurred about 1818 given the birth of his first child in 1819.
So I am writing to you to find out as much as possible about Nancy Ruffner. Any information you have may be helpful. Here are some questions that come to mind:
1) I believe Nancy Ruffner was about the same age as John Braddock. He was born at Hagerstown, Maryland in 1787. What do we know about Nancy?
2) Was Nancy Ruffner a Catholic? I believe the answer to this is yes. But I strongly believe that John Braddock would have married a Catholic woman.
3) Did Nancy Ruffner speak German? Somehow John Braddock learned the German language, and we suspect it was from his first wife.
4) Do you have any evidence that indicates that Nancy would have gone to Ohio? We believe the above named children were born in Ohio. They were baptized at St. Joseph's parish at Somerset, Perry County.
5) Do you know when Nancy Ruffner died? The last child was born in 1823. John married a second time in 1826.
6) We are not real sure where the three boys lived when they were very young, but after their mother died. We suspect they could have been with the Ruffner grandparents. Would you have eny evidence of this?
7) Are there any wills or other documents that might have mentioned the above named children?
8) How do you know that Nancy Ruffner married a Braddock? Is there evidence that can be identified? Did she marry at St. Vincent's?
I am sure I could come up with many other questions, but mostly I just want to express my interest in exploring a possible Braddock / Ruffner family relationship. Please respond to me if you have additional information you would like to provide. Sincerely,Joe David Berg Arlington, Virginia JBerg2112@aol.com. 
Anecdote*2004  In 2004 From:      Cheryl Myers
To:      "Margot Wodrough"
Subject:      RE: Ruffner descendants
Send reply to:      cmyers@jones.edu
Date sent:      Fri, 16 Jan 2004 09:45:21 -0500
Dear Margot,
The Braddock researchers are so far ahead of me...One of them already has Sweinberger's book. More and more they are tying Nancy to John. They are also finding that Nancy was interchangeable with Anna/Anne, which I know there is another
Ann/Anna, but.on the Cambria county website, there is a copy of the centennary(?)/centennial that lists a family of John and Ann Braddock with a son Simon Peter, daughters Catherine, Mary Ann and Emilie/Emily 1811-1817 - we believe these to be the older siblings of John C., Michael and Pius. After that, there is a John and Elizabeth (Storm) Braddock, married in 1825/26, John's second wife. Attached is a copy of an e-mail I was sent this morning from Joe Berg, an excerpt from another book...I am almost positive our John is the husband of Nancy Ruffner. Wonder what happened to her...If you are interested, I will be happy to send you a copy of all of the e-mails they have been sending me that lead them to this point...Cheryl. 

Family

John Braddock b. 1787
Children
Last Edited21 Sep 2007

Citations

  1. [S24] Jane S. Sweinberger,, Ruffners of Pennsylvania.
  2. [S559] Jo David Berg, "Nancy Ruffner," e-mail to Margaret Woodrough, Dec 12 2003.
  3. [S558] Cheryl Meyers, "Ruffner Descendants," e-mail to Margot Woodrough, Jan. 14 2004.

Nicklaus Ruffner

M, #674
Father*Simon Ruffner Sr. d. Apr 1778
Mother*Mary Barbara Schlitz b. 1706, d. 8 Sep 1803
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
 Nicklaus Ruffner was the son of Simon Ruffner Sr. and Mary Barbara Schlitz
Note* He Baptism recorded in "Jorday Luthern congregation, south Witehall Twsp., Lehigh Co. Index of baptisms. 
Last Edited27 Jan 2004

Nicklaus Ruffner1

M, #3196, b. 14 March 1749
Father*Simon Ruffner b. c 1743, d. 19 Dec 1819
Mother*Catherine Alice Griffin d. 12 Feb 1819
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
Birth*14 March 1749 Nicklaus Ruffner was born on 14 March 1749. 
 He was the son of Simon Ruffner and Catherine Alice Griffin
Last Edited24 Sep 2001

Citations

  1. This name came from Bob Schlitz through Laura Glass in 2001.

Peter Ruffner1

M, #437
Father*Simon Ruffner b. c 1743, d. 19 Dec 1819
Mother*Catherine Alice Griffin d. 12 Feb 1819
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
 Peter Ruffner was the son of Simon Ruffner and Catherine Alice Griffin
Death*  This is a guess based on date and fact a sister Elizabeth and seemingly a brother James are all listed with him on the St. Vincent Cemetery list. 
Last Edited15 Nov 2005

Citations

  1. [S24] Jane S. Sweinberger,, Ruffners of Pennsylvania.

Philip Ruffner

M, #446, b. circa 1738, d. June 1784
Father*Simon Ruffner Sr. d. Apr 1778
Mother*Mary Barbara Schlitz b. 1706, d. 8 Sep 1803
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
Birth*circa 1738 Philip Ruffner was born circa 1738. 
 He was the son of Simon Ruffner Sr. and Mary Barbara Schlitz
MARRIAGE*1754 He married Anna Catherine Kuhn in 1754. 
MARRIAGE*11 January 1774 He married Eva Hoonig on 11 January 1774. 
Death*June 1784 He died in June 1784. 

Family 1

Anna Catherine Kuhn b. 1747, d. 1773

Family 2

Eva Hoonig
Last Edited9 Jun 1998

Simon Ruffner1

M, #60, b. circa 1743, d. 19 December 1819
Father*Simon Ruffner Sr. d. Apr 1778
Mother*Mary Barbara Schlitz b. 1706, d. 8 Sep 1803
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
ReferenceA-102
Birth*circa 1743 Simon Ruffner was born circa 1743. 
 He was the son of Simon Ruffner Sr. and Mary Barbara Schlitz
MARRIAGE*8 January 1771 He married Catherine Alice Griffin, daughter of Donald Patrick Griffin, on 8 January 1771 at Goshenhoppen, PA, Witnesses were George Adam Ruffner, Simon Kupser, Margaret Kuhn and Maria Ermann. 
Death*19 December 1819 He died on 19 December 1819 at Greensburg, PA, I believe this date should read Dec 9 1819 which is the date will was filed.2 
Note* He Laura Glass found another brother named Nicklaus. Don't know where he came from. 
Religion* He was Roman Catholic. 
Biography*  The Ruffners were said to have "had the glory of giving to the church the first piece of property west of the Allegheny mountains. It was donated in March 1787, to Father Carroll, afterward Bishop of Baltimore."
The following is taken from a newspaper article written by Laurie J. Blakely January 27 1897 in Covington, KY: " In the early part of the year 1787 my great grandfather, Simon Ruffner with his brothers Christian and George, the family originally being from Maryland and the Valley of Virginia, crossed the mountains and settled in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, near the site of the Arch-Abbey of St. Vincent or between that point and Greensburg.
In the spring of 1789, ten years before the advent of Prince Gallitzzin to Loretto, the three Ruffners, with Partick Archbord and John Probst, purchased one acre and ten rods of ground near Greensburg and dedicated it to church purposes." 
Milit-Beg*1776 He began military service in 1776 at Army, PA, Simon Ruffner served with George Washington at Valley Forge. DAR papers of Annie Michel Claim descent from him and state "He served as sergeant in Northampton County Ranger Troops.1,2 
Emigration*1787 He emigrated in 1787 from Goshenhoppen, Westmoreland County, PA; Sportsman's Hall The Kuhn and Ruffner Families Westmoreland County 1786 - 1789
Photo of Elizabeth Ruffner

Isaac Ruffner Obituary
Greensburg, Pennsylvania, now the county seat of Westmoreland County, was one of the few places in Pennsylvania during the latter part of the eighteenth century and the beginning of the nineteenth in which Catholics could attend Divine Service and receive the ministrations of religion (Note! Sportsman's Hall was closer to Latrobe, Greensburg being better known was used as a reference. Sorry but I forgot where this came from) . How it came to be such a place we do not know; no doubt in measure at least, it was through its location. Westmoreland County at that time took in much more territory than it does now and must have been before the home seeking public quite a good deal. The road across the state from east to west went near Greensburg as did also the road from the south to the northwest. The land there is quite fertile and the country is most beautiful so that one can readily understand why people seeking homes would locate there. Many Catholics from Ireland and Germany and a few from France settled around about Greensburg and within an area of one hundred miles.

Reverend A. A. Lambing, in his "History of the Catholic Church in the Dioceses of Pittsburgh and Allegheny," says: "No part of western Pennsylvania figures more prominently in the history of Catholicity than Westmoreland County:" and of Sportsman's Hall he says: "It is the cradle of Catholicity in western Pennsylvania."

In the years 1787 and 1788 six Catholic families left the settlement of Goshenhoppen in the vicinity of Philadelphia and, after a difficult journey of about two hundred fifty (250) miles, settled near Greensburg in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. In the following year, the young colony received an addition of several families from the East, among whom was Henry Kuhn, who was destined to take a prominent part in the future development of the pioneer settlement.

On the 13th of March 1789, John Probst, John Young, Patrick Archibald, Simon Ruffner, Christian Ruffner and George Ruffner purchased a plot of ground, near Greensburg, from Philip Freeman for the nominal price of five shillings. This plot was intended as a site for a Catholic church and cemetery. But Greensburg was not to become the new centre of Catholicity in Pennsylvania. In 1790 the settlers began the erection of a small log church, but it was never completed - never used for divine service. In 1800 an effort was made to finish the little church, but it failed; the unfinished building was then sold and subsequently removed. For the sake of historical reminiscence it may be well to record the names of the heads of families who constituted the entire congregation when the building of this church was commenced in 1790. They are: Philip Freeman, John Probst, John Young, Patrick Archibald, Simon Ruffner, Christian Ruffner, George Ruffner, Henry Kuhn, John Topper, Patrick Griffin and Philip Hartmann. Before leaving Goshenhoppen the settlers had obtained a promise from the clergy in Philadelphia and at Goshenhoppen that a Catholic priest would visit them occasionally, and that in the course of time they would have a resident pastor. In March, 1789, Reverend John Baptist Cause (or Causey) paid them a visit. He said Mass in the house of John Probst, two miles west of Greensburg. This was the first Mass said in a permanent Catholic settlement in Western Pennsylvania. Father Cause remained only a few days, so that the little colony had assembled only once for divine service before he returned to the East.

The first resident pastor of the pioneer Catholic colony was Father Theodore Browers. He was a native of Holland, a member of the Minorite Order of St. Francis, and had been on the missions for some time in the West Indies. He arrived in Philadelphia no later than July, 1789, and stopped with Father Helbron, of Holy Trinity congregation, in Philadelphia. The trustees of Holy Trinity tried to persuade him to remain with them, but he steadfastly refused, and declared his intention of going westward. He heard of the colony that had been established in Westmoreland County and of the promise given to the settlers that they should have a resident pastor. He therefore, chose Western Pennsylvania as the field of his missionary labors.

Before leaving Philadelphia he purchased a tract of land from a certain Arthur O'Neil, of Chester County, Pennsylvania. This tract was situated on the eastern bank of Loyalhannah creek, in Derry township, Westmoreland County, and was known as O'Neil's Victory. It contained 154 acres and an allowance of 6 perches for roads, and so forth. The deed is dated August 7,1789, and receipt of payment 106 l7s) is acknowledged on the same day.

Father Browers arrived at the colony, with considerable luggage, towards the close of the year 1789. He found no suitable place for celebrating Mass.

During the winter of 1789-90 he stopped with Christian Ruffner, at whose house the Catholics assembled for divine service. In the spring of 1790 he visited O'Neil's Victory with the intention of selecting the spot upon which to erect a house for himself and a chapel for the congregation. He found that the land was not as fertile as he had expected and that the location was almost twelve miles from the Catholic settlement, and he, therefore, reluctantly desisted from his first intention of establishing himself at O'Neil's Victory.

At this time a valuable tract of land in Unity township was offered for sale. It was called 'Sportsman's Hall' - a name given to it by a Harrisburg gentleman who had frequented it as a hunting ground. Henry Kuhn, who had gained the confidence of Father Browers and who had accompanied him on his visit to O'Neil's Victory, now urged him to buy Sportsman's Hall.

The property was purchased and the deed was written, signed, sealed and delivered on the l6th day of April, 1790, in presence of William Maghee and Joseph Cook. The purchased land contained 313 acres, 8 perches and allowance. It was situated about seven miles east of Greensburg. The soil was of excellent quality. The sum paid for it was "four hundred and seventy five pounds specie, good and lawful money of Pennsylvania, to him (Joseph Hunter) in hand, at and before the sealing and delivery hereof, well and truly, paid, the receipt and payment whereof is hereby acknowledged and the said Theodorus Browers forever acquitted and exonerated."

In purchasing Sportsman's Hall, Father Browers purchased what was destined to be the cradle of Catholicity in western Pennsylvania. He himself never realized the importance of his purchase. But he had planted the mustard seed, and under the fostering hands of Divine Providence 'it grew and became a great tree.' He had been frequently heard to say: "My object is to make Sportsman's Hall another Conewago." His hopes were more than realized, for Sportsman's Hall is now St. Vincent's Abbey, which enjoys a national reputation and is the largest Benedictine establishment in the world. During the years of its existence it has sent out hundreds of zealous priests to spread the light of the Gospel in all parts of this great country.

When Fattier Browers purchased Sportsman's Hall the improvements on the estate were very trifling; a small hut or cabin had been built, and a few acres had been cleared. He at once engaged a carpenter, such as could be obtained under the circumstances, to build a house, seventeen feet square and one and one half stories high. The house was soon completed, and Father Browers took up his residence at Sportsman's Hall. He made a contract with Christian Andrews to attend to the farm, and agreed to pay him twenty three pounds a year for his services, as appears from the following receipt:

"Received of the executors, Christian Ruffner, and Henry Kuhn, twenty three pounds in full as wages for one year's work on the place of R. Theodorus Browers, deceased. Received by me, "Christian Andrews"

Father Browers continued to officiate at Christian Ruffner which was about five miles distant from his new residence, but much more convenient for the congregation. Every Sunday morning he traveled this distance on horseback, but, being of delicate constitution, he soon found his duties too exacting. One Sunday in June, whilst officiating at the altar, he was taken severely ill. He at once, Sent to Greensburg for some person competent to write his will.

The will made a few days before his death with much from one who hoped to succeed him was 'the cause of much parochial disturbance and of extended litigation in Philadelphia. This was most trying to the executors, Henry Kuhn and Christian Ruffner. During nine years the parishioners were harassed by contending parties.

But happier days were in store for the sorely afflicted Pioneers of' Catholicity of western Pennsylvania. Fattier Helbron was appointed pastor, was an estimable priest, a courteous whole-souled gentleman, cheerful, affable, kind to all, excellent company, and most thorough and exact in his spiritual duties with a soldier like discipline and careful regard to details." He arrived at the mission on the 17th of November, 1799, and at once began to evolve order out of chaos. He had great difficulties, but matters soon adjusted and Father Helbron took peaceful possession of Sportsman's Hall. As no church had as yet been built he said Mass in an apartment of his house, which, as we have seen, was but seventeen feet square. He was a zealous missionary and did not confine his labors to his congregation. He visited a number of other settlements, which had been established within a circuit of forty miles. He soon became an intimate friend of Reverend Gallitzin, to whom he paid several visits, sometimes spending a couple of weeks with him.

Previous to the arrival of Father Helbron no church records had been kept at Sportsman's Hall, but he kept a careful account of his ministrations from the date of his arrival. On the title page of the book which he used for this purpose he wrote as follows:

"Liber Baptismalis, Matrimonialis et funeralis incipiens Anno Domino 1800. Sub Rev. Dom. Petro Helbron pastore miss a Rev'ssmo Domino Joanne Carrollo Doctore et Episcopo Baltimorensi et data ipsi possessione a Curia Greensburgensi in Loco R'di Dni Browers legitimi et primi antecessoris die decima septime Decembris Anno Domini 1799."

When Father Helbron had become somewhat acquainted with his new mission he built a house 28x 26, to which the congregation built an addition, to serve them as a temporary chapel. The carpenter work was done by two men of the congregation, Henry Kuhn and George Ruffner. Nails were dear and scarce in those days, so Henry Kuhn went east of the mountains to collect money and purchase the necessary nails. In 1801, Father Helbron Wrote:

"My little chapel which I built here is finished. I blest it in the name of Jesus and entitled it the Chapel of the Holy Cross. I intend, next Spring to repair the other at Greensburg." In 1802 he wrote:

"My dwelling place shall no more be called Sportsman's Hall but Clear Spring near Greensburg." Clear Spring was a literal translation of his own Helbron, but the name never became poplar. The chapel served its purpose for a number of years but as the congregation had meanwhile rapidly increased, they wished to build a church on the spot which Father Browers had selected for this purpose and where the present church stands. Father Helbron objected and offered them the unfinished house as a place of worship, but they declined the offer. Finally about the year 1810, twenty years after the purchase of Sportsman's Hall, the first church was built. It was a log structure of 40 x 26 feet and was erected in one summer. A floor was laid but no plastering was done. Subscriptions were taken up for the building of the church: (1810) "We the Under Named Catholicks belonging to the Rev. Doctor Hillbron's Congregation, Do promise to pay to Simon Roughner, or any other person that may be appointed, the Sum Annexed to our names, for the purpose of enlarging the Church at the Rev. Doctor Hillbron's, the Money to be paid the one half when the work appears to be carried on the other half when finished. Witness our hands. The subscribers number seventy-two with a total of less than two hundred dollars ($200). A few of the contributors are:

Jacob Burgoon $3.00 Henry Reintzel $6.00

Barnabas Burgoon 1.00 George Reintzel 3.00

Levi Burgoon 1.00 Henry Reintzel, Jr 5.00

Joseph 5.00 Simon Ruffner 1.00

Henry Kuhn 1.00 Simon Ruffner 6.00

Jacob Kuhn 5.00 John Aaron 1.00

Christian Ruffner (?) George Kerr 1.50

Simon Ruffner 1.00 Frederick Kintz 4.00

Joseph Aaron 2.00 Mrs. George Ruffner 1.00

George Ruffner 3-00 Anthony Staub 1.00

George Ruffner 4.00

It is strange to note great grandfather Jacob Burgoon heading the list followed by his two sons, when in 1813 he is on the Paschal list at Loretto, and in 1816 signs a document there as one of the Church Wardens.

Father Helbron's health was generally good, but a few years before his death a tumor formed on his neck. He submitted for a long time to the treatment of local physicians, such as they were, but was ultimately obliged to go to Philadelphia for medical aid. He obtained no relief and determined to return to his mission. He was taken ill at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, where he died late in 1815 or early in 1816. He was buried near the sacristy of St. Patrick's church in that place. After Father Helbron's death, troubles were renewed until, in desperation, the congregation's appealed to the State Legislature to vest the estate in a board of trustees. Three of the five named in the enactment of the State, 1821, are Denis Conor, Frederick Kintz, and Henry Kuhn. (This is Henry 3rd of St. Xavier's fame.) While this action solved some difficulties it aroused others, and it was only at the coming of Father Stillinger and the resignation of the trustees (among whom was Great Grandfather Jacob Kuhn) that permanent peace was established. We are familiar with this dear name as hearing it often from the lips of our loved grandparents, Leo and Catherine Burgoon. To Father Stillinger we are indebted for their marriage register.

Father Stillinger was a native of Baltimore, Maryland; he was educated at Mt. St. Mary's, Ehmitsburg, and ordained by Archbishop Whitefield, February 28, 1830. He was a man of commanding presence; he "was prudent and gentle, but possessing with all a degree of firmness that enabled him to maintain his position with dignity and pass safely through trying circumstances." A more suitable person could not have been found.

In 1833 Father Stillinger began the building of a brick church and pastoral residence. The contract for the church and residence made a total of $9200. The church was dedicated by Bishop Kenrick, July 19, 1835, and as the Bishop was accustomed to name the churches which he dedicated after the saint whose feast was celebrated that day, the church was placed under the patronage of St. Vincent of Paul. This church completed was familiarly known as the "Hill Church" and is now the Chapel of the Benedictine Scholastics. Since then "Sportsman's Hall" has been known as "St. Vincents".

The builders had not done their work well. Foundation walls began to give way and many serious defects were noticeable in the construction. Repairs made in parts, the work remained still unsatisfactory. A balance of $1,400 was still due the builders, and this was withheld for damages. A suit was brought to court, but the jury found the verdict in favor of the congregation. Reverend Father Stillinger remained at St. Vincent's until November, 1844 when he moved to Blairsville, Indiana County. He was succeeded by Reverend Michael Gallagher, who remained until the coming of the Benedictines.

The first foundation of Benedictines in America arrived under the leadership of Reverend Boniface Wimmer-later first Abbot and Archabbot. They had come at the invitation of Father Lemke of Carrolltown, Pennsylvania, who hoped to have them at his mission. But after consulting with Bishop O'Connor of Pittsburgh the plan was changed to the gain of both the Benedictines and the people of Westmoreland. On October 21, 1846 Bishop O'Connor wrote the following document:

"To all whom it may concern. We do hereby appoint the Reverend Boniface Wimmer, O.S.B., pastor of the Roman Catholic Congregation, worshiping at St. Vincent's Church, Unity Township, Westmoreland County, vacant by the resignation of the Rev. M. Gallagher, and we confer upon said Rev. B. Wimmur all rights and privileges appertaining to said office of pastor of said Congregation, this appointment to hold good until revoked by us or our Successor or until. a new appointment. "Given at St. Vincent's on this twenty-first day of' October A.D. MDCCCXLVI. "M, Bp. Pittsburgh."

What a happy security after the years of storm and uncertainty, the reading of which makes one understand our parents, oft repeated prayer, thank God for our good priests!" - and their insistence on the reverence due them.1 

Family

Catherine Alice Griffin d. 12 February 1819
MARRIAGE*8 January 1771 He married Catherine Alice Griffin, daughter of Donald Patrick Griffin, on 8 January 1771 at Goshenhoppen, PA, Witnesses were George Adam Ruffner, Simon Kupser, Margaret Kuhn and Maria Ermann. 
Children
Last Edited11 Aug 2013

Citations

  1. [S34] John W. Jordan Pittsburg and Her People.
  2. [S510] DAR Annie[ITAL].

Simon Ruffner

M, #435, b. 3 September 1799
Father*Simon Ruffner b. c 1743, d. 19 Dec 1819
Mother*Catherine Alice Griffin d. 12 Feb 1819
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
Birth*3 September 1799 Simon Ruffner was born on 3 September 1799. 
 He was the son of Simon Ruffner and Catherine Alice Griffin
MARRIAGE*1823 He married Jane Layton in 1823.1 

Family

Jane Layton d. 1873
Last Edited25 Jan 2005

Citations

  1. [S24] Jane S. Sweinberger,, Ruffners of Pennsylvania.

Simon Ruffner1

M, #3579, b. 3 October 1801
Father*George Adam Ruffner1 b. 27 Apr 1776
Mother*Sybilla Easly1
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
Birth*3 October 1801 Simon Ruffner was born on 3 October 1801 at Greensburg, PA.1 
 He was the son of George Adam Ruffner and Sybilla Easly.1 
Baptism1 November 1801 He was baptized on 1 November 1801 at Greensburg, PA.1 
Last Edited26 Feb 2003

Citations

  1. [S509] Helbron Register,.

Simon Ruffner Sr.1

M, #441, d. April 1778
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
Reference1250
Birth* Simon Ruffner Sr. was born. 
MARRIAGE* He married Mary Barbara Schlitz Mary Barbara Schlitz/Schlutz
.commentAuthor
Added by prufner33751 on 6 Oct 2007 Recently an obit was found in German newspaper in the Archives in Allentown, PA. This information shows that Mary Barbara Schlitz/Schultz was born in Germany. She was the second wife of Simon Rufner(Ruffner, Rufener eet cetera)She came with him from Germany and it is thought that George Adam was born on the ship over or after it docked in the Philadelphia Harbor. She went to Westmoreland Co. PA with her son Simon after her husband died. She is buried in the Catholic Cemetery there.
(The above comment was posted on Ancestry.com in response to a posted genealogy.) 
Death*April 1778 He died in April 1778 Month found on Ruffner website. 
Biography*  Update May 2011. After a recent e-mail exchange with Ruffner family and a bit of independant research I've decided that the Ruffner Cave story is probably a myth. A Peter Ruffner married Mary Steinman in 1739 in eastern Pennsylvania. Her father was wealthy and gave the Shanendoah Valley property to the couple as a wedding gift. This was long before the Ruffners from Mainz Germany arrived. Perhaps the earlier Peter was the ancestor from Switzerland. Also, the statement that our ancestor was the first of the family to be Catholic does not square with the obvious association with Gallitzin and also with Arch Abbot Wimmer and Aloysius Blakely. There is much information on line if someone wants to research. I do believe that Laurie Blakely's account below was an amalgum of stories all true but not all related. MVW


Family tradition (1980's say that this man's family came from Mainz Germany. It also says that this man was the first of the family to be Catholic.)
In 1998 proof of this family tradition was found. " Simon Ruffner came from Mayence, Germany, and was doubtless the Pennsylvania ancestor of the family. He had four sons: Simon, George, Christian and Philip."
Here is Laurie J. Blakely's account of the family.

(Newspaper article)          SOME EARLY CATHOLIC HISTORY
     An article in the January Angelus Magazine relating to the early Catholic settlement at Loretto, western Pennsylvania, founded and fostered by Father Gallitzin, a Russian nobleman, elicits the following correction from the descendant of another old Catholic family. Our correspondent says that his account slightly differs from that of Rev. A. A. Lambing, the historian; but the latter, since writing his history, has had cause to "modify his view as to the early traditions of the family." and gives our correspondent's statement precedence over his own. Simon Ruffner, the ancestor of these Catholic families, was baptized in the old church at Goshenhoppen, VA, near the Luray Caverns, in 1744.
     COVINGTON, KY., January 27, 1807.(I think this is a typo and should be 1807 - mvw)     Editor Catholic Columbian: I have just finished reading an interesting sketch of Father Gallitzin in the January Angelus Magazine, by Ida M. Matson, and address you not to criticize it, but to correct the statement made by the writer that the chapel at Loretto, built in 1799 by the Prince-Priest, was "the first, and for many years the only sanctuary of the faith between Lancaster, PA., and St. Louis, Missouri."
     In the early part of the year 1787 my great-grandfather, Simon Ruffner, with his brothers Christian and George, the family originally being from Maryland and the Valley of Virginia, crossed the mountains and settled in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, near the site of the Arch-Abbey of St. Vincent, or between that point and Greensburg.
     In the spring of 1789, ten years before the advent of Prince Gallitzin to Loretto, the three Ruffners, with Patrick Archbold and John Probst, purchased one acre and ten roods of ground near Greensburg and dedicated it to church purposes, the title being transferred to Father, afterwards Archbishop Carroll. This was, I believe, the first property owned by the Church west of the Alleghenies and within the then limits of the United States. In the same year the settlers built a church, but it was never wholly completed: and as to whether the Divine Sacrifice was ever offered in it, or not, tradition varies. Certain it is, the place was visited by Fathers from Conewago and Goshenhoppen, my ancestors before crossing the mountains having received the promise that priests would visit them; and it is equally certain that for six months in the year 1789 the Holy Sacrifice was offered up in the house of my great-grandfather, the priest in the iterim visiting the scatterred settlers in the mountains.
     Within a comparatively short time a Church was built and finished, and its sentenary was observed in the Church of The Sacred Heart at Greensburg in 1879, three great-grandsons of Simon Ruffner officiating, Rev. A. A. Lambing, LL. D. the historian; his brother Rev. M. A. Lambing, and a third whose name I do not now recall. My brother, Rev. Aloysius M. Blakely, C. P. now a missionary in Bulgaria was to have delivered the sermon but was unavailably detained elsewhere.
     This church, therefore, was built before Father Carroll was consecrated Bishop, before Bishop Fiaget visited Kentucky and, in fact, is entitled to precedence, by reason of seniority, to all churches west of the Alleghenies.
     With the other incidents mentioned by the writer of the sketch of Father Gallitzin I am very familiar. Many of my kinspeople followed Father Gallitzin from Maryland to the mountains. I myself spent two years at the college at Loretto, and many a time, with good and humble Brother Clement, our prefect of studies, I have sat and kneeled-- that was in youthful days-at the base of "Gallitzine's pine".
L.J.B.
RUFFNER MADONNA

"OH! Pain and suffering my heart did not feel since I saw my Jesus with many thousand wounds." Is the translation from what I am told is a very old german.
Walter Ruffner
Psgr List*2 September 1743 He was found on a passenger list on 2 September 1743 at Loyal Judith; Rotterdam; Several sources show this event. His age on printed list shows 56. However, it is likely he was 36. He came as a Palatine. Record exists of his loyalty oath. Record states " he arrived at the 7th hour of September 2 1743 aboard the Loyal Judith, Captain James Cowey, Master" The ship sailed from Rotterdam and was "last from Cowes, England."2 
Residence*circa 1745 He lived circa 1745 at VA; He settled in the valley of the Virginia and was a noted hunter and pioneer character. Ruffner's Cave, in the beautiful Shenandoah valley, was named for him, as he was lost in the cave at one time and was rescued in a half-starved condition.1 
Residencecirca 1745 He lived circa 1745 at Goshenhoppen, PA.3 

Family

Mary Barbara Schlitz b. 1706, d. 8 September 1803
MARRIAGE* He married Mary Barbara Schlitz Mary Barbara Schlitz/Schlutz
.commentAuthor
Added by prufner33751 on 6 Oct 2007 Recently an obit was found in German newspaper in the Archives in Allentown, PA. This information shows that Mary Barbara Schlitz/Schultz was born in Germany. She was the second wife of Simon Rufner(Ruffner, Rufener eet cetera)She came with him from Germany and it is thought that George Adam was born on the ship over or after it docked in the Philadelphia Harbor. She went to Westmoreland Co. PA with her son Simon after her husband died. She is buried in the Catholic Cemetery there.
(The above comment was posted on Ancestry.com in response to a posted genealogy.) 
Children
Last Edited7 Jul 2011

Citations

  1. [S34] John W. Jordan Pittsburg and Her People.
  2. [S26] William John Hinke Pennsylvania German Pioneers.
  3. [S24] Jane S. Sweinberger,, Ruffners of Pennsylvania.

Sallie Rule

F, #571
Married Name Her married name was Thompson. 

Family

Children
Last Edited3 May 1999

Anna Barbara Runftin

F, #2758
ChartsHerman Charles Vollmer
ReferenceB-35
MARRIAGE*say 1819 Anna Barbara Runftin married George Christian Schneider say 1819. 
Married Namesay 1819  As of say 1819,her married name was Schneider. 

Family

George Christian Schneider
Child
Last Edited17 Aug 1994

Ralph Edward Runkle

M, #306
MARRIAGE*16 October 1829 Ralph Edward Runkle married Hannah Isabel Piatt, daughter of Benjamin McCullough Piatt and Elizabeth Barnett, on 16 October 1829. 

Family

Hannah Isabel Piatt b. 7 October 1804, d. 13 May 1839
Last Edited3 May 1999

Matilda Runnels

F, #1164, b. 1807
ReferenceB-55
Birth*1807 Matilda Runnels was born in 1807. 
MARRIAGE*13 January 1825 She married Tommy King, son of John King and Priscilla Williams, on 13 January 1825 This information and information on his parents provided by Doris Dixon of Cochran, GA.1,2 
Married Name13 January 1825  As of 13 January 1825,her married name was King. 

Family

Tommy King b. 1801
Child
Last Edited7 Sep 2001

Citations

  1. [S333] Unknown subject MVW file.
  2. [S23] Doris Floyd Dixon, "Pedigree Chart."

Maria De La Ascension Russel Malpica1

F, #5203, b. circa 1854
Birth*circa 1854 Maria De La Ascension Russel Malpica was born circa 1854.1 
MARRIAGE*31 January 1874 She married Miguel Gaston Gaston, son of Maria Josefa Gaston Ansiategui, on 31 January 1874 at Havana, Cuba.1 

Family

Miguel Gaston Gaston b. 10 July 1846, d. 5 August 1888
Children
Last Edited12 Feb 2009

Citations

  1. [S522] International Genealogical Index (IGI).

Aileen Elizabeth Ryan1

F, #3607, b. 24 June 1940
Father*Joseph Blakely Ryan1 b. 6 Feb 1909, d. 13 Jan 1990
Mother*Alice G. Stapleton1 b. 23 Apr 1914, d. 29 Sep 1969
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
MARRIAGE* Aileen Elizabeth Ryan married Charles Reinstatler.1 
Birth*24 June 1940 She was born on 24 June 1940.1 
 She was the daughter of Joseph Blakely Ryan and Alice G. Stapleton.1 
Married Name Her married name was Reinstatler.1 

Family

Charles Reinstatler b. 13 February 1939
Last Edited8 Sep 2003

Citations

  1. [S496] Kay Ryan, "Kay Ryan to LWG," e-mail to Laura Woodrough Glass, 2000.

Anna Agnes Ryan1,2

F, #3240, b. 21 July 1861, d. 31 October 1866
Father*John Becan Ryan2 b. 1826, d. 19 Jan 1871
Mother*Mary Louise Blakely2 b. 12 Dec 1832, d. 21 Feb 1908
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
Birth*21 July 1861 Anna Agnes Ryan was born on 21 July 1861.2 
 She was the daughter of John Becan Ryan and Mary Louise Blakely.2 
Death*31 October 1866 She died on 31 October 1866 at age 5 She died of Cholera on the same day as her younger sister, Susan. Both were buried the same day as well.3 
Burial*1 November 1866 She was buried on 1 November 1866. 
Last Edited27 Sep 2003

Citations

  1. She is twin of Beatrice.
  2. [S496] Kay Ryan, "Kay Ryan to LWG," e-mail to Laura Woodrough Glass, 2000.
  3. [S56] 1880 Census;.

Beatrice Grace Ryan1

F, #3239, b. circa 1869, d. 28 September 1887
BEATRICE GRACE BLAKELY
Father*John Becan Ryan1 b. 1826, d. 19 Jan 1871
Mother*Mary Louise Blakely1 b. 12 Dec 1832, d. 21 Feb 1908
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
Birth*circa 1869 Beatrice Grace Ryan was born circa 1869.1 
 She was the daughter of John Becan Ryan and Mary Louise Blakely.1 
Death*28 September 1887 She died on 28 September 1887 at Cincinnati, Hamilton County, OH.1 
CENSUS1880*1880 She appeared on the Census in 1880 at Cincinnati, OH.2 
Last Edited19 Sep 2005

Citations

  1. [S496] Kay Ryan, "Kay Ryan to LWG," e-mail to Laura Woodrough Glass, 2000.
  2. [S56] 1880 Census;, She is shown living with her widowed mother T9-1025 p. 9A.

Cornelius Ryan

M, #3105

Family

Child
Last Edited10 Apr 2000

Effie Virginia Ryan

F, #276, b. 26 October 1857, d. 25 May 1912
EFFIE V. RYAN
Effie Virginia Ryan
Father*John Becan Ryan b. 1826, d. 19 Jan 1871
Mother*Mary Louise Blakely b. 12 Dec 1832, d. 21 Feb 1908
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
Birth*26 October 1857 Effie Virginia Ryan was born on 26 October 1857.1 
 She was the daughter of John Becan Ryan and Mary Louise Blakely
Probate*26 August 1904 Her estate was probated on 26 August 1904 at St. Mary's, Elk County, PA, Will Book B p.219. 
Death*25 May 1912  On 25 May 1912 at Atlantic City, NJ, Effie had not been in the best of health for some time and in April had traveled to Atlantic City, New Jersey for a ten-day's rest. While visiting in that city, she was taken ill and entered Galan Hall, where she underwent surgery. Her condition grew steadily worse, in spite of all their efforts to help her. Her family was notified of her serious condition and went immediately to Atlantic City. She died on May 25th, 1912, surrounded by her loving family. Her body was brought back to Cincinnati where a Requiem Mass was chanted at St. Xavier Church, followed by her interment in the family plot at St. Joseph New Cemetery in Delhi, Ohio.2,3      

 
Name Variation  Effie Virginia Ryan was also known as Evarista Virginia Ryan. 
Biography  The second child of John and Mary Louise [Blakely] Ryan, was born on October 26, 1857 in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. Her name was Evarista Virginia Ryan and she was baptized on October 29th, at St. Xavier Church in Cincinnati, with John Bowes and Catherine McCully as her sponsors.

The Benedictines at Annunciation Academy in Kearney, Nebraska where her aunt, Sr. Beatrice Blakely, as she was called, was Mother Superior, educated “Effie”. Determined to embark on a business career, she prepared herself in typing and shorthand.

There are many newspaper clippings about the career of Miss Effie that are too numerous to list here. The following article was published in 1896 and sums up everything nicely:
HARMON'S ACT
He Cuts Off Miss Effie V. Ryan's Official Head.
The Government Building People Much Surprised
Finale of Some Interesting Correspondence Between Here and Washington-Its Sequel.
The many friends of Miss Effie V. Ryan, who since Oct. 19, 1887 has been the official stenographer on the Court floor of the Government Building, will be greatly surprised to learn that she has been summarily dropped by the order of U. S. Attorney General Judson Harmon.
The Attorney General's final action in this matter has caused no end of talk about the Government Building. Monday there was great surprise manifested in all the departments that Miss Ryan had been dropped. The Attorney General's course regarding Miss Ryan, who is one of the best known Court stenographers in the country by reason of the office she held, is a puzzle to some.
The story is not a new one. Miss Ryan was appointed to a position by Attorney General Garland, under Cleveland's first Administration. W. H. Burnet was the District Attorney. The Fidelity National Bank failure had occurred and the District Attorney's office overrun with work. Mr. Burnet found it absolutely necessary to have relief and secured permission from Garland to have a stenographer. Miss Ryan was appointed. She was soon called into the Fidelity grand jury cases, and was appointed in an official way to take the evidence before the Fidelity grand jury.
The appointment was the first one of the kind ever given a woman in the U. S. Courts in this country, and attracted much attention. The grand jury lasted eleven days, and next she was called into the Harper trial, and took evidence for fourteen days. Next came the Metropolitan Bank cases and the trial of Hopkins; she took this, working thirty-seven days. All this was extra work, not provided for under her appointment. After the trials were over, Mr. Burnet went to Washington City, and after consultation with the authorities, succeeded in getting Miss Ryan retained in office.
There is no U. S. District Attorney's office in the country allowed an appropriation for a stenographer, and as a result every Attorney General since Garland's time has had her position to consider. Miller and Olney both passed on it, and allowed her to remain. When Judge Harmon went to Washington, he too had his attention drawn to the position. One day, about the middle of last February, District Attorney Harlan Cleveland received a letter from Judge Harmon saying that Miss Ryan's service would be abolished.
Judge Sage took the matter up and wrote a letter to the Attorney General, explaining that Miss Ryan was not really employed and paid by the District Attorney's office--that she was employed to do certain kinds of Court work, and that her dismissal was a mistake. Attorney General Harmon telegraphed to District Attorney Cleveland to reinstate Miss Ryan at once.

The last time the Attorney General was in Cincinnati he seems to have looked into the matter further, at the suggestion of some people who are declared to have had an ulterior motive in displacing Miss Ryan. Upon his return to Washington City, he wrote the District Attorney a letter saying that he had reviewed the case and decided to revoke his telegram saying that she be reinstated. The result of the whole business is that Miss Ryan finds herself out after nine years of faithful service. Her work in the Fidelity cases was gratuitous and not paid for. The Government has never rewarded her for this work because there was no appropriation for it.
After her reinstatement in February she was called into several      important cases and sworn in as official clerk of the U. S. grand jury--an honor for the first time conferred upon a woman in this      country.
There is said to be a little bit of very interesting history back of her displacement by the Attorney General, and those who have kept track of this case declare that it will have an echo of unexpected      proportions. Miss Ryan has the friendship of a wide circle of people who will be sorry to learn of the way in which she has been dealt with by Cincinnati's member of President Cleveland's Cabinet. While Effie was performing her duties as Special Examiner in the Fidelity Bank case, this article appeared in the local newspaper and provides an amusing glimpse of the times in which this pioneer lady lived.

WALKS AND TALKS
A good story is being told about the United Courts and the lawyers' offices: "Miss Effie V. Ryan, the handsome lady stenographer of the United States Court, was some time ago made a Special Examiner for the taking of depositions in the three million dollar suit against the directors of the Fidelity Bank. She has examined a number of witnesses and is the only court of the kind which can report the evidence taken before it and write it out accurately. When she is not examining witnesses, she is diligently engaged transcribing her shorthand notes by means of a typewriter. The other day she issued subpoenas for a half dozen bank officials to appear at 2 o'clock. They came promptly to hand, as bank men usually do. Miss Ryan was sitting at her typewriter, and they paid as little attention to her as she did to them, she, as the court, waiting for the appearance of the District Attorney and other lawyers. The banking bloods became impatient at the delay and began wondering where Mr. Ryan could be. One who assumed to speak the loudest, by reason of seniority, loudly asserted: "Mr. Ryan should not have summoned us till half past two if he couldn't be on hand himself." Miss Ryan leaned over her typewriter and said never a word. Presently Mr. Wilby, with the lawyers in the case, came into the room. On seeing him, the eldest bank officer shouted out: "Say, Wilby, who is this fellow Ryan?" Wilby looked confused and turned the conversation.
Presently the District Attorney came in and Miss Ryan said to him: "Mr. Burnet, we had better go right on and not wait for the others." The examination then began; but it was some moments before the bankers "caught on" to the fact that the fair stenographer was the court, and the "Mr." Ryan they had been pitching into so vigorously,before her face. In their turn they never said a word, and will not make the same mistake again.
Miss Ryan, when asked about the amusing episode, didn't affirm or deny it, but the mirth in her countenance, as the scene was recalled, was confirmation of the truth to the story.
Mr. Burnet knew nothing of it till a Telegram walker told him the story. He laughed quite heartily about it and remarked: "Oh, that's nothing. Just wait till her court regularly opens and you     hear her addressed as Your Honor. Then you'll see some of the people open their eyes in genuine astonishment."When Harmon so unceremoniously dismissed Effie, there was a bit of an upheaval in the court building. Citing the fact that Effie had never been paid for her services due to an oversight and Government "red tape," she received many offers of assistance and legal advice from her many friends. However, she chose instead to continue her career in the District Attorney's office. She would eventually resign her position and open a school in her home, teaching typing and short hand and the art of stenography.
In her spare time, Effie was interested in the theatrical arts. She and her friends would put on and star in plays. The name of their group was The Maskers, and one such play resulted in this write up in the newspaper:
The young society people of the Cathedral, composing the dramatic club called The Maskers, gave two charming and most interesting comedy plays at St. Mary's Hall last evening, to a very large audience. ...Miss Effie Ryan as Louise de la Glaciere was lovely, and won applause as the beautiful wife of the Baron de Glaciere in the third act. The club is certainly entitled to great praise for the artistic and intelligent presentation of two such high class plays, as the one’s which furnished the entertainment last evening.
Effie was an active participant in the election of Miss Edith Campbell to the School Board of Cincinnati, who was the first woman to hold that position. She was also an active member of the Women's Club of Cincinnati for many years. Effie Virginia Ryan, finding fulfillment in her career, family and friends, never married. According to an announcement of her death in 1912 in a Cincinnati newspaper.

     
 
Biography*26 August 1904  On 26 August 1904 She was the administrator of estate of Sue Blakely. Filed affidavit Aug 26, 1904. 
Last Edited28 Apr 2006

Citations

  1. [S494] Laura Glass, "Laura Woodrough Glass correspondence", This is taken from information assembled by LWG. Individual sources will be mentioned in each item.

    My source for the THOMAS SHORE information was Marshall SHORE, who has done
    extensive research on the SHORE ancestors; also, received information from
    Tommy Wiggins, a descendant, on Jane Shore Morin and William STAMPS, and Sue Moore, another descendant of Jane Shore & James MORIN.
    But Marshall Shore was the main source of info.
    LWG.
  2. [S17] SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.
  3. [S563] Laura Steneck, "Laura Steneck," e-mail to Margot Woodrough.

Evarista Virginia Ryan1

F, #3605, b. 18 May 1919, d. 17 June 1921
Father*James Cornelius Ryan1 b. 11 Jul 1859, d. 11 Oct 1936
Mother*Mary Elizabeth Shilling1 b. 29 Feb 1880, d. 23 Aug 1956
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
Birth*18 May 1919 Evarista Virginia Ryan was born on 18 May 1919.1 
 She was the daughter of James Cornelius Ryan and Mary Elizabeth Shilling.1 
Death*17 June 1921 She died on 17 June 1921 at age 2.1 
Last Edited18 Apr 2003

Citations

  1. [S496] Kay Ryan, "Kay Ryan to LWG," e-mail to Laura Woodrough Glass, 2000.

Francis Xavier Ryan

M, #3848, b. 10 July 1865, d. 10 July 1865
Father*John Becan Ryan b. 1826, d. 19 Jan 1871
Mother*Mary Louise Blakely b. 12 Dec 1832, d. 21 Feb 1908
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
Death*10 July 1865 Francis Xavier Ryan died on 10 July 1865. 
Birth*10 July 1865 He was born on 10 July 1865. 
 He was the son of John Becan Ryan and Mary Louise Blakely
Last Edited27 Sep 2003

James Blakely Ryan

M, #3600, b. 17 July 1904, d. 26 July 1904
Father*James Cornelius Ryan b. 11 Jul 1859, d. 11 Oct 1936
Mother*Mary Elizabeth Shilling b. 29 Feb 1880, d. 23 Aug 1956
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
Birth*17 July 1904 James Blakely Ryan was born on 17 July 1904. 
 He was the son of James Cornelius Ryan and Mary Elizabeth Shilling
Death*26 July 1904 He died on 26 July 1904. 
Last Edited18 Apr 2003

James Cornelius Ryan1

M, #3236, b. 11 July 1859, d. 11 October 1936
JAMES CORNELIUS RYAN
Father*John Becan Ryan1 b. 1826, d. 19 Jan 1871
Mother*Mary Louise Blakely1 b. 12 Dec 1832, d. 21 Feb 1908
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
Birth*11 July 1859 James Cornelius Ryan was born on 11 July 1859 at Cincinnati, Hamilton County, OH.1 
 He was the son of John Becan Ryan and Mary Louise Blakely.1 
MARRIAGE*5 September 1901 He married Mary Elizabeth Shilling, daughter of Bernard Schilling and Elizabeth Eicholt, on 5 September 1901.1 
Death*11 October 1936 He died on 11 October 1936 at Dayton, KY, at age 77.1 

Family

Mary Elizabeth Shilling b. 29 February 1880, d. 23 August 1956
Children
Last Edited19 Sep 2005

Citations

  1. [S496] Kay Ryan, "Kay Ryan to LWG," e-mail to Laura Woodrough Glass, 2000.

James Ruffner Ryan1

M, #3603, b. 1 March 1911, d. 30 August 1988
Father*James Cornelius Ryan1 b. 11 Jul 1859, d. 11 Oct 1936
Mother*Mary Elizabeth Shilling1 b. 29 Feb 1880, d. 23 Aug 1956
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
Birth*1 March 1911 James Ruffner Ryan was born on 1 March 1911.1 
 He was the son of James Cornelius Ryan and Mary Elizabeth Shilling.1 
Death*30 August 1988 He died on 30 August 1988 at Tulsa, OK, at age 77.1 
Last Edited18 Apr 2003

Citations

  1. [S496] Kay Ryan, "Kay Ryan to LWG," e-mail to Laura Woodrough Glass, 2000.

John Becan Ryan

M, #275, b. 1826, d. 19 January 1871
Father*Cornelius Ryan
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
Birth*1826 John Becan Ryan was born in 1826 at Ireland 1880 census says he was born in England. 
 He was the son of Cornelius Ryan
MARRIAGE*11 September 1855 He married Mary Louise Blakely, daughter of James B. Blakely and Susananna Smyth, on 11 September 1855 at Pittsburgh, PA, Husband's name and marriage date courtesy of a Ryan relative. Her wedding was at St. Paul's Cathedral in Pittsburgh.1 
Death*19 January 1871  On 19 January 1871 John suffered a heart attack and died on January 19, 1871. His obituary stated:

     In religion, Mr. Ryan was a devoted Catholic. He was a genial and           generous friend, a gentleman in the fullest sense of the word, possessed           business qualifications of the highest order, was a person of the           strictest integrity, a very devoted husband and father, and was                respected by all who knew him. He leaves a wife, delicate in health,           but of culture and refinement and a lovely family of six children, four           girls and two boys, the eldest being fourteen and the youngest two           years of age, to mourn his loss.

 
Biography*1851  In 1851 John B. Ryan was born in County Cork, Ireland in 1826, the son of Cornelius and Ann Ryan. Cornelius was a very wealthy businessman connected with the construction of canals, and like many other men of his time lost everything during the financial panics of the late 1850s.

John received a tolerably good education, then served an apprenticeship at paper making in Hamilton Ohio. Later he worked in a Mr. Grahams’ store that was connected with the paper manufactory.

On January 1, 1851 he entered as partner into the house of Applegate & Company. In March of that year, having been born in Ireland, John applied for and received his naturalization papers becoming an American citizen.

John was working at Applegate & Company when he married Mary Louise Blakely, and he remained there until March 1, 1859. After leaving the firm of Applegate & Co. he worked for “Dodge's Patent Stove & Grate business.” Allegedly, this was a precursor to the modern centralized heating system.
 

Family

Mary Louise Blakely b. 12 December 1832, d. 21 February 1908
Children
Last Edited28 Apr 2006

Citations

  1. [S17] SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.
  2. [S496] Kay Ryan, "Kay Ryan to LWG," e-mail to Laura Woodrough Glass, 2000.

John Becan Ryan1

M, #3237, b. 2 October 1863, d. 27 March 1919
JOHN B. RYAN
Father*John Becan Ryan1 b. 1826, d. 19 Jan 1871
Mother*Mary Louise Blakely1 b. 12 Dec 1832, d. 21 Feb 1908
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
Birth*2 October 1863 John Becan Ryan was born on 2 October 1863.1 
 He was the son of John Becan Ryan and Mary Louise Blakely.1 
Death*27 March 1919 He died on 27 March 1919 at Cincinnati, Hamilton County, OH, at age 55.1 
CENSUS1880*1880 He appeared on the Census in 1880 at Cincinnati, OH; Occupation given as Telegraph Messenger.2 
Last Edited19 Sep 2005

Citations

  1. [S496] Kay Ryan, "Kay Ryan to LWG," e-mail to Laura Woodrough Glass, 2000.
  2. [S56] 1880 Census;.

John Cornelius Ryan1

M, #3604, b. 6 May 1916, d. 20 March 1999
Father*James Cornelius Ryan1 b. 11 Jul 1859, d. 11 Oct 1936
Mother*Mary Elizabeth Shilling1 b. 29 Feb 1880, d. 23 Aug 1956
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
Birth*6 May 1916 John Cornelius Ryan was born on 6 May 1916.1 
 He was the son of James Cornelius Ryan and Mary Elizabeth Shilling.1 
MARRIAGE*14 August 1948 He married Jeanne Mary Buschmiller on 14 August 1948 at Cincinnati, OH.1 
Death*20 March 1999 He died on 20 March 1999 at OH at age 82.1 

Family

Jeanne Mary Buschmiller b. 27 October 1925, d. 25 March 2001
Last Edited18 Apr 2003

Citations

  1. [S496] Kay Ryan, "Kay Ryan to LWG," e-mail to Laura Woodrough Glass, 2000.

Joseph Blakely Ryan1

M, #3602, b. 6 February 1909, d. 13 January 1990
Father*James Cornelius Ryan1 b. 11 Jul 1859, d. 11 Oct 1936
Mother*Mary Elizabeth Shilling1 b. 29 Feb 1880, d. 23 Aug 1956
ChartsSIMON RUFFNER
BLAKELY
Birth*6 February 1909 Joseph Blakely Ryan was born on 6 February 1909.1 
 He was the son of James Cornelius Ryan and Mary Elizabeth Shilling.1 
MARRIAGE*24 October 1939 He married Alice G. Stapleton on 24 October 1939.1 
Death*13 January 1990 He died on 13 January 1990 at age 80.1 

Family

Alice G. Stapleton b. 23 April 1914, d. 29 September 1969
Child
Last Edited18 Apr 2003

Citations

  1. [S496] Kay Ryan, "Kay Ryan to LWG," e-mail to Laura Woodrough Glass, 2000.